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Old 01-22-2009, 11:26 PM   #136
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Gulf Island Building.


All trimmed off and ready to wear a new top.
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Old 01-24-2009, 12:58 AM   #137
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Today I disassembled the curved counter for a couple of reasons. First I had to get the inside painted, and got two undercoats on today. The top has two components, first a layer of OSB, and then 3/4" MDF on top of that. It was real fun trying to get the top to fit right, so everything to this point has been a trial fit only. I cut all the biscuit holes in the MDF, so that when it goes back together, it will act as though the whole top is a single piece.
On top of that I am using a tile backer, then the granite tiles. So all together, the top will be about 2" thick.
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:02 AM   #138
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This shot doesn't have a whole lot to do with DIY, but this afternoon, wife number 2 came charging into the house hollering "Come and take a look at this!" Of course, I am right in the midst of doing something so I am not happy about being ordered outside, especially when the temperature is only 2C.
And what do my beady little eyes behold, but a couple of people sailing close by in a lovely schooner. In January. It's cold. They must be certifiably insane.
Nice boat though.
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Old 01-25-2009, 08:53 PM   #139
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Gulf Island Building.


Hey cocobolo,

I just had a chance to read through your thread. All I can say is yours is the ultimate DIY project. Right from gathering logs from the ocean.

I'm going to stay tuned.

Cheers.
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Old 01-25-2009, 10:02 PM   #140
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Gulf Island Building.


Wow! Pretty heady comment there, thank you very much.
We have a couple of families here from Edmonton, well, St. Albert actually.
After much messing about and trying to get 4 x 8 sheets of OSB on the ceiling, I finally gave up and decided to cut the sheets smaller. First tried a half sheet at 4 x 4 feet. I didn't really like the way it looked. So I cut that down to 2 x 4 feet.
I have a few pieces pre-painted which are now ready to go up. Here is a pic of the first few. I was going to put up some more, but just a few minutes ago I got the second topcoat of paint on inside the cabinet which is right below this bit of the ceiling, and I didn't want to stir up the not inconsequential amount of dust on the floor. So I will play on the computer while it dries up a bit more.
They are being put up in a brick style pattern.
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Old 01-25-2009, 10:07 PM   #141
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As of yesterday afternoon, we were still trying to figure out how to get full sheets up. Unfortunately wife number 2 cannot lift anything over her shoulders. Except for food, of course. So I made a really tall saw horse, I suppose you shouldn't call it a saw horse at that height, should you?
The plan was to sit one end of the sheet on top, then jam a deadman under the other end to get the sheet tight to the ceiling. Then go back to the first end and start nailing it off.
Here's the whatever-you-want-to-call-it.
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:39 PM   #142
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Today, after spending half the morning painting more OSB, I decided to try and get most of the cedar boards on the front of the long curved cabinet.
While picking them up and taking at least a cursory look at them, I found that quite a few had a very rough surface. Not good enough to nail on, so I sanded them down and gave them another coat of varnish.
These are the offending pieces.
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:40 PM   #143
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Here's the first batch nailed and glued in place.
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:43 PM   #144
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Here we are mid way through.
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:45 PM   #145
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And at this point I ran out of finished boards. There are about 50 to go. So, another few days while the varnish is applied and dries.
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Old 01-27-2009, 06:08 AM   #146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobolo View Post
Today, after spending half the morning painting more OSB, I decided to try and get most of the cedar boards on the front of the long curved cabinet.
While picking them up and taking at least a cursory look at them, I found that quite a few had a very rough surface. Not good enough to nail on, so I sanded them down and gave them another coat of varnish.
These are the offending pieces.
Sounds like you might need to have a talk with that helper of yours!
Just kidding, of course. Looking great! I enjoy getting up in the morning and browsing your post while I drink my 'go juice' (coffee). Though I know it is in another post, let us know how those LEDs work out for you.
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Old 01-27-2009, 02:55 PM   #147
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Hi wrangler: Last night I spent at least a couple of hours on the web getting more LED info, and the more I find out, the more I realize I don't know! It isn't quite as easy as buying some and sticking them in the ceiling.
It seems that there have been several problems with the LED's, much as there were with the early CF's when they first came out. I will put more on the LED thread in a bit.
Been doing a bit on the bathroom downstairs today. Got the ceiling joists hung in place and a couple of lights wired up.
I'm going to see if I can find a tile expert on the site who can give me some guidance as to how to stick the tiles on to the back wall of the shower.
I'm still suffering from "Curved Wall Syndrome" and now it is coming back to haunt me....again.
It has been so long since I framed the back wall that I forget the radius I used.
I think it was 22'. I will get a photo to explain the problem. I may have a solution, but I would still like advice from someone who really knows these things.
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Old 01-27-2009, 04:00 PM   #148
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I have just posted a question in the general discussion group about how to stick tiles onto a curved wall. You can see pics of the problem there if you wish.
In addition to the back shower wall, I am putting in a small sink between the entrance door to the bathroom and one of the shower walls.
I had some pieces of 3/4 MDF kicking about which were left over from the kitchen counter. Much of it matches the curve on the counter, and I thought why not try to fit a bit of that in the bathroom.
So I put some cleats on the walls to hold the countertop, and cut a couple of pieces of MDF to fit. Right now it is just sitting there, and I have already cut the biscuit holes for it to be glued up. I will add a piece of 3/4" plywood to the top. That will give me 1 1/2" thickness. I would like to tile the counter with granite and that would include the front edge. I think 1 1/2" is a bit thin for that, so maybe I will add another couple of layers of plywood underneath the front edge to build it up to 3". That should look a bit better.
Here's the funny shape.
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Old 01-27-2009, 04:26 PM   #149
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Not that it shows up very well in the pic above, but after I decided to put the sink there rather than on the other side of the bathroom, it was necessary to move the door over. You can see where the original stud is where the jamb would have been nailed. That was a very tiny space. Moving the door frame over increased the space at that end of the counter to just over 10". That in combination with the curved counter provides sufficient room for the sink. I haven't taken the sink out of the box yet, but it is one of those that sits right up on top.
When I get the extra plywood cut out and attached, I will sit it on top and get a photo.
Having to move a door really isn't that big of a deal. All I had to do in this case was to sledgehammer out one stud and add another one on the opposite side. There is room for a pre-hung 30" door.
And herein lies one of the advantages of designing and building your own house. You can make changes on the fly.
However, a HUGE word of caution about that.
You can expect that when building almost any house, that there will be changes. It is almost inevitable.
One thing to avoid at all costs is making a major structural change while you are underway. I just have to give you this example.
There is a fairly large house going up on the island here, and they are up to putting on the roof right now.
The shape of the house is basically a rectangle. So far no problem. Then they decided that each of the two corners overlooking the ocean would have cutouts about 8' by 11'. Still OK. But here's the rub, they did not want any post at the intersecting outside corners to hold up the rafters for the hip roof!!
They have added an additional beam around the entire perimeter of the house to which they want to attach a bug screen. The enclosed area now will be something like 36' by 60'+. Pretty big, especially for this little island.
They had it in mind to use this extra beam, located about 6' outside the house walls, to sit the two front hip rafters on. If you could see how this was to be done, you too would have realized it was nearly impossible, for a variety of reasons. It would have been technically possible, but would have entailed a very serious additional expense.
Fortunately, after much discussion, the wife - who was the one who didn't want a post there - reluctantly agreed to do it the right way. That is, with the post in the corner, and the two beams in place to complete the rectangle upon which to sit the hip roof. As it should have been all along.
If you are going to tackle something like this, I highly recommend making yourself a scale model from cardboard first.
It's a whole lot easier to fix a cardboard model than a 60' long house!!!
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Old 01-27-2009, 09:52 PM   #150
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OK, got some more done on the bathroom sink. I added a 3/4" plywood top plus two more layers of MDF (dusty stuff isn't it?) to bring the top to 3" thick.
The last two pieces of MDF are only a couple of inches wide, which is purely to build up the front thickness for tiling.
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