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Old 06-27-2010, 10:56 PM   #1486
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Gulf Island Building.


When you start to laminate something from several layers of wood - and you're doing it in a curve - it will not hold shape until you get the fourth layer of wood in place. Three layers might hold somewhat, but the fourth is when it starts to become useful.
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:00 PM   #1487
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Here is the transition between the lower and upper sections of the rail.

In order to get the curve to remain smooth, as opposed to looking like a distinct bump, you need to use force and two boards as cauls.

This is only the first two layers at the transition, the next I will do later tonight which will give the first three layers an excellent chance to set up overnight.
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:02 PM   #1488
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Gulf Island Building.


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In between gluing up the handrail pieces, I put the two end posts out on the deck. Now I can commence with the soffit on the underside.
Without my glasses I can see that those supports are bent. Starting to look like a Dr. Seuss house. It kind of funny how we both are are on big projects at the same time. I sure wish I could see it in person when I fly back in Aug. dorf dude...
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:03 PM   #1489
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Gulf Island Building.


With the upper part of the railing starting to go in, the length of this handrail has now reached 21' 9".

I'm expecting to have to install between 8 and 10 layers of wood to get the thickness I would like to have.
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Old 06-28-2010, 12:04 AM   #1490
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Without my glasses I can see that those supports are bent. Starting to look like a Dr. Seuss house. It kind of funny how we both are are on big projects at the same time. I sure wish I could see it in person when I fly back in Aug. dorf dude...
Bent!!!! Of course, I should have thought of that!!

So now it's officially the bent house is it?
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Old 06-28-2010, 10:20 AM   #1491
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Gulf Island Building.


Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen, boys and girls, cats and dogs...and anyone else who may be checking in here from time to time.

This is a giant "Thank You" from me to all of you who have either participated in this thread...or maybe have just been lurking in the background.

Either way, I thank you most sincerely.

It seems as though we have arrived at two somewhat distinct milestones at the same time!

I well remember the day when shumakerscott reached his milestone 50,000th view on his incredible thread. He took a few minutes to show his appreciation by making a very special post of appreciation to all of you.

In my somewhat ham-fisted and wordy way, I am trying to do the same.

Thanks to your encouragement, we have arrived at the 100th page simultaneously with our 50,000th view, a fortuitous coincidence indeed!

Many of you are regular visitors here, and it is your daily comments which keep me inspired to carry on as best I can. Believe me when I say none of this would be possible without your continued help, and I can only hope that you will find something to make you chuckle - or maybe even be helpful - as we go ahead toward the next 100 pages...GASP!!!

I do, however, have a small request for those of you who might be looking in from time to time but who have never said "Hi".

By now, you might have a pretty good idea about me...but I don't even know who you are. Please don't be bashful...take a minute out of your busy day to drop in and introduce yourself. Let me know what you're doing - I enjoy visiting other threads - and if you don't yet have a thread running, by all means ask if there is anything I may be able to help you with.

So once again, please let me thank you for allowing me to reach our double milestone...and I hope that you will be able to stick around for a little while longer as I attempt to get this crazy job all done!

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 06-28-2010, 10:59 AM   #1492
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Gulf Island Building.


Greetings from the other end of Canada!

I have been sifting through your thread for a few weeks now and am in utter awe of the work you've put into that place. I have been working on a basement remodel for a few weeks now, doing all of the work by myself (well, my wife helped with some painting) and whenever I get the feeling that the project is getting the best of me, I just think about how long you've been going at it and it helps keep me motivated.

I am starting to see the end of the tunnel (mostly paint and trim now) and hope to get some pics up soon.

I look forward to seeing more of your amazing job.
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Old 06-28-2010, 11:48 AM   #1493
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Greetings from the other end of Canada!

I have been sifting through your thread for a few weeks now and am in utter awe of the work you've put into that place. I have been working on a basement remodel for a few weeks now, doing all of the work by myself (well, my wife helped with some painting) and whenever I get the feeling that the project is getting the best of me, I just think about how long you've been going at it and it helps keep me motivated.

I am starting to see the end of the tunnel (mostly paint and trim now) and hope to get some pics up soon.

I look forward to seeing more of your amazing job.
Greetings to you in Nova Scotia!!

Many, many thanks for posting.

Please let me know when you have your pics up...I will definitely be taking a look! But why not start now and show the process you have had to go through?

I like to think that I can begin to see that mythical light as well...I just hope I'm not deluding myself yet again!

And again...many thanks for dropping by to say hello...I really do appreciate it.
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:26 PM   #1494
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You know how I always like to learn something new every day...well, today is no exception.

The stair rail is starting to get a bit wider now, and it is holding its' shape without any problem.

I am using either two or three lengths of wood for every row, depending on how long the first piece is.

If you are not very careful in the attachment of either the second or third piece of wood, you may find that the wood opens up and leaves a gap. This is obviously not what you need, so a particular process needs to be followed. I didn't really pay much attention to this before because I didn't run into the problem until this morning.

If you try to put a temporary clamp in the middle of the piece you are attaching, you will find that chances are you will open up a gap where the two pieces of wood join. Yes, it could be filled with wood filler, but...not on my hand rail thank you.

So, the trick is to use many spring clamps right up close to the join, and then start using the big clamps with cauls immediately after that.
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:31 PM   #1495
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Once you have the spring clamps in place with the joint tight, which you can see in the pic above, the wood will stay in place. Then as soon as you have the first c-clamp on, it won't move anywhere.

I added another shot of the spring clamps, so you can see how many I use to make sure the new wood doesn't move.
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:33 PM   #1496
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Gulf Island Building.


Once you are that far, then remove the spring clamps and replace them with more c-clamps, again using cauls to spread the load better.

This allows you to get more pressure on the wood.

It might be a bit embarrassing if half your railing fell off due to a lack of clamping pressure!
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:36 PM   #1497
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Gulf Island Building.


Do you ever have trouble with two pieces of wood (with fresh glue between them) wanting to slide out of place as you are tightening the clamps?
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:56 PM   #1498
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Do you ever have trouble with two pieces of wood (with fresh glue between them) wanting to slide out of place as you are tightening the clamps?
Yes, we all go through that one.

There are little tricks to help with that, depending on what you are clamping up.

F'rinstance, if you are doing a simple clamping of flat wood - heaven forbid I should be so lucky to be able to that here - you can try two things.

From the "not good" side, you can drive a thin nail in each end - temporarily - while you are clamping. That usually keeps the wood from moving.

The other method - which requires a little patience - involves using spring clamps in several places, while the glue takes its' initial set.

Once the glue gets a good hold, which only takes a couple of minutes, you can go ahead and use the c-clamps, or bar clamps or...

Most of the glues on the market today, the stuff like Elmer's or Titebond have a high initial "tack". And it is made this way just for the purpose you are asking about.

Usually, the reason that the wood starts to move when you are drawing the clamps up tight is because they are not completely straight against the wood. So, for example, if you have a clamp which is set at 85 to the wood, rather than 90, the wood will want to slide over toward the 90 mark in order to bring the clamp in line.

Am I making any sense here?

Another way to help avoid this sticky little problem is to use several clamps, but just draw all of them up until they start to get snug...not really tight.

Then, starting from the middle and working outward, bring the clamps up more snugly. Do that in two or three steps. That has a tendency to help prevent the wood from moving.

Clear as mud right?
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:14 PM   #1499
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Thanks, that does make sense. It happened to me when I was building a gate and it was very frustrating.

There are over 1500 posts in this thread!

Barb
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:07 PM   #1500
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Barb, I just thought of other ways to prevent the glue sliding thingie.

If possible, you might use a biscuit or two between each piece of wood.

Or perhaps you could use a countersunk screw, which you would later plug.

In either case, you wouldn't really see any evidence once you were finished. I'm sure there are other ways. Like adding clamps both across the width and length of the wood being glued. That would prevent any sliding.

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