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Old 09-10-2011, 02:24 PM   #76
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


There's a few tricks when using Sherwin-Williams Duration on stucco. One is to be sure that you brush the wall down well before you begin. This paint has a much thicker consistency compared to a budget paint like Behr, Glidden, or many others. This means that additional force is needed to drive the paint into the stucco's cavities. If you didn't do a good job brushing the wall down, you'll be flinging chips of stucco and wet paint all over yourself.

Another tip is to apply very liberally. This means shortening the already-low area coverage of Duration even lower. I went about this in a three step process: get the roller extremely well-loaded, slop it on the area to be worked, and then spread it around. Come back after two or three minutes after its has started to get slightly tacky and load as much paint as possible back into the roller. This method avoids having to apply tons of pressure with the roller while scrubbing back and forth across the uneven surface.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-78.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-79.jpg

Here's a single shot of the second coat, which I applied much thinner. This is just to catch any tiny spots I missed and to ensure even color. I apologize for the haze; the sun was already beating down.

And my progress on the North wall...

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-80.jpg

It was already pushing 85F (29.4C) by the time I took this picture. I was getting pretty stinky and called it an end to my outside work day. Unfortunately, the rest of the crew kept going and we've already passed 95F (35C) with direct sunlight on that wall.

I definitely need to go take drinks outside!

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-81.jpg


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Old 09-11-2011, 08:15 PM   #77
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I'm certain I've probably expressed my dislike for the wood stove in the living room. While it looks very well-built, like it would output a good amount of heat, and was installed with exceptional clearance on all sides, I just can't learn to love it. So when everybody else decided a nap was in order yesterday, I decided it was time to move it.

Let me assure you, it's one heavy monstrosity. Coming in at 24" wide and 22" deep, I can't imagine it weighing any less than 400 lbs. As a fit soldier, I can't lift any one of the sides off the ground without injury. This definitely complicated any plan that I might have to move it.

But I didn't let that stop me. I managed to move it down the 10" drop, nearly 50 feet across pristine laminate hardwood, through two doorways, and outside around a corner. With a combination of 1/2" sheets of plywood, spare 2x4 and 4x4 blocks and a 4-ton trolley jack, I worked it out of here without causing damage to it or anything else... 1/4" at a time.

Here's the beasty in it's new home.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-82.jpg

And the space that I cleared up. Sort of.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-83.jpg

Looking at the nameplate on the rear, I see that it was manufactured May 1989. I'm thinking that I may refinish it and work it into my landscaping plans.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-84.jpg

I wish the front glass wasn't cracked. I'm not aware of any way to fix it and hide the crack, while still being able to operate at the temperatures required of such a pane.

I slinked into the bathtub after dinner. The wife poured some sort of herbal bubble bath in, I fell asleep for an hour, then managed to stumble in a stupor. I think that she gave me a back rub at some point, but it could have been a dream.
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Old 09-11-2011, 08:26 PM   #78
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Rolled over this morning around 4:30, ready to work. Once I realized it was a Sunday, I figured I'd try to sleep in until about 6:00, have a very tall cup of coffee, and slowly get into the day. Can't do too much around here on a Sunday morning until a decent hour... out of courtesy, of course. I blinked for only a moment, my eyes re-focused on the alarm clock, and it was already 8:00.

Managed to pick up where we left off on the painting. The slight morning overcast lingered until around 10am, keeping it nice and cool. The paint went just far enough to cut in once very thickly, apply a respectably thick first coat, and a thinner second coat.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-85.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-86.jpg

Only about 8 fl oz of paint was left over when all was said and done. That works out to exactly 5 gallons for approximately 700 sq ft of wall (140 sq ft/gal). Certainly the mixture of deep-textured stucco and the low average coverage of Duration came together to really put a dent in the wallet. Hopefully it lasts longer than, say, Behr would.

That concludes the last surface to be painted in the exterior blue. I think there's still some small section of eve boards to be done, but my memory fails me at the moment.

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Old 09-11-2011, 08:38 PM   #79
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


The wife wanted to have a second go at the Eggplant Parmesan, and we just happened to be out, so that necessitated a trip into town. While we were out, I convinced her to stop by the Dollar Tree.

We have a few pieces of tupperware left over from a set we pieced together about two years ago. They're nothing more than the blue-and-clear Stor-Ware brand stuff they show on the Dollar Tree website. With between 2 and 8 pieces for the dollar, they've been remarkably good. We've never had one fail or warp, they're still very much as transparent as when we bought them, and we've never had a lid come off or leak. I can't say any of those things for Rubbermade or Tupperware pieces we have.

After picking up about $12 worth of containers (a pretty decently sized set), we were walking out and noticed a shelf full of... drumroll...

ONE BUCK CHUCK!

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-87.jpg

Well, well, well. I couldn't pass this up. I drink wine very infrequently, as does she, but I've spent well beyond $20 a bottle and had it taste like I spent $2. They're more for decoration than anything, but I'm curious just how these taste.

There was a big sign saying "Limit 1 case per customer per day" at the front. The cashier told us that they're extremely popular with the local homeless, said that they receive multiple calls every day asking if it's in, and claimed that it sells out by the case-full in a single day every time.

I might just keep going back for different the different bottles/labels. I do plan for some wine-holders in the coming bookshelf.

Can't wait for the eggplant to be ready... here's just one of the four trays being baked!

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-88.jpg
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Old 09-15-2011, 09:16 AM   #80
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I realize I haven't posted since Sunday, and that's just plain unacceptable with all that's been going on. I admit that I got pretty darn excited by the eggplant parm, dug my fork and knife in without taking a picture, and loved every morsel. We all managed to over-indulge that night. And we just finished the last piece of leftovers last night.

That leaves us at Monday. I must admit that nothing much was worked done. The fascia on the freshly painted wall was given a coat of the ecru trim paint, and looks more or less the same from a normal distance (though it was only primer before).

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-89.jpg

I tried to rehab the small patch of grass in the front between the front patio and the walkway. It was a mess of dead weeds when we got here, and was promptly dug up, sifted through, seeded and top soiled. It was all growing in well, until we forgot to water it for a few days. One side is apparently the neighborhood outdoor cat's litterbox, and the otherside is just bare for no apparent reason. I've been very tempted to throw the cat **** in a bag, write a witty quip on the front, and throw it at the owner's house.

After kicking the cat turds onto the driveway and washing them down to the curb, I gave it a thorough soaking. I took this one before both were done, and the cat's side is the furthest side in the picture.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-90.jpg

I had a pretty major test to study for coming up the following morning, so that ate up my entire afternoon and evening.
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Old 09-15-2011, 09:19 AM   #81
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Before I continue, I have to give a shout out to ExifCleaner, a program I use to scrub all the metadata off my photos. You guys don't really need my GPS coords, right? Hehe.

The program is shareware, and lets me pump up to 7 photos through at a time without paying. It's really convenient to have it on the shell menu, and it's part of the reason why I'm able to show you all these photos.

As I was...


(EDIT: 8000 views and hardly any comments? Yeesh! )
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Old 09-15-2011, 09:26 AM   #82
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Tuesday morning was spent testing and then working the night shift. In between, I managed to get many tile questions answered by the awesome guys over at the flooring section. Thanks guys, especially Bud!

I had measured the laundry room in a bunch of places, checked it almost perfectly square and without any waviness in the walls. I loaded up AutoCAD and was able to get 12.5" tile to fit perfectly with only 6 cuts. I was going to get my local Lowe's to cut those tiles, and sneak 1/4" under the drywall on each side. But Bud had to rain on my parade with that plan, and I'm glad he did!

I bit the bullet last night and picked up a super-cheapo tile saw last night. I was going to use a cheapo tile cutter, but was strongly discouraged from doing so by the only knowledgeable Lowe's employee I've ever met. Mad props to "Bob" at the Rocklin CA store, since I didn't catch your name. (Your Willie Nelson pony tail is truly epic).

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-r03826v15.jpg

I ended up with the Skil 3540. It's only a 7", with a pathetic fence that I don't plan to use, but it should get me through at least one small project. I hope. If it cuts like crap, I'll probably take it back, though I may have to eat the cost of the blade.

If I do end up taking it back, I'll probably pick up the even-cheaper 4" saw at Harbor Freight has some surprisingly high reviews. Again, the fence is garbage on that model, but it scores much higher in reviews that their 7" model. At about half the price of this Skil model, I wouldn't be surprised if it was just as good.

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Old 09-15-2011, 09:44 AM   #83
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I'd done a ton of research on buying tile, and especially what the difference was with HD/Lowes. It all seemed to boil down to the big boxes buying "seconds" to get a lower per-piece price, while the better tile stores would only buy firsts. I shopped with this in mind, very cautiously. And I bought just under twice what I needed for this project. I even checked a few already-opened cases for size, square and thickness variation, and found very few. Note that this was pretty decent $2/sqft (at 12x12) porcelain, and I did see lots more variation in the cheaper (and much thinner) ceramic stuff.

I plan to repack any obviously unacceptable seconds and take them back as defects. "Bob" reassured me that this was fine and happened often, though I get the odd feeling that it may require a fight with customer service.

Here's what I ended up going with.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-8020841240788xl.jpg

Eight boxes of Del Conca Rialto in 12x12.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-8020841480313xl.jpg

Three boxes of Del Conca Noce (on website as 'Tan') in 6x6. You can see the texture of the style a lot better at this magnification. Just what I wanted.

I had wanted to go with a border, but between the cost and the style of the one in this set, I decided to go with a course of the slightly darker 6" instead. Take a look for yourself...

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-93.jpg

$10 per 3.5x12 listello section, and I'm not a fan of the metal-finish accents. They show up extremely poorly in all of the online images.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-94.jpg

$7 per 4x12 section, but with far too much variation for my taste. Note that it's a "natural stone" material and not porcelain.

(EDIT: Removed tons of whitespace on the borders. Sorry for that!)

The plan is to have the 12" on diagonal in the center of the room, followed by the 6" border perpendicular to the walls, and then a small border of the 12" perpendicular on the outside edge. I haven't calculated the approximate size the outside edge will need to be, but will use whatever distance I have left to keep the center section on whole 12" pieces as much as possible. (Hope that makes sense!)

(EDIT2: Here's a quick mockup I threw together in AutoCAD. 1/8" grout joints, assumed 11" and 5" nominal tile sizes. Works out to about 8-19/32" on each side. Going to try another layout so I'm not wasting so much tile.)

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(EDIT3: Added another 12" in the center and that pushes everything else just about 4" out to either side. The new size for the 12" border comes out to 4-11/32", which allows me to get two pieces out of each tile. I like the look a bit more as well.)

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Old 09-15-2011, 10:27 AM   #84
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I also grabbed 2 50# bags of "Pro" modified white thinset, 10 lbs of sanded grout in mushroom, the liquid mix for it, a 1/4"x3/8" trowel, some sponges, etc. Forgot the sealant though. Ugh!

The first thing I had to do was to get the room cleared. The wife moved out the wire racks and laundry accessories before I got home. I stopped the water into the hot water heater, cleared the washer lines and disconnected, and we moved both just out the door onto the back patio. The water heater is another story entirely. A few things have complicated its removal.

As you can see here, it's messily strapped down. Ok, no problem, I'll just undo the straps for now. The second problem was that the drain wouldn't drain, even with a hot tap open in the kitchen. Once it came open, it refused to go through my hose for God-only-knows-what reason, so all the water was removed just over a gallon at a time. Zzzzzz. Most was put into the bath tub for the wife to get washed before work today.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-97.jpg

The first problem you may be able to see in the lower left: the gas line threads didn't swivel on either end. I tried to unthread it without damaging it, but it was just too old and kinked far too easily. I ended up cutting it in half and removing the water heater half. I'll have to replace the line, I suppose.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-98.jpg

The second problem is much of the same. The pressure relief valve is missing its handle, and has the same problem with its threads: there's no collar to spin, it's just soldered on there. Ugh. I don't have a torch, flux or solder, so I ended up taking drastic measures. A jeweler's saw frame and a half dozen 2/0 Laser Gold blades did the trick of slicing the valve in half. But it took forever. Another thing to replace.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-99.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-100.jpg

I gave up for the night, as it was nearly 1am. Today's problems include removing the water lines without destroying the horribly-corroded modification somebody made to the water heater, and disconnecting the vent pipe without damaging the ceiling.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-101.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-102.jpg
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Old 09-15-2011, 10:35 AM   #85
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Before I go tackle the disconnect, I've readied some "before" pictures. This is obviously sheet vinyl, just over 5'3" in width. It's peeling at the corners, has holes in places, and is blotted with stains across most of its surface. Dirt stains have settled into the texture and make it look exceptionally dingy. It's glued directly on the concrete slab, and has been fairly easy to remove so far.

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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-108.jpg

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Old 09-15-2011, 10:36 AM   #86
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Some problem spots include the exterior wall next to the water heater, where the drywall ends 6" short of the floor (see previous images), the exposed-but-painted side of the house's footing, a horribly torn out cut for the stand pipe, an intruding 12.5" L x 4.5" W x 6" H piece of the footing, and missing drywall section for the sprinkler wire. Not sure what I'll do about these yet!

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-109.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-110.jpg

And with that, I'm off to get in over my head!

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Old 09-17-2011, 01:00 AM   #87
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Sure enough, I got in well over my head!

The water heater only took 20 minutes to disconnect the water lines and move outside. I was very lucky that the threads didn't seize, break or strip.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-111.jpg

Of course, the wall was never painted behind it...

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-112.jpg

I had taken the advice of a few members here and got myself a multi-tool. I had walked into Harbor Freight to get the cheapest model with my flyer for $19.99, but decided to compare it with the more-expensive corded model at $49.99. The major differences are that the more expensive model includes 3 attachments (vs 1 attachent), a carry case (vs a cardboard box), it's a blue color (vs red) and is variable-speed 10-20k rpm (vs 20k rpm all the time). I knew I was going to need all 3 attachments in the set, so I priced the cheap one plus the other two attachments, coming up with about $4 difference. Well, heck, why not. My 20% off kicked it and actually made it cheaper. Swweeeeeet! A manual scraper alone could have run over $30 for a nice handle with a few good blades, which I would have completely destroyed on the concrete.

The sheet removal started very well. In a matter of 15 minutes, I had chopped and peeled the entire sheet in managably-sized sections. And that's about all that went well. I started promptly at 7:05am and was scraping backing and glue until about 3:00pm. Yeah, 8 hours straight on my hands and knees running a mutli tool at about 17k rpm. In my haste unhooking the water heater, I had failed to bleed the hot line. Without fail, half way through the job, the hot on the kitchen sink was turned on, air rushed up the spout, and the pipe in the laundry room pissed all over the floor. I let the backing soak it up for a good hour before trying to scrape that section, and contrary to suggestions I've read here, the water did not help loosen it at all. The paper portion came up easier, but the glue became plastic again and turned into a big stretchy sheet of goo.

This was after 2 hours in the morning. I was pretty confident that I'd developed a method of removal with the tool that would get it done quickly. Obviously not so.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-113.jpg

I noticed during my 15 minute lunch break that the bevel of the scraper wasn't quite right. I thought I just goofed and been using the blade up-side-down like an idiot for the previous 5 hours. Not so. I had entirely removed the bevel from the scraper attachment and ground another in the opposite direction. Flipping the blade gave amazing removal ability for a good minute or two, then died back down again. It turns out that I needed to flip the blade every 5 minutes or so to keep a good bevel on the correct side. Needless to say, the scraper attachment is a fair bit shorter now.

Scraping on the diagonal, parallel or perpendicular to the long wall, in arcs or circles or star patterns had absolutely no effect in almost all areas. Some areas had flaky glue, some had goopy glue, some had crusty glue, some had extremely hard glue, some had wavy glue, some had very little glue and yet others had mounds of glue. Every 5 square feet was different. I had hoped for a perimeter glue and a glop in the middle, but this was definitely a roll-on installation. I severly underestimated the removal time required.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-114.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-115.jpg

Re-energized by finishing the impossibly long removal process, I immediately mixed up a 25 lb batch of thinset. While I waited, I staged some tile, and prepared to cut some in half on the diagonal. This is when the carpenter decided he'd had enough of installing gutters and decided to come meddle in my project. We discussed squareness of rooms, of tile, of mud buildup in drywall corners, and many other things. After arguing on how to find the center of the room for 20 minutes (I was dividing to find the midpoint of each wall, then drawing a cross shape - he snapped a line lengthwise, found the center of it, and used a square - both ended up with the same two lines within 1/8"), I was ready to start cutting. Only 9 cuts, no biggie, right?

The first cut went smooth and ended superbly. The second cut chipped badly before I learned to ease all pressure to finish the cut. The eighth chipped out as well. A total of ten cuts was all it took. And by then I had a 25 lb bucket of rocks. I tried to save it by adding some water, but it just didn't work. Instead of a nice sandy cake frosting texture, I got a rocky white paste texture. After doing a terrible job troweling this gunk around and cutting the lines in, and laying two full tiles on the center line of the room in this crud, I gave up. I let the thinset claim the bucket, salvaged by mixer, and called it a night as the sun went down. Did some cleanup and scrubbed some of my own blood off the tile. Locked the valuable tools inside, and left the door removed from the hinges.

Depressing. Wanted a hot bath, but no hot water. Straight to bed then, where I hogged the covers all night, to the chagrin on of the wife, who woke me up repeatedly to try to steal some back. End of day 1.

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Old 09-17-2011, 01:15 AM   #88
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Before we go on, let me tell you about this tile saw. It's a real entry-level DIY saw. And I mean really entry level.

First, it's supposed to look rugged, but it really just looks pathetic to anybody that has ever seen quality tools. Why do manufacturers think cheap neon orange plastic makes products look professional? What they really tell the world is, "I have absolutely not idea how to choose a good tool, so I picked this one that's dressed up like the guys on that construction site I commute past." Anyhow, moving on...

Second, the blade is a real El Cheapo. I expected this, like getting half-filled ink cartridges with a new printer or low-quality sheets in a bedding set. The real disappointment was that it cut like a hot knife through butter for the first 20 cuts, but then wore down to be as effective as a wet noodle against a brick wall. In all honesty, I wish it had just started at wet noodle strength so I hadn't gotten my hopes up.

But both of those things could be forgiven for the price. My biggest pet peeve, by far, is the water supply for this saw. It had a small tank that holds maybe 12 ounces of water on the right-hand side of the saw, under the table. My makeshift table extension, of course, is on the same side. When you turn the saw on, it literally throws 4-6 ounces of water starting the blade up, and only has enough water to cut a single 12" tile before it runs out of water enough to require a refill before the next cut (at least on these 5/16" thick PEI 5 porcelain tiles - I'm sure thinner and softer tile would push through faster and thus take less water). I'm real tired of filling the thing between EVERY cut, especially because of the way sediment builds up in the holder, and because it's inaccessible with any reasonable pitcher, especially with my makeshift table extension. I found it faster to just try to pour and try to hit the side of the blade, allowing it to fill through the slot, while watching on the side. A one-gallon pitcher last me about 5-6 cuts, then it's back inside to refill.

When it's all said and done, I can live with the saw. I've probably pushed over 100 cuts through it already, and can deal with it's quirks. If I were doing a larger area or a pattern with more cuts, this thing would go straight back to the store. I'll keep it for now, and probably sell it after the other small areas are done being tiled.

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Old 09-17-2011, 01:32 AM   #89
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Pissed about being woken up repeatedly during the night, when 6am rolled around, I was up and already at it. A few cups of joe went down while I prepped for my day. I dry set the 12" tiles again. I set up the tile saw again, restacked my makeshift 4x4/2x4 table extension, and poured the thinset - only half a bucket this time! 7:05am came, and I started mixing.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-116.jpg

I got a beautiful, creamy, velvety but sandy texture. Perfect. It went on smooth and thick, notched back well, and was very pliable. I had probably 30 sq ft of the center whole/half tiles up in just over 2 hrs. I'm sure a pro could smoke me when it comes to speed, but I wanted to be very precise with the grout joints and keep it all square! I also learned from the previous day's mistake of trying to mud up 1-2 sq ft at a time and went for 3-10 sq ft at a time, cutting down my the time it took in half.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-117.jpg

I had to mix another small ~3-5 lb bucket to finish the last few tiles, but all was done fairly quickly. The biggest obstacle at this point was only have a 10" inch swath around the perimeter to work in without being able to step on the center. I measured distance to the wall at both ends and the center and found that I had about a 3/16" crookedness over the 10 foot span (if I trust the long walls to be parallel). Not to terrible, I suppose, for only having the center lines snapped. Perhaps I should have snapped perimeter lines.

I got pretty good at jumping over what I'd set, even while carrying objects, and walking sideways along walls. I got all of the 12" border tiles cut to width while stealing spacers here and there, and building mockup borders with the 6" tile, then tearing them back out after I got the measurements so I could walk through again.

I cut the door trim somewhere between 3/8" and 1/2" shorter, measured by lining up a 6" tile snugly against it, rolling the half moon wood blade of the multi tool against the trim, then cutting 1/8" to 1/4" parallel above it.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-119.jpg

I also managed to get the threshold pulled up at both doors. The outside door threshold had apparently been screwed upwards through the plate into the door frame, with the screw heads sitting on the slab. I can only deduce that the door framing must have been assembled outside, the plate screwed up into it, and the whole thing then move into the door rough-in and secured. The interior threshold came up, but with a gigantic glop of glue with it, and I broke off a piece of the underside. Oh wells, time for a nickel upgrade! The outdoor door threshold, expectedly, had a ton of filth underneath.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-120.jpg

Last edited by Thadius856; 09-18-2011 at 03:11 AM.
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Old 09-18-2011, 03:15 AM   #90
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


I got most of the edge pieces cut to width, including both doorways. There's a 1/4" expansion gap on all sides, except where I stayed 5/8" from the edge of the slab because of concrete chunks missing there. None of the door pieces were notched, and I didn't have a clue what I wanted to do in the corner where the footing is exposed. If I was careful at this point, I could put a little weight on the occasional tile so I didn't fall on my face, as they had over 6 hours cure time on them.

It was already at the end of day two... and time for work yet again. After 12 hours of tile work at home, I wasn't much looking forward to a 12-hour shift.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-120.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-121.jpg


Last edited by Thadius856; 09-23-2011 at 10:57 PM.
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