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Old 10-10-2011, 10:24 AM   #121
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Last night was certainly entertaining. I decided that I was going to at least begin demo on the raised portion of the living room so that I could get a feeling for what was underneath.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-170.jpg

I carefully removed three of the already-cracked tiles with a good old trusty B.U.S. (Big Ugly Screwdriver - the one that looks like it had been abused for 50 years). One tile cracked in a wierd way and left sharp ceramic splinters, one of which went right into my thumb. It didn't hurt, and I barely touched it, but I was spurting blood. That compounds the other thumb that got poked with a brand new factory-sharp Chef's knife while opening a brick of cheese.

The wife had told me that she wanted me to save and reuse or sell the old tiles. When she asked why I was dealing with them so gingerly. Apparently she'd changed her mind without telling me. The 4th came off with just a few quick whacks. I gently pried the hardwood off the front, the quart round moulding and the base moulding.

Oddly enough, there was thinset under the hardwood. With some staples and carpet fibers on top of that. So at some point this thing as tiled on the side, then it was carpeted (with zero carpet in this house, wtf?), and then removed and covered with leftover hardwood flooring planks. Go figure.

I revealed what I'd hoped to underneath: a nice, empty space framed out with 2x12s on top of perfectly clean foundation. Yay, no disgusting amount of scraping ahead!

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Old 10-10-2011, 10:31 AM   #122
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Once everybody's moving around and awake, I'll start back up with my baby crowbar, pop the tiles off, then sledge the plywood. Had to stop last night because the wife wanted the both of us to go return the videos and get some groceries. I sneaked in a trip to Lowe's for a dimmable CFL and we ended up leaving with two new brushed nickel doorknobs and six new brushed nickel hinges. For the record, they're the same as the ones I showed on the previous page. There was one with a slightly twisted, fluted handle quite similar, but at $44/ea and with a 5-day Special Order wait, I wasn't going for that.

The wife started in on old knob removal before I could even get everything inside, let alone take pictures. So the before/afters will be a little hobbled together this time, I'm afraid.

Before/After
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-171.jpg1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-173.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-174.jpg1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-175.jpg

A little close-up detail of the old scratches... or as close as my crummy camera would allow.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-172.jpg
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:33 AM   #123
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Apparently, somebody was a real fan of graphite powder, because I've found it in every hinge and knob so far. Because there are cheap hollow-core doors with only stain, no sealant, it's very difficult to remove and ends up darkening the surrounding area slightly. Grrr.

Front
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-176.jpg

Back
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-177.jpg
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:36 AM   #124
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Again, more graphite everywhere. Cleared a few cobwebs while I was at it.

Before/After
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-178.jpg1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-180.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-179.jpg1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-181.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-182.jpg1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-183.jpg

The wife got the hinges off, again, before I could take pictures. Sorry about that.

The trim on both doors hasn't been painted yet, because these are the last two rooms to be painted. I'm waiting on a style decision about the wainscoting in the office before I do paint.
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:29 PM   #125
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Looks nice. I've been thinking about replacing all my interior doors, but from what I read, pre-hung or slab doors both seem to be difficult.
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Old 10-10-2011, 04:13 PM   #126
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Yeah, I wish I had the $$ for a new set of doors. Or baseboards. Or trim. Or crown. Or... or...

Just finished demo on the raised portion, and was just emailing myself the photos to scrub the EXIF data.

I gotta get to sleep for work tonight, but I'll try to post the details before midnight Pacific.
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:00 PM   #127
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thadius856 View Post
Yeah, I wish I had the $$ for a new set of doors. Or baseboards. Or trim. Or crown. Or... or...

Just finished demo on the raised portion, and was just emailing myself the photos to scrub the EXIF data.

I gotta get to sleep for work tonight, but I'll try to post the details before midnight Pacific.
I changed a few knobs recently also. Exact same style you chose. I need to change the hinges still... Another project and more money I don't yet have... Mind sharing how much a brushed nickel hinge goes for?
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:28 PM   #128
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


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Originally Posted by natedro View Post
I changed a few knobs recently also. Exact same style you chose. I need to change the hinges still... Another project and more money I don't yet have... Mind sharing how much a brushed nickel hinge goes for?
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-190.jpg

The 3-pack was about $8. Lowe's website shows them at $8.48. They come in 5/8" round (pictured), 1/4" round (can take a picture), and rectangular. The hall closet has 1/4" round and I prefer the look, but I wasn't at my usual Lowe's, didn't see the 1/4" round, and frankly was happy enough with an excuse to not have to re-chisel the hinge mortises to make room.

Remember, you typically need 2 for interior doors and 3 for exterior doors.

I bought two 3-packs, so the last two will go on the carpenter's door, but I just didn't get to that today.

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Old 10-10-2011, 10:34 PM   #129
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Woke up this morning to heavy rain.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-184.jpg

Funny thing was that I couldn't hear it at all anywhere inside the house. Certainly unexpected. I opened up the back door and, sure enough, it was beating away on the patio overhang.

Still no signs of leaks. Peaked in the attic briefly and didn't see any spots or smell any mustiness of the blown-in insulation getting wet. Certainly no leaks in the tool shed. There's some standing water at the downspout in the picture because I never filled in last year's carved-out hole.

We have a fairly decent view of the city's rustic water tower just outside the front door. I really liked the look of it wet, but didn't get a picture because my little town's name is plastered all over it.
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Old 10-10-2011, 11:04 PM   #130
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Demolition progressed at a steady rate, though it took some time to find the optimal method for tearing it all out.

The first method was to prybar/hammer off each tile. But this was some heavily modified thinset, well laid, and strong porcelain tile, so it was very difficult to remove even in pieces. You couldn't just smack the face of it to crack it either, at least without sending sharp bits flying twenty feet across the room. After the tile was off, I'd smash the plywood to bits between the supports. The downside was that it took forever, but the upside was that the largest bit of trash was smaller than 6" across and fit in the household waste. This worke for the first few small sections. (This is the method from yesterday's pictures)

The carpenter lent a hand and we came up with the second method. It involved removing the supports from the still-tiled portions, then simply stepping on what was left hanging over. The idea was that the tile would stay rigid against the flexing plywood and pop right off. Only that even with strong deflections, they miraculously stayed well-attached. This method was quickly scrapped. (That's what you see us trying here. I've split the one 2x12 that you can't see in half and knocked it out)

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-185.jpg

Method three included delaminating the plywood with tiles still attached. As we drove the prybars between the two center layers, the tile would crack and break off. This would expose the screwheads (yep, screws... this added considerable time since the heads were under the thinset) so we could pry/unscrew the bottom half from the supports. This worked for the second third of the removal.

The last third was simply carried off. Since it just floating there, we simply cut down the 11' section of 2x12s and walked it out the door intact. A dump run will definitely be required.

We were then talking about the rock wall. I hated it, he loved it. It was going to come down, period. And we decided it would be easier to remove now than to try to remove it later without damanging the new tile. I had enough time before bed, so, guess what... it came down too.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-186.jpg

A combination of pick-axe for some rocks and prybar/hammer for others worked well. The dyed mortar between the rocks was fairly soft, and the mortar between the rocks and the wall was broke easily. Underneath was chicken wire, secured with roofing nails to two layers of tar paper marked "gun grade", whatever that means. Beneath that, a layer of sheetrock that we pretty well destroyed. After filling twenty contractor bags with CMUs, mortar, tile, wood, etc. we ran out of space to put more trash, so it stayed up. That, and we didn't want a half-open wall with it getting colder.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-187.jpg

Here, we're still in the cleanup stage. A thick layer of concrete dust has settled over everything and we're trying to vacuum it off seating, swiffer it off electronics and sweep/mop it off the floors.

I'll be buying sheetrock, tape and mud on my next day off, as well as doing that dump run. I suspect I'll probably need to pay my dues to the Pink Panther as well, and I'd like to do some work on the electrical while I have the wall open. I think I already have all the electrical tools/materials I'll need on-hand, except maybe switch boxes. (I only have $5/ea old work boxes w/ clamps and wings, and may as well just get some with the stud bracket.)
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Old 10-10-2011, 11:17 PM   #131
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Here's what needs to go to the dump now. Thank goodness for having a van at our disposal because there's no way the Accord, Firebird or Neon would carry it in less than five trips.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-188.jpg

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Old 10-11-2011, 12:12 PM   #132
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I suppose I missed something, why did you remove that piece of flooring?
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:15 PM   #133
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Flooring? What piece?
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:20 PM   #134
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Looks like you removed a huge piece of flooring, like it was raised?
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:20 PM   #135
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I suppose I missed something, why did you remove that piece of flooring?
I think they just removed this thing.

Then they're going to be replacing the flooring (I assume?) and redoing the walls behind where the thing was because they are beat up. Am I right?

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