Gulf Island Building. - Project Showcase - Page 150 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > Project Showcase

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-16-2010, 12:18 AM   #2236
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
More of your pictures posted while I was making a post. That is some awesome timber and so many are so straight. Looking at that bark made me think of cotton wood bark. Do cotton wood trees grow up your way? Some of us wood carvers carve cotton wood bark that grows up north as it is much thicker and carves so smooth, the down side is it cost us around $10 a pound here.

You live in a total different world from here, I don't see many things there that is like down here, except maybe the humming birds. I for one really do appreciate you going to the trouble to make the pictures of the trees for us. Thanks buddy.
Jim:

We do get cottonwood trees here, but they are considered junk trees up this way. I believe they are used for paper making here. About the biggest cottonwood I can remember was over in Aldergrove in the Fraser Valley near where I used to live. The bark was very fissured like the fir, only nowhere near as thick. I would say the cottonwood wasn't any more than 30" through. I doubt that was considered large.

There are lots of trees that reach that easily here, even the arbutus and maples.

Another tree that reaches massive proportions is the hemlock. There are some up north where a person standing alongside the trees looks like an ant!

Advertisement

cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:07 AM   #2237
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,852
Rewards Points: 2,800
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Gulf Island Building.


I remember back in the 70s we could get 1x12 fir fairly easy but as time went on it became harder and harder to get down this way, it has been a while since I have seen fir of any size at all down here.

Back when I was building, my crews and I did most of the work and included stairs, cabinets and trim work. There for a while we were getting a lot of the trim made of Hemlock which I did not like. This was before we had nail guns and had to hand nail. We could drive a 6d finish nail at the bottom of some door trim and a lot of the times it would split from bottom to top. I finally stopped buying trim from those who used Hemlock for that reason. Maybe Hemlock is a much better grade up your way from what we can get down here.

To look at the Hemlock we got, you couldn't tell the looks from Fir but you could sure tell when nailing or machining.

There are cotton woods here also but the bark is nowhere as thick as it is up your way and they are junk trees here also. What type of Pine trees grow up your way? Here in the south Yellow Pine is used a lot for framing as it is really strong. The bad thing with Yellow Pine is if you don't nail it in place quickly it will crawl off. I have never seen a wood twist, curl, warp and check like Yellow Pine. Once it is in place and nailed where it can't move it makes a very strong frame work. I didn't use that if I had a choice either. I liked framing with Spruce, Pine or Fir (not yellow pine).

I would love to see an 8 foot thick tree, that would be a treat to me.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:17 AM   #2238
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 4,403
Rewards Points: 2,342
Default

Gulf Island Building.


The hand rail is looking great. How many coats total will you put on it?

Wow, a tree that's 16' 3" around. It must be huge. You got me thinking about the trees I saw in the Redwood Forest in California. I'll post one of the pictures from there if I can figure out how to work my scanner.
gma2rjc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 11:11 AM   #2239
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
I remember back in the 70s we could get 1x12 fir fairly easy but as time went on it became harder and harder to get down this way, it has been a while since I have seen fir of any size at all down here.

Back when I was building, my crews and I did most of the work and included stairs, cabinets and trim work. There for a while we were getting a lot of the trim made of Hemlock which I did not like. This was before we had nail guns and had to hand nail. We could drive a 6d finish nail at the bottom of some door trim and a lot of the times it would split from bottom to top. I finally stopped buying trim from those who used Hemlock for that reason. Maybe Hemlock is a much better grade up your way from what we can get down here.

To look at the Hemlock we got, you couldn't tell the looks from Fir but you could sure tell when nailing or machining.

There are cotton woods here also but the bark is nowhere as thick as it is up your way and they are junk trees here also. What type of Pine trees grow up your way? Here in the south Yellow Pine is used a lot for framing as it is really strong. The bad thing with Yellow Pine is if you don't nail it in place quickly it will crawl off. I have never seen a wood twist, curl, warp and check like Yellow Pine. Once it is in place and nailed where it can't move it makes a very strong frame work. I didn't use that if I had a choice either. I liked framing with Spruce, Pine or Fir (not yellow pine).

I would love to see an 8 foot thick tree, that would be a treat to me.
The framing lumber we get here is predominantly something they call hem-fir. Of course, there is no such wood, but what that permits the mills to do is to use 85% hemlock and 15% douglas fir.

As a framing lumber, hemlock is OK for the most part. All local framing lumber is graded and dried to 19% moisture content here. The next thing they do is to leave it outside (usually) in the rain. But once the wood has been through the kiln, the actual wall cells have shrunk and the wood is dead.

Air dried wood is completely different. It still has life to it when you hand plane it for example. Kiln dried wood always looks dead and lifeless.

If the fir or hemlock is cut from fairly large trees - which it usually is here - you can see the difference between the two different woods easily. Fir may have small pitch pockets for example, where hemlock will not.

The grain on fir tends to be straighter, and hemlock grain often interlocks. The colour is lighter and a more pale brown in hemlock, whereas the fir may well have a pinkish or much redder tinge to it. If you put the two together it is much more obvious.

And evidently, as with your southern pine, hemlock is best nailed down quickly after being through the kiln. While the kiln does prevent much of the twisting and warping you speak of, once it goes out of whack it is really difficult to get straight again.

Our standard building reference books here use S-P-F as the normal framing lumber (Spruce, Pine, Fir) and grade the woods that way. We do get quite a lot of spruce here, but pine on the coast isn't common.

There are huge stands of pine up in the interior of B. C. Although over the past few years the pine beetle has caused massive amounts of devastation.

My one experience with Southern Longleaf Pine was the installation of bowling lanes over in Langley, B. C. Maple was used for the beginning and ends of the lanes, and the pine was used for the center section.

I was surprised that your pine acts as it does...the Southern Longleaf we got for this job was beautiful wood. Long lengths and completely clear. We used cut nails to fasten the wood together, ever used those before?

You need a big hammer and plenty of muscle.
cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 11:18 AM   #2240
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
The hand rail is looking great. How many coats total will you put on it?

Wow, a tree that's 16' 3" around. It must be huge. You got me thinking about the trees I saw in the Redwood Forest in California. I'll post one of the pictures from there if I can figure out how to work my scanner.
Seven coats...or more if it still isn't good at that point.

There are no really big trees on this island due to lack of rain. But that one is a legitimate old growth.

The island has been logged in the past, perhaps twice. And there was a forest fire which swept the whole island in about 1948. The evidence still shows on some of the blackened bark on the oldest firs.

Some of the California redwoods I think may have been 50 feet or more around.

A few years ago I was reading where there is only 1% of the original old growth redwood population remaining.

Do you remember some of the old highway bridges they built from Redwood? Many of them have been dis-assembled and the wood cut up for resale. Some of the best wood on the planet.
cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to cocobolo For This Useful Post:
BigJim (08-16-2010)
Old 08-16-2010, 11:51 AM   #2241
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,852
Rewards Points: 2,800
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Most of the framing lumber we get down here comes from Canada and like you said it is stamped S-P-F. Back when I was building I don't know where the lumber came from.

I have heard of the huge lightening fast planners ya'll have up your way, 10,000 feet a minute is unthinkable. I would love to see that wood coming off the other end. They said the skid plates were water cooled to keep the wood from catching on fire.

Keith, we have many different kinds of pine down here. It is strange how the pines will differ in one end of the state from the other end. For example here in Tennessee, some of the pine in West Tennessee are long leaf, short leaf, loblolly, sugar pine, yellow pine and a couple of others, here in East Tennessee the pines are nowhere as big or tall and I don't know what they are, they kinda look like short leaf pine but the cones are smaller and the trees are not tall.

West Tennessee is more flat delta land where East Tennessee is mountainous, that probably has something to do with it.

I did know that about kiln dried lumber but I didn't know much about air dried since I have never used much air dried wood. That is one thing I have never understood, kiln dried wood is brought down to around 6 or 8% (FAS not framing) and air dried is not close to that. Most homes and hospitals have around 50% humidity here. I don't see how air dried could shrink any more in a home or hospital but folks won't use air dried because they are afraid it will.

I have used the cut nails if they look like concrete nails. I am not a big fan of them though. The old homes built in the 1800s and before used the cut nails but they were iron instead of steel. The old iron nails didn't have much holding power at all so they had to build a house where the framing members held the house together instead of the nails. Even the lath nails were cut nails and the old homes had what felt like millions in them.

One thing most folks don't realize about the old 1800 and prior homes is they were built mostly by slaves, While I was privileged to work in the old homes, it saddened me to know master craftsmen who were slaves had worked on these homes. I am talking about the bigger old homes not the smaller old homes. Sorry to get side tracked there.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 11:53 AM   #2242
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 4,403
Rewards Points: 2,342
Default

Gulf Island Building.


On the way home one time, we went through Madison County in Iowa and saw several of the old covered bridges. I don't remember ever knowing what they were made from though.

Here's a picture of one of the trees in the Redwood Forest. There were larger trees than this.

Gulf Island Building.-redwood-forest-2-re-sized.jpg

There was one tree that was still standing and looked healthy, but the center was burned out of it. The burned out area was big enough for at least 10 people to stand in.

Barb
gma2rjc is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gma2rjc For This Useful Post:
BigJim (08-16-2010)
Old 08-16-2010, 12:05 PM   #2243
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,852
Rewards Points: 2,800
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Oh my stars, I can't imagine red wood being wasted on a bridge. It don't seem like it would be strong enough for a bridge. 50 feet in cir is unreal, that is oooooone huge tree!

Talking about reclaiming wood there is a lot of reclaimed heart pine use here. This is the old pine where the growth rings are really close together, not like todays pine. The winters are just not winters anymore down here for the lumber to be of higher grade as back years ago. I have had the privilege to work with really old chestnut and that was really a treat. I wish I had a shed full of that stuff right now, I would probably ruin it from drooling on it.

It would seem like ya'll would get a lot of rain where you are located. That would be kinda scary having to depend on rain water for drinking. I see why you built such large water storages now.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 12:13 PM   #2244
Ole Wood Worker

 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lookout Valley, Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 7,852
Rewards Points: 2,800
Blog Entries: 1
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gma2rjc View Post
On the way home one time, we went through Madison County in Iowa and saw several of the old covered bridges. I don't remember ever knowing what they were made from though.

Here's a picture of one of the trees in the Redwood Forest. There were larger trees than this.

Attachment 23931

There was one tree that was still standing and looked healthy, but the center was burned out of it. The burned out area was big enough for at least 10 people to stand in.

Barb
Whoooo mama, that is one big tree. If I could see one in person I believe I would just hug that pretty thing, oh my stars, I'm a tree hugger. Judy said she was startin to worry about me.
__________________
New members: Please consider adding your location to your profile.

If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

Jim
BigJim is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 12:47 PM   #2245
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 4,403
Rewards Points: 2,342
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
I wish I had a shed full of that stuff right now, I would probably ruin it from drooling on it.
Quote:
If I could see one in person I believe I would just hug that pretty thing, oh my stars, I'm a tree hugger. Judy said she was startin to worry about me.
...... - that's funny.

Seeing those trees up close leaves one speechless. Their size and beauty is overwhelming... in a good way.

Last edited by gma2rjc; 08-16-2010 at 11:48 PM.
gma2rjc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 01:38 PM   #2246
Custom User Title
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 353
Rewards Points: 252
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Wow, amazing thread! Thank you so much for sharing your craft with us. Keep updates coming, I'll be back everyday to check it out.

Btw, you mentioned that their aren't any "paved" roads. Do you have dirt roads or anything? Or are they just walking trails from house to house? I think one of the first things I would have done is brought a 4-wheeler or a bobcat of some sort.
no1hustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 10:05 PM   #2247
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by no1hustler View Post
Wow, amazing thread! Thank you so much for sharing your craft with us. Keep updates coming, I'll be back everyday to check it out.

Btw, you mentioned that their aren't any "paved" roads. Do you have dirt roads or anything? Or are they just walking trails from house to house? I think one of the first things I would have done is brought a 4-wheeler or a bobcat of some sort.
Hi there hustler...no, there are no paved roads here.

There is one main trail which goes right round the island in between the waterfront properties and the "inside" lots as we call them. Most of the w/f lots are about an acre, and the inside lots about 2 acres.

Currently an inside lot is worth about $80,000 and the waterfront lots around $250,000. There are some small trails between some of the cabins here, but basically everyone can access the main trail and visit anywhere they like.

The use of 4 wheelers (unless you mean a 4 wheel ATV) is strictly discouraged here. This is a walking island. There are a number of ATV's here, almost all of which are owned by inside lot owners, or property owners up on the high side at the south west end of the island. They do not have direct water access, so they need some form of transportation to get their goods up the hill from one of the bays here.

Most heavy construction material comes in to Otter Bay on the east side, as there is a wide clearing there and an ATV can bring a trailer to load up.

Smaller loads might be brought in to either Nayler Bay (shown as West Bay on the charts) or Whaleboat Passage which is at the extreme south end of the island.

The reason that West Bay is locally referred to as Nayler Bay is because the island was owned by the Nayler family before it was sold to Nanaimo realty, who in turn developed it into lots. The Naylers had their home at the head of West Bay.

That home is still here and being used by the current owners on a regular basis. (It is presently getting a new roof.)

Thanks for visiting.
cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 10:09 PM   #2248
Custom User Title
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 353
Rewards Points: 252
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Yes, I was referring to ATVs. Thank you for the detailed explanation!
no1hustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 10:13 PM   #2249
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
Oh my stars, I can't imagine red wood being wasted on a bridge. It don't seem like it would be strong enough for a bridge. 50 feet in cir is unreal, that is oooooone huge tree!

Talking about reclaiming wood there is a lot of reclaimed heart pine use here. This is the old pine where the growth rings are really close together, not like todays pine. The winters are just not winters anymore down here for the lumber to be of higher grade as back years ago. I have had the privilege to work with really old chestnut and that was really a treat. I wish I had a shed full of that stuff right now, I would probably ruin it from drooling on it.

It would seem like ya'll would get a lot of rain where you are located. That would be kinda scary having to depend on rain water for drinking. I see why you built such large water storages now.
Jim: I think back in the day that they didn't think it was a waste of wood to build bridges. After all, it was an available resource and was cheap at the time. Some of those huge bridge timbers would just about make you cry today. Unimaginable lengths of clear timber like you could not believe.

I'd be willing to bet that the pic of that redwood that Barb posted is bigger than 50' around.

In order to get out of the rain shadow, you would only need to get down towards Victoria - at the south end of Vancouver Island, or over to the west coast, say Tofino for example, which gets 127" of rain a year. We get about 3 feet here.
cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 10:15 PM   #2250
Member
 
cocobolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North Shuswap, B.C., Canada
Posts: 6,771
Rewards Points: 2,280
Default

Gulf Island Building.


Quote:
Originally Posted by no1hustler View Post
Yes, I was referring to ATVs. Thank you for the detailed explanation!
Whew!!!! Thank goodness for that!!!

Advertisement

cocobolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
glue down hardwood flooring along gulf coast sbmcclean@sbcglobal.net Flooring 6 12-21-2008 02:55 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts