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Old 10-01-2010, 06:57 PM   #2806
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Well, I'm glad to say the gutter has come up as white as snow again. Nice warm sunshine to dry it out and sun again tomorrow - so they say.

Also stained the back of the missus'es studio. She has been telling me she was going to do it for about 6 or 7 years now. She has a master's degree - in procrastination.

Also stained the back of the water tanks and the fascia board on the back of the woodshed.

And now I think I might try staining the outside of the top gutter, while the sun is still out. I took a critical look at it from the ground, and it's looking a little pasty.
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Old 10-01-2010, 07:51 PM   #2807
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That's it for another year of staining. Whatever isn't done now can wait until next spring.

I realize it doesn't show up much in the pic, but this is what has been stained. It's about 16'+ off the ground, and is done by leaning over the edge of the roof and praying that the brush covers everything. I'll take it the way it is.

Now the hunt is on to see if I can find some stock to make the bedroom door from.
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Old 10-01-2010, 08:17 PM   #2808
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Well, I'm glad to say the gutter has come up as white as snow again. Nice warm sunshine to dry it out and sun again tomorrow - so they say.

Also stained the back of the missus'es studio. She has been telling me she was going to do it for about 6 or 7 years now. She has a master's degree - in procrastination.

Also stained the back of the water tanks and the fascia board on the back of the woodshed.

And now I think I might try staining the outside of the top gutter, while the sun is still out. I took a critical look at it from the ground, and it's looking a little pasty.
Buddy, you were hard at it again today, it would take me a week to do all you do in one day and that is for real. That sure does look good, I see you got your firewood in for the winter, when did you have time to cut your
firewood with all else that you have done.

I am watching the History Channel and they are showing the big trees and mills up around your way. I have heard some of the mills up your way can run 10,000 feet a minute, that is beyond my imagination. They say the skid plates are water cooled to keep the wood from catching fire from the friction. They are showing about the old slow growth heart pine from years ago. I have done my share of remilling that into flooring for some of my jobs and restorations, it is some pretty stuff.
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Old 10-02-2010, 01:20 AM   #2809
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Jim: Wow! I've certainly never heard of any mill producing 10,000 feet a minute...I wonder if it isn't 10K an hour?

I get a small Canadian produced magazine on wood design and construction. If my memory serves me (and we both know how that doesn't always work) I believe they had an article going into some depth on the Gorman Bros. sawmill here in B.C.

There was a fair bit on the current method of production and the level of sophistication that a thoroughly modern sawmill functions at. Let me dig it up and get you some of the facts and figures.

I found it to be extremely interesting.

And as an aside to that, my friend John - our fire chief here - formerly worked in a local sawmill. It didn't have anywhere near the level of sophistication the Gorman mill does. His mill used to process a log every 4 seconds. It would be interesting to know what the average log size was for that kind of speed.

About the fastest I can handle even a small log on my super-duper-ultra-high-speed mill here is half an hour. That's just one log at maybe 50 board feet. Even with two people working one of these mills, they rarely can get over 100 BF an hour.
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Old 10-02-2010, 01:29 AM   #2810
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At one point, I used to keep a few stats on my sawmill production.

The average I got from a log was about 70 BF.

Average daily production - if I worked all day (an 8 hour day) was about 400 BF.

The highest day I ever had was just over 700 BF, but that was exceptional.

If you believe the company literature, the mill is capable of 1,500 BF a day.

That may be possible, maybe, but you would need nice clean logs sitting close to your mill - something impossible for me - and a machine of some sort, backhoe or forklift, to move the logs and finished lumber.

And another thing to remember is that to attain 1,500 BF of production, you would likely need in excess of 2,000 BF of logs in the first place. That in itself would be 6,000 pounds plus that you would be handling every day.
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Old 10-02-2010, 01:34 AM   #2811
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Keith, I more than likely got that wrong, I will do some checking to see also. That is some mighty fast processing 4 seconds a log, that is moving. I just love seeing new and faster things, that is amazing. I will let you know what I find.
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:35 AM   #2812
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Mornin' Jim...the name of the magazine I get is Wood Design & Building, it's one of those high quality small mags you run across from time to time. They only print 4 issues a year.

Issue No. 51, Summer/2010 has the mill article.

This information is about the Gorman Brothers mill up at Westbank in the British Columbia interior.

There are a couple of aerial photos of the operation - which is pretty large and sprawling, but everything seems to be perfectly in place. There is not any sign of a single bit of sawdust anywhere. Every square inch of the property is immaculate. Reminds me of my sawmill area - NOT!

Gorman Bros. started in 1951 and fairly rapidly grew to produce 10 million BF a year. By the early 90's they were up to 60 million BF annually. Their current production is 140 million BF. That in itself is impressive enough, but in this thoroughly modern mill there is no waste at all.

Whatever parts of a log that do not end up as lumber are put to other uses. Planer shavings are used as animal bedding. Sawdust is used to generate heat for their dry kilns. Much is sent to a pulp mill for use in papermaking. In other words, nothing is wasted...even bark has a use.

The machinery used these days is highly sophisticated, perhaps not the least of which is an X-ray machine which reads every log to determine how it will be cut for the best possible yield. Can you imagine having something like that so you knew in advance what was inside your log?

Their blades today are all thin kerf which takes less power to drive (I have long been using thin kerf blades on my tablesaw and sawmill) and cause less waste.

On a 24/7/365 basis, Gorman produces about 16,000 BF an hour which, by any standard, is one big pile of wood. They are also an extremely "Green" operation, controlling their product from seedling to lumber.

The list goes on, but as you can see, this is nothing like Grandpa's sawmill days.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:48 AM   #2813
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Mornin' Jim...the name of the magazine I get is Wood Design & Building, it's one of those high quality small mags you run across from time to time. They only print 4 issues a year.

Issue No. 51, Summer/2010 has the mill article.

This information is about the Gorman Brothers mill up at Westbank in the British Columbia interior.

There are a couple of aerial photos of the operation - which is pretty large and sprawling, but everything seems to be perfectly in place. There is not any sign of a single bit of sawdust anywhere. Every square inch of the property is immaculate. Reminds me of my sawmill area - NOT!

Gorman Bros. started in 1951 and fairly rapidly grew to produce 10 million BF a year. By the early 90's they were up to 60 million BF annually. Their current production is 140 million BF. That in itself is impressive enough, but in this thoroughly modern mill there is no waste at all.

Whatever parts of a log that do not end up as lumber are put to other uses. Planer shavings are used as animal bedding. Sawdust is used to generate heat for their dry kilns. Much is sent to a pulp mill for use in papermaking. In other words, nothing is wasted...even bark has a use.

The machinery used these days is highly sophisticated, perhaps not the least of which is an X-ray machine which reads every log to determine how it will be cut for the best possible yield. Can you imagine having something like that so you knew in advance what was inside your log?

Their blades today are all thin kerf which takes less power to drive (I have long been using thin kerf blades on my tablesaw and sawmill) and cause less waste.

On a 24/7/365 basis, Gorman produces about 16,000 BF an hour which, by any standard, is one big pile of wood. They are also an extremely "Green" operation, controlling their product from seedling to lumber.

The list goes on, but as you can see, this is nothing like Grandpa's sawmill days.
My stars, them people have got their act together big time. That is so very impressive, I love it. Wouldn't you love to take a tour of their place and see all of that happening. At that rate they can produce, not just rip, not just plane but from scratch produce 80 1X4X10' a minute. I have gone back and cannot find where any mill can plane 10,000 feet a minute unless they have many machines doing that. Somewhere my mind must have shorted out again thinking anyone could plane 10,000 feet a minute.

I can't even wrap my mind around a plant producing 16,000 BF an hour. I can remember hauling 5,000 BF of 5/4 rough sawn red oak back to the shop on a trailer and that is a pile of lumber for sure, and a plant producing over three times that in an hour is very very fast.

The lumber company I bought from did the same as the company you are talking about just nowhere on the same scale. I love efficiency an that is one thing I have never been, but I tried. Those folks have taken efficiency to the extremes. Buddy, thanks for going to all that trouble to look that information up for me, I do appreciate it. Now I have got to do some more looking to see what I can find.
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Old 10-02-2010, 02:01 PM   #2814
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Jim...it's no trouble at all...it's my pleasure.

I should be back in a while with the first of the story on the door I will need to make for the bedroom.
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Old 10-02-2010, 05:42 PM   #2815
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I was learning to run a head rig as a sawyer in a mill in Maryland in the early seventies and when my brain could still do complex math calculations while running logs thru the rig . You had to be able to figure your log size, how many boards you would get from a side, the size of cants left if they were part of the order and so on. Meanwhile you had 15 men downstream of the rig to keep busy plus the men in the yard feeding you logs. It was really quite stimulating and fun but your brain was definitly in overdrive for 8hrs. nothing like the footage in computerized mills but very organic. Needless to say my overdrive days are gone but there are days i get it up to 4th gear for short spurts
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:51 PM   #2816
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I was learning to run a head rig as a sawyer in a mill in Maryland in the early seventies and when my brain could still do complex math calculations while running logs thru the rig . You had to be able to figure your log size, how many boards you would get from a side, the size of cants left if they were part of the order and so on. Meanwhile you had 15 men downstream of the rig to keep busy plus the men in the yard feeding you logs. It was really quite stimulating and fun but your brain was definitly in overdrive for 8hrs. nothing like the footage in computerized mills but very organic. Needless to say my overdrive days are gone but there are days i get it up to 4th gear for short spurts
OK...so by "complex math calculations", do I take it that this was something like walking and chewing gum at the same time? No?

Were you cutting softwoods or hardwoods?

4th gear? Heck I think the transmission between my ears has Low and Bull Low only! Well, maybe reverse from time to time.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:00 PM   #2817
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There wasn't a great selection of wood to try and turn into a door, but I did find a handful of arbutus boards which have probably been drying for 6 or 7 years.

Luckily, there was some 1" stock (rough) I could use as a starting point.

The plan is to use some arbutus planed to about 3/4" for the stiles and rails, and sandwiched between them a piece of red cedar around 1/2" thick. I will be aiming for a finished door thickness of 2" give or take.

There is enough rough stock on hand, but it will bear checking once it has been thicknessed. Arbutus is not favourably disposed to staying flat once it is planed. The idea behind laminating the door frame is to attempt to keep it flat.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:02 PM   #2818
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Actually, before I started on the door this morning, I did get the gutter put up on the back of the house.

Now we know it won't rain for a week!
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:03 PM   #2819
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All the arbutus boards were cupped to a greater or lesser degree.

The one I picked to take a shot of was one of the better ones.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:10 PM   #2820
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The best tool for flattening boards (other than a hand plane) is a jointer.

Your thickness planer wants to flatten the board before it gets to the knives thus partially defeating your attempts to take any cup out.

My jointer is only 6" wide, so with the stiles and two of the rails being over that, I was relegated to using the planer.

Before I could do that, it was in desperate need of a new set of blades. The others had been thoroughly beaten into submission over the past few weeks planing red cedar.

Alas, when I checked my blade boxes, all had been used. This made it necessary for me to break out the big sharpener.
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