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Old 01-16-2009, 08:58 PM   #121
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Gulf Island Building.


Any time you want to drop on over is OK with me. Just send me a p.m. and I'll let you know exactly where we are. Actually, if you head for Herring Bay, you will see our place from the water before you get here.

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Old 01-16-2009, 10:20 PM   #122
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Gulf Island Building.


Was just googling your site????...if it is 49 04 07 99 N Lat...and 129 41 49 94 W Long... the photo was a bit fuzzy, but looking at your pixs and 'mock up"... looks close...? I am at 684 Hillview Ave in Ladysmith.. but then I have time to do 'nonsense items', such as this, and it can become a terrible addiction! Off to lala land. Cheers.
Syd
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Old 01-17-2009, 12:37 AM   #123
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Gulf Island Building.


Pretty close. According to my GPS right here at the computer, I am at
49 04.912, 123 42.768. You have to put up with decimals on this one.
Enough fog here for you?
Another trip to Nanaimo this morning for more bits and pieces. Discovered that you need a different and 2 1/2 times more expensive thinset for granite and marble tiles. Found a nice ultra light weight tile backer at the House of Pot. Makes a big difference from moving the concrete type backer. About the same price.
When I insulated the utility room ceiling last night, I realized that I had better get the drain in place from the soaker tub upstairs. Forgot that I had not got the fittings for that, so over to town for that as well. Plus some taps for the tub. Thought it might be not such a bad idea to be able to put some water in it.
Heres the tub out of its' hole.
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Old 01-17-2009, 12:40 AM   #124
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Gulf Island Building.


Wife had another box of the short cedar boards for the valence ready when I returned, so here they are all gunned up. Still need lots more to finish up, but it's starting to take shape.
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Old 01-17-2009, 12:42 AM   #125
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Gulf Island Building.


Not quite as interesting as the valence, but I also managed to get the plywood curve in place in the center of the back side of the cabinets. To be used as an additional support for the long cedar strips which will cover the outside.
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Old 01-19-2009, 09:48 PM   #126
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Gulf Island Building.


If you have read this far, you know that I cut the bulk of the wood that went into this house on a small sawmill here. Most of what shows is cedar, so I thought I might try to offer a brief word or three about this wood.
Cedar is commonly used to do such things as fences, deck surfaces, siding, hand rails and the like.
Depending on the quality of the cedar at hand, you may also find it doing service as an interior finish wood.
On the west coast, we have yellow cedar, a wood quickly becoming very uncommon. The yellow cedar is a tree which can grow to truly biblical proportions. The wood itself is a very fine grained and consistent color. In fact, in many cases the grain - to all intents and purposes - does not show at all. It almost looks artificial it is so uniform. It is a favorite of wood carvers universally.
Yellow cedar logs are not commonly found floating around in the ocean, as they are too valuable to lose from a boom. The log salvors will usually grab any they see quickly.
I have perhaps found one log a year in yellow cedar. I use it as an accent wood in combination with red cedar. An example of this would be in the railings outside the front entrance.
It is a reasonably dense wood, and the locally found yellow is about twice the specific gravity of red when fully dried.
Red cedar is drastically different from yellow in many ways.
It too grows to gigantic sizes and can be a magnificent tree when left alone for 1,000 years or so.
It is considerably more common than yellow, and this is demonstrated by its' much greater availability.
Red cedar is often the choice of the British Columbia natives when carving totem poles, as well as a variety of other smaller items.
For the builder, red cedar represents an easily worked and generally long lasting wood. It is naturally resistant to decay. It is light when dry, and bears quite a striking array of colors when cut and planed.
Just looking at a small piece of red cedar will give you a good hint as to what sort of tree it came from.
"Red" is perhaps a misnomer, although that is the name it is referred to as.
It is more generally a light brown.
A young tree, say up to 150 years old or so, will show fairly coarse growth rings. The outer portion of the log may be decidedly creamy in color. There may be a much darker heart wood, and this delineation will likely come at one specific growth ring. The difference in the two colors will be striking.
As the trees age, there tends to be more of the darker wood. Sometimes, when finding a chunk of old growth cedar, the entire log may be very dark right through. One other important factor is that the older the tree, the closer the rings tend to be. Not always 100% of the time, but generally.
If you should run across a cross section of an old cedar, it makes for interesting study. You will find periods of very slow growth, wherein the rings are extremely close together. Conversely, periods of rapid growth, which usually indicates a wetter and warmer period, will be farther apart.
You may find these time capsules extend over many decades.
When we first came here in '96, there was a huge round washed up at the head of the bay here. It had 486 rings. So a fairly old tree, but nowhere near as old as they will grow. There was one stretch of rings that extended for over 100 years at less than 1/32" per ring.
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Old 01-19-2009, 09:58 PM   #127
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Gulf Island Building.


In the picture of the samples above, you will see both young and old wood, flat cut, 45 cut and edge cut. There is no finish on these pieces. This is right out of the planer.
When applying a finish, the edge cut boards will show the most consistency, while the flat cut will show off the wilder grain patterns. So, depending on what you are doing, you can cut the wood to suit the job. Comes in handy sometimes to be able to do that.
Until a finish is applied, red cedar tends to look rather bland.
I'm waiting for some varnish to dry on 100+ boards, and when it is I will show you a pic of pieces similar to the above for comparison. The colors really pop with varnish.
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:55 PM   #128
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Gulf Island Building.


I was so happy to finally have all the long boards varnished for the back of the kitchen counter that I almost forgot to take a picture of them varnished before they got nailed on.
So here are just a random few that I quickly got a pic of.
Now perhaps it is a little clearer where they got the name Red cedar from.
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Old 01-21-2009, 10:58 PM   #129
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Gulf Island Building.


This is not the long curved counter in the middle of the kitchen, this one separates the kitchen from what we call the breakfast nook. Although right now it is full of piles of wood and floor tiles.
Before I put the cedar on the back side of the cabinet, I added four rows of backing so there was something to glue and nail to.
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:00 PM   #130
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Gulf Island Building.


And here are the first few boards on and also the glue spread ready for the next batch. It was a bit of a messy job.
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:02 PM   #131
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Gulf Island Building.


And in what seemed like only a few minutes the whole lot were up. Hope the wife likes it!
Still have a shorter section to do on the other side of the steps. Just a bit under 3 feet I think it is.
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:09 PM   #132
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Gulf Island Building.


I made the boards for that counter a little over length, just in case. Then I trimmed them flush with the plywood top using a Japanese saw.
The top of this and the adjoining cabinet on the other side of the steps will be covered with arbutus wood. At least that is the plan at the moment.
When we first came here, there was a twin trunk arbutus about 90' high which had been dead for perhaps 15 or 20 years. Hard to say how long.
It went, but I kept some of the logs from it, and then when I got the sawmill the logs were turned into boards. I still have most of them.
Didn't have any idea what the wood was going to be used for at the time, but this seems like a decent purpose.
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:22 PM   #133
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Gulf Island Building.


Managed to get the second cabinet back done today, and added a plywood top as backing for the arbutus wood.
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:24 PM   #134
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Gulf Island Building.


Ignore the short boards at the bottom. There is going to be a built in cabinet against the wall.
Here's a better perspective of how both look.
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:25 PM   #135
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Gulf Island Building.


Trimming off the extra board length with the Japanese saw.
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