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Old 10-09-2010, 02:29 PM   #2956
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Gulf Island Building.


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Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
FWIW!!!! (If anyone cares)

Typically when a sealer that has been applied to a stone surface turns milky or white (flashes) it would be a sign of moisture content of the stone. This isn't necessarily the only cause of 'flashing' but in general terms would be the primary suspect.

Stone used on a buildings interior would be less likely to flash (if allowed ample time to dry from the moisture introduced by the adhesive) unless of course it (the stone) had been applied to an exterior wall. Stone applied to an exterior wall would/could always (then) be susceptible to some moisture content comings and goings.

Typically sealers/finishes/coatings being applied to (interior) stone installations should be a product manufactured specifically for that purpose. Most all stone sealers are made to be "vapor transmissive" so-as to allow any moisture accumulating on the backside to eventually escape via the evaporation process through the front side.
Varnishes and polyurethanes would not qualify necessarily qualify (IF) the possibility of moisture migration is present from a source other than the surface.

How in the world a liquid sealer applied to a surface can possibly be vapor-transmissive escapes my personal ability to reason - but, that's what they do.

Once again I have exhausted my knowledge of this subject. Now, if the stone has not been applied to an exterior wall, and has had sufficient time to dry, then I have have no idea what the hell has happened.
Sorry Bud, I missed your post there.

The missus actually grabbed the wrong can entirely when she came back from her break...the first stuff she used was just fine. The slate had been dry for ages when the finish was put on, but I can certainly see that any moisture trapped could cause that problem.

She has finally deigned to come over to the house today and has given her 75% approval. That's about as good a rating as I could ever expect from her, so I'm happy.
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Old 10-09-2010, 04:46 PM   #2957
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Gulf Island Building.


Whew! Time flies when you're having fun, doesn't it?

The missus has been painting some of the trims I made for the doors a few days ago. It seems the only door that will be varnished now will be the one presently being made for the master bedroom.

I have several of the drawers in clamps right now on the bench, and as soon as lunch is done I'll get some pics.
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Old 10-09-2010, 05:14 PM   #2958
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Gulf Island Building.


Most of you know my liking for the Japanese handsaws...with a little practice, they are deadly accurate.

The drawers going in the main cabinet have different angles across their fronts, and I found the easiest way to make the drawer was to cut the plywood for the bottom first, then fit everything else (front, back and sides) around that.

This does mean that the front and sides need to have the appropriate angle cut.

You can split a thin pencil line with the pull saws...like so.
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Old 10-09-2010, 05:15 PM   #2959
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This shows the typical amount the drawers are away from being square.
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Old 10-09-2010, 05:16 PM   #2960
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First small drawer carcase...sitting loose, not glued up yet.
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Last edited by cocobolo; 10-09-2010 at 11:20 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-09-2010, 05:19 PM   #2961
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The small pile of drawer parts from one sheet of 3/4" plywood...plus the bottoms from 3/8" ply.
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Old 10-09-2010, 05:22 PM   #2962
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Here's the first five drawer carcasses glued up and clamped to the bench. I trust that will keep them square while they dry.
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Old 10-09-2010, 07:34 PM   #2963
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It looks like you have things going your way, they shouldn't warp clamped to your work table like that for sure. You have another tool I have been wanting, a Japanese Saw, they are some really fine tools and they make great chisels also.

I know some will call me lazy but I hate making dovetail drawers, The only time I made them is when my customers asked for them. I truly feel they are a waste of time, I am sure some will disagree with me, everyone has their own way of thinking, I guess.
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Old 10-09-2010, 07:41 PM   #2964
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It looks like you have things going your way, they shouldn't warp clamped to your work table like that for sure. You have another tool I have been wanting, a Japanese Saw, they are some really fine tools and they make great chisels also.

I know some will call me lazy but I hate making dovetail drawers, The only time I made them is when my customers asked for them. I truly feel they are a waste of time, I am sure some will disagree with me, everyone has their own way of thinking, I guess.
There are still a few manufacturers who make dovetail drawers today, few and far between. Even with the automated processes available, it still adds to the expense considerably.

Today's consumers - who are basically only interested in quick, cheap and throwaway products - aren't often interested in paying more for the better quality product. Even though in the end it's usually worth it.

Besides, I would have needed to use solid lumber if it was going to be dovetailed construction. I do have the jigs and bits, but even with that, the time is still considerably greater to make using that method.
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Old 10-09-2010, 08:38 PM   #2965
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There are still a few manufacturers who make dovetail drawers today, few and far between. Even with the automated processes available, it still adds to the expense considerably.

Today's consumers - who are basically only interested in quick, cheap and throwaway products - aren't often interested in paying more for the better quality product. Even though in the end it's usually worth it.

Besides, I would have needed to use solid lumber if it was going to be dovetailed construction. I do have the jigs and bits, but even with that, the time is still considerably greater to make using that method.
That is the way I build my drawers, with plywood. I am not knocking dove tail drawers, they are a sign of quality but they are unnecessary to me, but that is just me.

One thing I did on many of the cabinets I built was to make the shelving in the base cabinets pull outs like drawers, it makes it easier to reach things in the back.
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:06 PM   #2966
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That is the way I build my drawers, with plywood. I am not knocking dove tail drawers, they are a sign of quality but they are unnecessary to me, but that is just me.

One thing I did on many of the cabinets I built was to make the shelving in the base cabinets pull outs like drawers, it makes it easier to reach things in the back.
Nothing wrong with plywood drawers Jim.

Here's two of the dovetail jigs and bits I have.
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:15 PM   #2967
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I got a box full of the full extension slides for the drawers, and if the missus decides that it's too awkward to get at the back of the shelves at the bottom, then I can do the same thing as you did Jim.

We were thinking about that anyway, and for the relatively small amount of materials it's no big deal to put in. I have to get more plywood anyway to finish the drawers, so what's another sheet?

These slides will carry a 100 lb. load per pair.
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:27 PM   #2968
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Will you add screws or nails to the drawers for added strength?
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:35 PM   #2969
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Will you add screws or nails to the drawers for added strength?
Yes...the drawers are all fitted together with dadoes so the wood can't go anywhere, then it is glued and nailed.
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:46 PM   #2970
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Nothing wrong with plywood drawers Jim.

Here's two of the dovetail jigs and bits I have.
It would take me a little while to figure out how to set your jig, mine has the clamps where both the front and side are cut at the same time. I guess the main reason I don't like the dove tails is setting the cutter. It has to be right on as there is no forgiveness with that bad boy.

Buddy, you got the high dollar slides but if you want the drawers to fully extend that is the ones to use and you are right, they are heavy duty. I like that type of slide as it is easy to mount but then the other slides are easy also.
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