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Old 11-01-2012, 01:23 PM   #7066
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Actually there is yet another style available. A third style is also a surface-mount that hangs on a metal clip screwed to the wall. The dish itself has a "V"-groove either cut or cast into the back of the dish that slips into the metal clip. Those are kind of a pain in the butt to install. After installation (no matter which is used) you would then caulk around the edges to keep moisture out and to supplement the attachment process.



Absolutely yes.

Here's the basic deal. Today's world of tile sees an awful lot of porcelain tile being used. Porcelain tile is the least absorptive tile of all (basically) with an absorption rate of one-half-of-one percent when it comes to water. It only then stands to reason that if the tile won't absorb water it also won't necessarily absorb adhesive. If the tile has a glazed surface the issue is only magnified. Roughing the tile surface will help. In fact the more-course the "roughing-up" is the more surface area that is created for the adhesive to bond to.

It all has to do with creating the necessary "cohesive" ability of the materials to be joined.
Thanks Bud, that is a big help. I have an engraving tool that should do well to rough up the surface, I appreciate that.

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Old 11-01-2012, 01:28 PM   #7067
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Done deal, our son's F-I-L is an artist who draws nothing but the old locomotives, he gave us one of his drawings of the old Chattanooga Choo Choo, he is good.

.
Thanks Jim, you just never know who you are going to bump into who has an interest in the old steam engines. I bet he knows plenty of other people with that same interest Jim.

I bet if you send the link over to him he will be able to help us out immensely. I cannot thank you all enough for helping.

I now understand that if we are able to get the engine project up to top spot the sponsor will donate up to $100,000 towards the rebuilding. That would be absolutely incredible!
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Old 11-01-2012, 01:30 PM   #7068
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Thanks Bud, that is a big help. I have an engraving tool that should do well to rough up the surface, I appreciate that.
Jim, depending on the area you want to rough up a standard 4 1/2" grinder works well and only takes a minute or so. I put one of the small diamond blades in mine for that purpose.
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Old 11-01-2012, 02:01 PM   #7069
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I have an engraving tool that should do well to rough up the surface,
Be careful with using that method. Keith's idea is really the best way to do it. Percussion tools used on tile and grout installations almost always end in disaster. I have seen tile crack and grout become loose from people using something like a hammer drill to drill a hole in tile. I NEVER use percussion on any tile installation.

I know a small engraving tool probably isn't too aggressive but I doubt it will do that good of a job and risks of damage are high.
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Old 11-01-2012, 03:26 PM   #7070
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I hadn't thought about that, it could loosen the tile or grout or crack it.

Keith that would be easier to use the grinder than the engraver, I didn't think of that either, that is why you two make the big bucks. Thanks to both of you.

I will send him the link, I am sure he will jump on that. He also helped design the old Hemi engine back then, he was a design engineer at Chrysler. I just remembered that Tom lived in Canada for years. Here is a link to his site, Tom Rock Productions.
http://rockontrains.us/
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Old 11-01-2012, 03:39 PM   #7071
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that is why you two make the big bucks.

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Old 11-01-2012, 03:48 PM   #7072
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I was hooking up the ABS drain this morning, when the tailpiece came off the sink. Just fell off.

It seems there was hardly any thread on the chrome section.

I could hardly believe my good luck (that's a switch) when I found another one in the house.

Take a look at the two different threaded ends, no comparison. The one I found went right in no problem.
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Old 11-01-2012, 03:50 PM   #7073
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The brand of the original is American Standard, something I have bought many times over the years.

When I checked where it was made you can probably guess..... beautiful downtown Shanghai! Mind you, the new piece was probably made in China as well.
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Old 11-01-2012, 04:08 PM   #7074
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I was hooking up the ABS drain this morning, when the tailpiece came off the sink. Just fell off.

It seems there was hardly any thread on the chrome section.

I could hardly believe my good luck (that's a switch) when I found another one in the house.

Take a look at the two different threaded ends, no comparison. The one I found went right in no problem.
That is unreal, some one must have made that one about 10 minutes before quitting time.
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Old 11-01-2012, 09:44 PM   #7075
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You guys may enjoy this video I found on You Tube. This is Union Pacifics Engine 844 travelling at seventy-five miles per hour. Nebraskans get to see this ole girl every once-in-a-while. She was here this year again. Coming from her home in Cheyenne Wyoming and approaching Grand Island Nebraska from the west she began whistlin' about seven miles west of town and there was no mistakin' what you were hearing. She rolled into the UP yard where she stayed for a couple of days before moving on east. This is an amazing old machine.

Notice the late-model diesel engine unit a couple of cars back. The diesel engine is her insurance if anything serious breaks down on the road.

More interesting is the fireman standing between 844 and the coal tender, watch that guy bounce going seventy-five miles per hour. Would you ride there?

This kind of stuff gets me choked up every time.

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Old 11-01-2012, 09:55 PM   #7076
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This is kind of interesting too...

Nebraska is home to the world's largest rail-yard (Bailey Yard). Complete hump-yard and maintenance facilities with turn-table.

A few years ago they built an eight-story building in the yard that resembles a rail road spike. At the top is an observation deck where you can view the entire yard and all of the activities. The car humping is done with diesel engines that are remotely controlled from an onsite control center but some of the activities are remotely controlled from Omaha Nebraska from what I understand. This is an amazing place to visit.

http://www.goldenspiketower.com/bailey_yard.php
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Old 11-01-2012, 09:57 PM   #7077
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Bud, have you ever seen any of the 4000 series Union Pacific Big Boys?

The engine in your video is a 4 - 8 - 4, meaning it has 8 driving wheels. The U.P. Big Boys were a 4 - 8 - 8 - 4, the biggest engines ever built. I believe (if my memory serves) that they were numbered from 4001 to 4025. They were built to move mountains of coal out of West Virginia.
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Old 11-01-2012, 10:15 PM   #7078
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Not sure what I've seen to tell you the truth. I have seen one larger than this one here about ten or twelve years ago but have no idea what it was.

These things are abundant in Nebraska but they are most all static and in parks and museums. Hell old railroad engines in Nebraska are like old Army Tanks and Jet Fighter Airplanes everywhere else. Unfortunately way too many of them have seen the cutting torch over the years and are now probably high-rise buildings or automobile frames.
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Old 11-01-2012, 11:43 PM   #7079
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Just a little hint for all you DIY plumbers out there...for years I have been using one of those small butane bottle kits. I guess it has always worked, but a couple of years ago I bought a new Bernz-O-matic torch with a bit more oomph. I only just undid the package a few days ago.

What a difference. It has a built in lighter which works like a charm. It is obviously much hotter and will allow a joint to be soldered in between 20 and 35 seconds depending on how much copper you are heating up and the flame is much more concentrated. This was a big plus for me because I needed to do some soldering fairly close to a wood wall. Not even a hint of any burning. And one more thing, you can twist the angle of the tip which makes it very easy to get at the area to be soldered very easily.

No, I don't sell them, just happy with the product.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:30 AM   #7080
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Bud, I remember way back when I was a kid living way back out in the sticks. On a clear, crispy cold morning when the wind was still, you could hear the old steam engines way off back down in the hollers just huffin and puffin and blowing their whistles. That was such a comforting sound then and I still love to hear it when I can now days.

Keith, is that Mapps gas you got? That is a neat set up there, I have a torch that I just pull the trigger and it lights up but the tip doesn't turn like yours, I can see where that would come in handy.

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