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Old 06-08-2010, 10:06 AM   #1306
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Gulf Island Building.


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Originally Posted by jlhaslip View Post
Oh! Look... shiny stuff... Nice!
Hah! You think it's shiny now...just wait 'til I polish it up!!
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Old 06-08-2010, 04:07 PM   #1307
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And while I was at it, I also got a specialty blade for natural stone, specifically marble and granite.
Have a blade similar to that one and it's a helluva blade.

Two years ago I installed a front entry porch with radii steps. Black brick pavers were used. After trying every trick in my saw-blade-bank and still not being able to cut those damned bricks I turned to my trusty diamond blade supplier who immediately laughed at me. Apparently he was familiar with those bricks and my issues with them. He said I'll send you something to try and if it works call me back and I'll send you an invoice for it.

The blade was here the next day (bless his sole) and it cut those bricks like it was cutting a loaf of bread. It's an amazing tool for sure. Just so happens he also supplies diamond blades to the brick refractory that made the bricks to begin with so he had an inside track.

Well poop!!! That picture was taken with my cell phone then emailed to me, then saved to my pictures, now it's itty bitty and a (PNG) whatever that is, and I have no idea how to fix all of that. I did manage to change it to JPEG for posting here but I have no idea how to enlarge it.
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Old 06-08-2010, 07:37 PM   #1308
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Gulf Island Building.


I'm always glad to get a good report on something after I buy it...usually it's the other way around.

I tried grabbing your image to resize, but as soon as I blow it up it pixelates like nobody's business. I think your basic image size was something like 92 x 72 or whatever, so that's pretty tiny.

If you have any other version of it, you could try emailing it to me and I'll see what happens - I use Imagewell for my resizing.
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Old 06-09-2010, 11:18 AM   #1309
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Gulf Island Building.


...another question for you Bud.

The wife wanted tile put on the steps in this pic. Before I did the solarium floor I pooh pooh'd the idea, mainly because I didn't think I would be able to do it. But since trying the floor and discovering that if you have the best tile guy on the planet available for help it isn't so bad, I might give it a go.

It was your pic of the steps you did that put that idea forward. So, if I mess up, you know who's going to get blamed, don't you?

I guess I would cut narrow strips of tile for the curved faces, then do some sort of fan shape for the steps. I'm hoping that I can make a small overhanging lip - maybe 1/4" to 3/8" - on the outside of the treads, and then shape that round.

I will use the 12 by 12 tiles to make this from.

Am I on the right track?
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:35 PM   #1310
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The wife wanted tile put on the steps in this pic. Before I did the solarium floor I pooh pooh'd the idea, mainly because I didn't think I would be able to do it. But since trying the floor and discovering that if you have the best tile guy on the planet available for help it isn't so bad, I might give it a go.
Well I'll tell ya...

On Internet forums addressing DIY'ers I am usually the first person to discourage anyone from installing clay/ceramic/stone tile on wood structured steps. That's not to say it can't be done and be done successfully. I'm embarrassed to tell you how many times I have done it and yet tell folks on the Internet not to do so.

Steps/stairs can be dubious animals as you well know. The things are usually built to a minimum standard (if any kind of standard at all is used) and they move. We all know movement/deflection is a deal-killer for tile installations.

However, I now know a little bit about the husband of the wife wanting the stairs to be tiled and something tells me if anyone can HE CAN.

It really depends on how the steps were structured. If they are solid with no deflection there may be no issues whatsoever.

As we know steps are subject to forces one wouldn't really think about. I don't know the science of this but I do know a two hundred pound guy coming down a set of steps in deliberate fashion can probably exert a momentary stress of several hundred pounds per square inch. Going up is a different story.

I would fully trust your judgement as to whether or not this is a good idea. I think it probably is.

As far as overhanging the edges, you know those edges will be vulnerable to chipping but usually only if one is banging furniture or something hard up or down the steps. If it were me I would of course tile the risers and flush the stair nose to that end so that the riser tile (and grout) is fully supporting the tile edge of the tread. A round-over or bull-nosing of the tile would work without issue. This would soften the edge and lesson the possibility that something would chip a 90 degree edge at the top otherwise (sharp) corner.

I would also use fiber cement tile backer board and a thinset with some flexibility claims in their documents.

Thanks for the compliment by the way.
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:36 PM   #1311
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Yesterday we sorted out some of the mess in the studio - where the t/c tiles have been for years. It turns out that we have enough of the octagonal tiles to do either the front entrance or the breakfast nook. In either case we would be stuck with quite a few octagonal tiles with no particular place to put them.

Last night while I was hunting for pictures of t/c installations, I spotted one which had some 6 x 12 tiles used as a border. Bingo!

If I did that here, there would be enough of the octagonal tiles to do both the floors in question, as the border tiles would use up something like 42 square feet of floor.

The nook will be done first, and the area right around the step seemed to be the logical place to start.

After some contemplation, I figured the middle of the step would be first - then just work out to each side.

And BTW, this is not a half circle - that would be too easy. No, this is half an oval, a different kettle of fish entirely.

First thing - find the middle of the outside of the step.
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Last edited by cocobolo; 06-10-2010 at 12:45 AM. Reason: missing a word
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:40 PM   #1312
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Well I'll tell ya...






I would also use fiber cement tile backer board and a thinset with some flexibility claims in their documents.

Thanks for the compliment by the way.
Does Fiberock qualify or do I need the regular CBU?

And you're more than welcome.

Our posts crossed within a minute of each other.
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:51 PM   #1313
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Bud, just FYI, when I built this place, I did not have any of the beams downstairs on greater than a 7' spacing.

Some of the floor joists are in fan shapes, anything else does not exceed 16". I am always in favour of exceeding the code when it comes to framing.

We had in mind doing considerable tiling before the design was even drawn, so the framing was well overbuilt, and I have never regretted it.

Those steps you see are not stairs in the true sense of the word. Each is built on top of the other so the weight is transferred right down to the main floor - which is two layers thick.

Bull nosing was the expression I was looking for...I just think it looks a little bit better than having a flush edge between the facing and the tread surface.

Any furniture coming in to this room will be via the door to the back deck.

Any furniture to the remainder of the house will enter either through the front door - or more likely through the double french doors.

And any 200 pound clod trying to race around my house will be summarily ejected out into the bay!
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:56 PM   #1314
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OK, continuing from post 1313, I then transferred the line to the floor, and using a straightedge and my infallible eyeball, continued the line out away from the step.

Now I had a centreline from which to start the floor tile.
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:56 PM   #1315
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Gulf Island Building.


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And BTW, this is not a half circle - that would be too easy. No, this is half an oval,
I might have known!!!!


Quote:
Does Fiberock qualify or do I need the regular CBU?
Absolutely!

Ok back to the half-oval thing. Iffin' it wasin' me....

I think I would saw the tiles only (in range) of the front edge and allow a slight overhang (after considering the riser-tile thickness. THEN use a belt sander to do a final shaping of the radius. (Is the still called a radius?)

I'm thinking I would also use a temporary filler of some kind to use as a sacrificial-face for sanding on the front edge of the tiles making the radius. Maybe a couple pieces of Fiberock or whatever would bend.

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Old 06-09-2010, 04:58 PM   #1316
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I put tiles around the step, and measured the spaces between the outside edges of the tiles. Because this was an oval, the spacing grew larger towards the ends. Then I made myself up some small boards from 1" wide to 1 5/8" wide to draw cut lines on the tiles.
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Old 06-09-2010, 05:00 PM   #1317
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Using an appropriate spacer - one which was just bigger than the space at the outer edge of the tiles - I then drew lines on the tile for cutting.
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Old 06-09-2010, 05:06 PM   #1318
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have been following your progress, but haven't commented for awile. Have you considered a wood bullnose across the front and then inlaying tile on the treads. Could be a nice look with less chance of chipping on the edge. Just a thought but then again I'm a plumber.
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Old 06-09-2010, 05:10 PM   #1319
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I might have known!!!!



Absolutely!

Ok back to the half-oval thing. Iffin' it wasin' me....

I think I would saw the tiles only (in range) of the front edge and allow a slight overhang (after considering the riser-tile thickness. THEN use a belt sander to do a final shaping of the radius. (Is the still called a radius?)

I'm thinking I would also use a temporary filler of some kind to use as a sacrificial-face for sanding on the front edge of the tiles making the radius. Maybe a couple pieces of Fiberock or whatever would bend.
OK, I see what you mean. That way you would be far less likely to get any chipping at the edges of the tile. I could always use a piece of Fiberock as a temporary spacer so I would know that it would fit.
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Old 06-09-2010, 05:19 PM   #1320
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have been following your progress, but haven't commented for awile. Have you considered a wood bullnose across the front and then inlaying tile on the treads. Could be a nice look with less chance of chipping on the edge. Just a thought but then again I'm a plumber.
No actually, that's the one thing I didn't consider.

I did spend a few years in the boatbuilding game, so something like that might be a possibility. But there is one trouble with that which leaves me a little nervous.

Wood and masonry - of whatever kind - are dis-similar materials. And such materials should rightfully have some kind of flashing between them.

This is a round in which the masonry will come out ahead, and the wood will eventually lose.

Of course, originally, before wife number two decided how much she liked the solarium floor, these two steps were going to be done in hardwood.

I am mindful of the potential damage which could occur on the tile, but I think - at this point - it is a risk I am willing to take.

Not to mention the fact that Bud has brought up the idea of finding a thinset with some flexibility to it. Aside from absorbing some of the point load, it may have some shock absorbing ability. I guess we will find out.
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