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Old 05-02-2013, 01:01 PM   #16
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diycoder's shed project


Quote:
Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
I'm referring to the picture in post #2 where it looks like you used a piece of 1/4 plywood as a shim. Water will stand on that spot.

The plywood doesn't look treated to me but even if it is you still don't want water to stand on it. Treated plywood (unlike marine ply) only uses water a resistant glue that will break down and the chemicals used for the treatment will leach out and fail over time in wet conditions.

I know this is just a shed but plywood (treated or not) wouldn't be my choice for a shim in that spot.
Oh, I see. That picture was from when I did a rough layout to see how the rim joist & sill plates will layout on the foundation. That's when I discovered my first error because I read the wrong number off the plans instead of calculating the correct number.

I moved the front blocks in by 4 inches so all of the blocks/shims are under the shed by at least 1 inch, none exposed to the weather.

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Old 05-02-2013, 08:56 PM   #17
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A couple of nights ago, I installed the floor joists. Some of the joists were slightly twisted
so I would fasten one end securely and then use a bar clamp to untwist the other send before
securing it to the rim joist like this picture shows:



Another issue that I encountered is that the rim joists were slightly bowed in the middle such that
there was a significant gap. If the gap was small enough, the screws will pull the joist and rim board
together. If the gap is too big, the screw will have to be driven deeply into the wood which is not
a good thing to do. In this picture, look at the middle screw:



Instead, I would use some washers to help prevent the screw from sinking into the wood like this
picture shows:



Once the gap is closed up, I put another screw in or two before undoing the screw with the washers.

Another approach is to use a lag bolt and washers if you need greater force. Here's a picture of
an open joist gap:



With the lag bolt, the gap is closed enough for you to put your screws in.



One could just use lag bolts/washers to secure all of the joists but they're expensive. I think the 3 washers
and bolt cost me around $1.40 when buying them individually at the local hardware store.

After installing all of the joists, I'm now ready for the earth anchors.



I did try to install one of the arrowhead anchors with a sledge hammer but it was tough going trying to hold the
driver bar with one hand and using the other hand with the sledge hammer. I'm going to the rental place to see
if I can get some sort of jack hammer to make the installation easier like this one:



Oh, before I forget, a few tips:

1. Before installing the joists, check for the crown of the joist. That is, where the joist has a hump in the middle. It should be installed so that the hump is on top. You can sight down the board to see where the crown is. I find it easier to put the board (edge side) on another board (flat side) and seeing if it rocks. If it rocks, then that side has the crown and you should mark it as such. If it doesn't rock, flip the board over and check the other side.

Whatever you do, you don't want some joists to be installed crown up and some crown down. It will make for a wavy floor.

2. I used 2x6 for the floor joists and most of them were about 5 1/2" to 5 5/8" wide. There were a few boards that were 5 3/4" which made them stick too far proud of the rim joists. So I had to rip them down to 5 1/2" on the table saw.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:49 PM   #18
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I stopped by the rental store to see if I could rent a jack hammer to make it easier to drive
in the ground anchors. They didn't really have anything that would work with the 3/4" rod
that came with the anchors.

So I went back to the sledge hammer route and with more determination this time, I was able to
drive in all 6 anchors.

I had bought the ground anchor kit from the site www.americanea.com. It
consisted of a 3 ft long drive rod, 6 4" arrowheads with 60" cable & 18 cable clamps (3 per
arrowhead). You put an arrowhead on the end of the drive rod and push it against the ground.
Then use the sledgehammer to drive it about 2 to 2.5 into the ground. Then you remove the
drive rod and in my case, I put a made a loop at the end of the cable and put one of the
clamps on. I put the drive rod through the loop so that I could grab the rod and pull up
on the cable. This will set the arrow head into a horizontal position. It's amazing that
you can feel the arrow head move a couple of inches and then it locks into the ground.

A 4" arrow head that is buried 2.5 ft in hard soil will require 2000+ lbs of force to move
it.

This picture shows the installation method:


Here's a picture of the arrow head anchor:


Here's a picture of one of my arrow head anchors being installed:


After pulling up to set the anchor, I drilled a small hole in the middle of the joist and pushed the arrow head cable through the hole and looped it back to the cable. I secured it with 3 cable clamps after taking all of the slack out.

Here's a photo of the installed cable with clamps:


The next day, I installed the 3/4" ACX plywood on the joists which was secured with 2" galvanized ring shanked nails, every 6" along the joist.

Here's the completed platform:


I spent the rest of the weekend building two of the walls.





The walls are temporarily up and not in their final position. I got them up by myself and need to get some
assistance from my wife and/or friends to put them in the final spot and to get them plumb.

Using the framing nailer really made the wall construction a lot easier. I made a modification to the
shed plans I'm following to change the wall height from 82" to 90".<

Last edited by diycoder; 05-06-2013 at 08:31 AM. Reason: Use large thumbnails to make pictures smaller.
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:37 PM   #19
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This is really cool to see. I built my own shed a few months ago using a plan I designed in SketchUp and its fun to "relive" the experience through watching your project

Keep up the good work!

-Seth
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Old 05-10-2013, 10:13 AM   #20
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It has been 5 days, are you done yet? Moar pictures!

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Old 05-10-2013, 11:04 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by no1hustler View Post
It has been 5 days, are you done yet? Moar pictures!

Ha ha ha. I can pretty much work on it only on weekends and when I take some days off from work. This weekend is going to be tough because of Mother's day, daughter's recital, and daughter's birthday party sleepover. I will try to find some time to cut wood though!
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Old 05-10-2013, 01:55 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diycoder View Post
Ha ha ha. I can pretty much work on it only on weekends and when I take some days off from work. This weekend is going to be tough because of Mother's day, daughter's recital, and daughter's birthday party sleepover. I will try to find some time to cut wood though!
Okay...so you'll be down late Sunday night instead of Sunday afternoon. I can wait till Monday for updated pictures.

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Old 05-12-2013, 07:51 PM   #23
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Sorry but no pictures again. Didn't get much done this weekend because of the rain. Was able to work this afternoon to build the third wall and almost finished the fourth wall. Also ripped the plywood for the roof into 34 3/8 width with the 13" width pieces to be used for the roof trusses.

Hopefully next weekend, I'll be able to make all of the roof trusses and then I will install the walls, roof trusses and start sheathing the roof.
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Old 05-13-2013, 09:17 PM   #24
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Currently, I have the walls built but they're laying flat on the platform
so that I'm able to cover them with a tarp. Once I finish the roof trusses,
I will erect the walls permanently, put up the trusses, and then start
installing the roof decking. Hopefully that will happen this coming weekend.
Here's a shot of the walls and the roof decking that has been ripped to width.



The plywood for the roof decking is 34" wide so that the roof will have 3
courses. I guess that is a bit stronger to have 3 interleaving courses than
to have 2 non-interleaving, wider courses.

Ripping the plywood leaves a 14" strip that I use for the truss gussets. These
plywood pieces will be used to hold it together.

First I rip the strips down to 11 1/2" width. Then I cut them up into 11 1/2"
squares. To make it easier, I stack 3 strips of plywood on my saw and cut
them into squares like this picture shows:



Now I have a stack of 36 squares.



The next step is to cut a 50deg angle on the block. To make it easier, I rigged
a stop block on the chop saw at the right position. Then I stack 3 squares
on top of each other and cut the angle.



Here they are, all done:



Next I had to create the gusset for the top portion of the truss.



The nice thing about these gussets is that you don't have to be super precise
cutting them. This is not fine, finish carpentry.

The next thing I did was to cut the 50deg angles on all of the 2x6 uses for
the bottom chords. One thing I noticed about the 2x6 is that they were all
very straight unlike the 2x4 which tend to be bowed & twisted.



The plans call for a 50deg angle to be cut on both ends of the 12' 2x6, 1.5
inches up from the bottom. To make it easier, I use a square that is set
for 1.5" and draw a line on the 2x6. Then I eyeball the saw blade and make
sure that it cuts the angle at the right spot.



Here's the stack of 9 bottom chords all ready to go:



The next step will be to cut all of the 2x4 top chords of the trusses which I'll
do later this week.
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Old 05-13-2013, 09:30 PM   #25
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The reason I'm building a new shed is that I'm not satisfied with the
existing 12x8 shed on the property.



The problem is that the door entrance is too low. I have bumped my head a
few times against the pointy end of the roof rafters. Secondly, it's not
mouse proof. If I leave my lawn mower in the shed over the winter, the
mice will make a nest inside the engine cover. The third issue is that there
are no windows and the door tends to self-close thereby leaving you in the
dark.

Here's a shot of the front door:



As you can see, the front shed directly touches the ground which is not good.

Here's a picture of the back left corner of the shed:



Nice big pile of cinder blocks holding it up. There's support only under
the four corners so the floor feels a little spongy.

After I finish the new shed, I will still keep the old one because you can
never have too much storage space but I will only store stuff like garden
tools & hoses.
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Old 05-20-2013, 08:34 PM   #26
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Another update on the shed. The weather forecast was showing perfect weather for the weekend so
I took advantage of it by taking Friday off from work to have a good chunk of time to make major
progress.

I had already cut up the wood for the bottom chord of my roof trusses so the next step was to
cut up the top chords, all 18 of them.

Again, I would gang cut, two at a time. I found it easier to keep them in alignment by using
a 3 1/2" screw to temporarily join them.



After an hour of cutting, I had a stack of top chords:



The next step was to use the floor of the shed as a platform to make a roof truss jig. This
involved laying the pieces out on the floor as it is to be built and then screwing them to
the floor. I added a few pieces of plywood to the edges to help keep the wood in alignment.



So to assemble a truss, it was a simple matter of putting the wood pieces in place.



I would put the top gusset on the peak of the truss and quickly trace it out so that I could
see where to put the liquid nail glue.



Then it was a matter of putting the top gusset in place and nailing it off.



Same thing for the bottom chord except that the gusset was bigger and I had to use more glue.



Then I would install the gusset and nail it off.



The truss was flipped over and I did the same thing to the other side.



It took awhile to assemble the 9 trusses. There was a lot of nailing to be done. There
was a total of 7 regular trusses and 2 gable end trusses. The gable end trusses were
different in that they had a middle chord and the gussets were on only one side.

Here is a shot of the completed trusses.

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Old 05-20-2013, 08:49 PM   #27
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Nice work. I've been following this thread since my last post.
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:05 PM   #28
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I forgot to mention that prior to assembling the trusses, I also raised and squared up the walls. I put up some blocks
around the perimeter to make it easy to raise the walls and not have them slip off the platform.

Here's a shot of the raised walls and the one truss I put up by myself temporarily.



I needed my wife's help to install the trusses and since she wasn't around, I went ahead and installed the wall sheathing.



One mistake I made was installing the first OSB panel with the lines on the inside. I quickly learned that the lines were handy
to help you identify the location of the studs. So if you saw that the stud was about 1" away from the line,
you could put the nail gun halfway down the board, one inch from the line and be confident that you'll hit the stud.

I nailed up the sheating using a 6" nailing pattern. That is, installing nails every 6", 24" on center. It wasn't easy but I
managed to get the first course of plywood up by myself without any help. I would hold the plywood against the wall until the middle
met the layout line and then I put a nail in. Then I would level the plywood and nail it off.

The upper pieces were easier to install since I had the lower OSB boards to use as support.

My wife came back from errands and was able to help me get two of the trusses up.



I got 3/4 worth of the siding installed and two trusses before calling it quits for the day.



On the two gable trusses, I had to attach a 2x4 to the bottom chord so that the gable would stick out a couple of
inchese from the bottom wall. I used a bunch of nails to really secure it but I made a mistake. Can anyone spot
the mistake?



I put the 2x4 on the wrong side of the truss. They were supposed to go on the side with the gussets. Since I did
it on the wrong side, the gussets would be facing out. The problem with this is that if you install the wall sheathing
it would be sticking out by 1/2" for most of the truss.

I tried to take the 2x4 apart using the pry bar but boy, I really did nail it good. I decided to leave it as-is and would
pad out the truss with plywood pieces in order to have a consistent nailing surface.



I also had to add 1/2" to the roof sheathing measurements to compensate for the added thickness.

So we then started installing the rest of the trusses. Before, we were doing one at a time but then I thought it was easier to
put up all of the trusses on the top plate before installing them one by one.



For installing them, we would align the truss every 4 inches and then used two 4" screws at each end to secure it.

Now all of the trusses have been installed. Wow, it's starting to look like a real shed now.



I started laying the plywood on the roof.



Once I got the first course down, I found it helpful to nail a 2x4 along the bottom in order to stand on the roof.
Otherwise, the roof was too steep and the plywood too slippery to stay in place.

The rest of the day was spent quickly installing the rest of the roof sheathing since it started to lightly rain
and I wanted to be able to get the tarp over the roof. Finally I was able to finish and cover it with a tarp.



Earlier in the day, I had to run to Lowes to pick up some more plywood since I under estimated by 4-5 sheets. I also
picked up some PVC trim and some more 2x10 for the rake overhang. I also got some black strap hinges, gate handles, and
a latch mechanism, and some roof brackets. I spent around $600 so I'm currently up to around $4200 for the project. Ouch!

Next weekend, I plan to finish the rest of the exterior sheathing, install the tar paper on the walls, and construct/install
the rake overhang. I will also work on the door entrance.
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:22 PM   #29
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That's looking really good
Do you have any diagonal bracing in the trusses?
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Old 05-20-2013, 09:36 PM   #30
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What has been the biggest cost? Just the lumber?

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