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Old 10-08-2010, 07:10 PM   #2941
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Gulf Island Building.


Some time back, wife number 2 decided that she wanted some sort of finish on the slate tiles around the two wood stoves. No problem...so far.

She did the finish on the walls in the breakfast nook. No problem...so far.

Next she tackled the second wood stove area. No Problem...so far.

However, before she was quite finished the second one, she took a short break. No problem...so far.

She doesn't quite know what happened next, but about half a dozen of the tiles came out a horrible milky colour - obviously something was not quite right in China. Problem.

Yesterday, after having looked at these tiles for quite long enough, she attempted to remove the finish. It was a polyurethane product. Any of you who know this stuff are aware that it is pretty tough and not the easiest thing to get off.

In any event, we have the goods for removal, but for whatever reason it didn't seem to work well. She tried to re-apply her finish of choice today, and while there was some improvement, it wasn't nearly good enough.

Fortunately, she only gets these flashes of brilliance on rare occasions, and thus it was left up to me to fix the problem. Her first suggestion was that I remove the tiles in question with some new ones.

My immediate request for her to vacate the house before I could find a suitable weapon of destruction with which to inflict serious bodily harm on her person resulted in her extremely rapid departure. Following which I brought out the heavy artillery in the form of a grinder to get rid of the ugliness.

She will now be invited - very politely I might add - to have yet another go at completing her finishing attempt.

This is after the grinder attack had taken place.
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Old 10-08-2010, 07:34 PM   #2942
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Originally Posted by cocobolo View Post
I saw your weather forecast and it looks good for tonight.

Speaking of grains of sand, here's a little tidbit for you.

If you were to hold a grain of sand out at arm's length - well, that is the area that Hubble viewed for both the deep field and ultra deep field pictures. To think that in an area that small there exists literally hundreds of other galaxies, never mind just planets, is truly mind boggling.

The light from those other galaxies has been traveling for over 13 billion years to reach the Hubble sensors.
You are right, that is totally mind boggling. Just going outside and looking at the stars on a moonless night out away from the lights of the city makes me feel ever so small, there is just no way to grasp the magnitude of outer space. The info about the Hubble is just unreal.

I will go outside after while and see if I can see the Double Clusters and then the comet.
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Old 10-08-2010, 07:38 PM   #2943
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To get a visual perspective check this out. http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/n...p&code=MR80002
Thanks DD, we appreciate the link.
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Old 10-08-2010, 08:09 PM   #2944
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Some time back, wife number 2 decided that she wanted some sort of finish on the slate tiles around the two wood stoves. No problem...so far.

She did the finish on the walls in the breakfast nook. No problem...so far.

Next she tackled the second wood stove area. No Problem...so far.

However, before she was quite finished the second one, she took a short break. No problem...so far.

She doesn't quite know what happened next, but about half a dozen of the tiles came out a horrible milky colour - obviously something was not quite right in China. Problem.

Yesterday, after having looked at these tiles for quite long enough, she attempted to remove the finish. It was a polyurethane product. Any of you who know this stuff are aware that it is pretty tough and not the easiest thing to get off.

In any event, we have the goods for removal, but for whatever reason it didn't seem to work well. She tried to re-apply her finish of choice today, and while there was some improvement, it wasn't nearly good enough.

Fortunately, she only gets these flashes of brilliance on rare occasions, and thus it was left up to me to fix the problem. Her first suggestion was that I remove the tiles in question with some new ones.

My immediate request for her to vacate the house before I could find a suitable weapon of destruction with which to inflict serious bodily harm on her person resulted in her extremely rapid departure. Following which I brought out the heavy artillery in the form of a grinder to get rid of the ugliness.

She will now be invited - very politely I might add - to have yet another go at completing her finishing attempt.

This is after the grinder attack had taken place.
That is some pretty slate, that is going to look sharp behind your stove. I wonder why the finish whited out like that.

Buddy, if you get "How it is made" on TV up your way, check out the way they made some curved cabinet doors. I kick myself for not thinking of that. It should be on later tonight up your way.
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Old 10-08-2010, 09:04 PM   #2945
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That is some pretty slate, that is going to look sharp behind your stove. I wonder why the finish whited out like that.

Buddy, if you get "How it is made" on TV up your way, check out the way they made some curved cabinet doors. I kick myself for not thinking of that. It should be on later tonight up your way.
Not to tell tales out of school...but wife number 2 picked up the wrong can on her return. Ooops!

I haven't heard of "How it is made"...but then I'm not much of a TV watcher. I will ask the missus to see if she knows of it. She is very well versed on the subject.
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Old 10-08-2010, 09:28 PM   #2946
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Coco's astronomy tip of the day (No. 4)

Let's talk magnitude's.

When we speak of magnitude in astronomical terms, we are referring to the apparent brightness - or faintness as the case may be - of an astronomical object.

It could be the moon, a planet, a star or indeed even the sun.

Nearly 2,000 years ago, a Greek astronomer by the name of Hipparchus devised a system to methodically rate the brightness of a celestial object. He considered that the brightest stars should be first magnitude and the faintest detectable by the human eye as sixth magnitude.

Since then the numbers have been added to - remember there were no telescopes in the days of Hipparchus, so he could not see any fainter stars.

Today, the scale goes from +30 to -30. Perhaps oddly, the plus numbers are the dullest objects, while the minus numbers are the brighter ones.

With each numerical change of 1, either plus or minus, the change in brightness is 2 1/2 times. Therefore a first magnitude star is very nearly 100 times brighter than a sixth magnitude star.

Some examples.

The brightest star in the night sky is Sirius at magnitude -1. Venus is up to -4, a full moon is -12 to -13, the sun is -27.

The human eye can detect down to magnitude 6 without optical aid, given a clear, moonless sky. Good binoculars will increase that to about magnitude 9. An 8" telescope will get you down to magnitude 13. The 8" scopes are about the most popular size, striking a balance between cost, weight and ease of use.

The big guns in Hawaii, the Keck telescopes for example, have mirrors which stretch 10 meters across. The combination of something the size of the Keck's and CCD imaging can boost the magnitude to 27. Only Hubble and it's kind can exceed that. And to do so it takes photographic exposures which may run to a week or more.
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Old 10-08-2010, 10:15 PM   #2947
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Keith, that is really interesting, that is kinda strange the way they have the brightness numbered. I'm headed outside, back later.

I did find the Double Clusters but there is just too much light out in the front yard and too many trees out back to see well. My binoculars are not real good either. I think soon Judy and I will go up on one of the mountains around here and see what we can see from there.
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Old 10-08-2010, 10:55 PM   #2948
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Keith, that is really interesting, that is kinda strange the way they have the brightness numbered. I'm headed outside, back later.

I did find the Double Clusters but there is just too much light out in the front yard and too many trees out back to see well. My binoculars are not real good either. I think soon Judy and I will go up on one of the mountains around here and see what we can see from there.
Well done Jim!!

As soon as you get away from the city lights, the skies will open up for you.

The clusters are both about magnitude 4. (4.3 and 4.4)

If you go for the comet, what you will be looking for is a faint fuzzball. If you have a tripod that you can sit the binocs on, you should be able to find it. Don't look for anything big - it's going to be very small.
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:39 PM   #2949
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The missus opted to let me try the refinish on the tiles...chicken.
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:41 PM   #2950
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Rapidly closing in on the kitchen countertop.

Now that all the pieces have been found, I will start on the top gluing tomorrow.
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Old 10-09-2010, 01:11 AM   #2951
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Wow, the color really came through on your slate, that is sharp.

The kitchen is going to be interesting, cabinets and kitchen things are some of my favorite things.
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Old 10-09-2010, 09:40 AM   #2952
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Jim: I did ask the missus last night if she has heard of the "How it is made" show. No, she had not.

I searched it, and it seems that there are all sorts of episodes out there, but I couldn't specifically find one on the curved doors.

But in any event, I am only planning on doing straight drawer fronts and doors anyway.
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Old 10-09-2010, 11:57 AM   #2953
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Jim: I did ask the missus last night if she has heard of the "How it is made" show. No, she had not.

I searched it, and it seems that there are all sorts of episodes out there, but I couldn't specifically find one on the curved doors.

But in any event, I am only planning on doing straight drawer fronts and doors anyway.
Keith, I do remember you saying you were building straight doors, (hard to believe I know) I just thought you might like to see how they made the curved doors and frames. it was very simple, a lot of work but simple.

I hope you have a super day buddy.

I did find the episode for the curved doors but I couldn't find where the video played, here is the name of the episode if you want to try to get it to work,

Episode 12
Learn how air boats, onions, 3D metal printing and curved cabinet doors are made.
It is on the Science Channel
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Old 10-09-2010, 12:47 PM   #2954
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FWIW!!!! (If anyone cares)

Typically when a sealer that has been applied to a stone surface turns milky or white (flashes) it would be a sign of moisture content of the stone. This isn't necessarily the only cause of 'flashing' but in general terms would be the primary suspect.

Stone used on a buildings interior would be less likely to flash (if allowed ample time to dry from the moisture introduced by the adhesive) unless of course it (the stone) had been applied to an exterior wall. Stone applied to an exterior wall would/could always (then) be susceptible to some moisture content comings and goings.

Typically sealers/finishes/coatings being applied to (interior) stone installations should be a product manufactured specifically for that purpose. Most all stone sealers are made to be "vapor transmissive" so-as to allow any moisture accumulating on the backside to eventually escape via the evaporation process through the front side.
Varnishes and polyurethanes would not qualify necessarily qualify (IF) the possibility of moisture migration is present from a source other than the surface.

How in the world a liquid sealer applied to a surface can possibly be vapor-transmissive escapes my personal ability to reason - but, that's what they do.

Once again I have exhausted my knowledge of this subject. Now, if the stone has not been applied to an exterior wall, and has had sufficient time to dry, then I have have no idea what the hell has happened.
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:24 PM   #2955
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I think before the top goes on the curved counter that I should make the drawer carcasses. So, to that end I have been cutting up the plywood this morning to do just that.

There is a slight hitch in that the drawer fronts will be at varying angles as we travel around the inside of the curve.

There are only 4 possible spaces that drawers will be able to fit on that main counter, so it isn't quite that bad.

I should have some pics later to show at least some of the process I went through.

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