Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Repair > Project Showcase

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-28-2012, 10:00 AM   #346
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Share |
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


The switch over from Comcast TV ("Preferred" package) and Comcast Internet ("Performance" tier) went smoothly. They're not getting that $96, plus $7 for a second cable box, from me any more.

I went with AT&T for home phone (local plus caller ID and call waiting for $23/mo), Sonic.net for internet ("Elite" tier for $20/mo), Netflix Streaming for TV ($8/mo and I get a $20 gift card). My photo uploads are a bit slower, but I tend to upload while writing anyway, so it's a non-issue so far. I traded 16/3 mbps cable for 6/1.5 mbps DSL at less than half the price and without a bandwidth cap.

Comcast keeps calling (once on Wed, once on Thu, thrice on Fri) and begging to have me back. They offered me 25% off, then 50% off, and then asked what I was paying. "Oh, well, I can't beat that, so... uhh... have a good day".

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2012, 10:12 AM   #347
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


So after I finished playing with the new router (Tuesday afternoon), I took a break for dinner, then realized it was the end of my weekend... so I pushed into another project before bed time. The bookcases still needed to be mounted, so I started on that.

We decided that the easiest way to ensure the fasteners hit the studs would be to shim it all off the wall. He calls em nailing cleats, I call em firring strips, and it's not clear who is right. Anyhow, here we are, having cut and screwed them into the library wall. I used a full pound of Rustoleum-coated T-25 head decking screws at #10 x 3", then called it bed time.



I woke up to the carpenter already shimming out my strips. You can see that he started by locating the nearest point on the wall, then stringing off that strip. Pieces of 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" plywood scraps were added to put all points on the same plane. Here, it's fairly early in the shimming process. And yes, those are 3/4" oak plywood strips and the smaller stuff is a mix of scrap cherry, mahogany, birch, etc. Not entirely common.

Had to cut back the chair rail for where the face frame was going to go. Much harder to get the oscillating multi-tool in there once the carcasses are screwed in. I simply stacked two pieces of 3/4" scrap, then rocked them against the chair rail and marked the intersection as my cut line.





This tool has been worth its weight in gold, and I only paid something like $50 for it, three blades and the sanding attachment. The cheaper (non-speed-adjustable) version is routinely on sale for $20 without attachments at HF.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno

Last edited by Thadius856; 01-28-2012 at 10:15 AM.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2012, 10:19 AM   #348
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


When I got home from work, everything was fully mounted, the dishes were done, and a meat loaf was in the oven. Talk about a full service carpenter!



The carcasses were attached to the strips using slightly smaller T-20 head #8 x 1-5/8" decking screws, countersunk just below flush. They're also screwed sideways into each other through the plywood spacers. I was going to stain up a bunch of mushroom cap oak buttons, but he was able to hide every screw in places I had set aside for the under-shelf moulding.



Very straight and tight. These things aren't going anywhere.

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2012, 10:32 AM   #349
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Yesterday I set about to make the moulding. I had decided before I ordered the router bits that I could use the same bit for the 1" picture frames (now 2") and the 1-3/8" x " moulding (now 1" x "). I sketched this up after tracing a photo of the bit from PrecisionBits' website.



From left to right: 1" x " base cap, 1" x " shelf moulding, 2" x " picture frame moulding, Yonico #16135 router bit profile.

As it turns out, they accidentally shipped me #16130 instead, so the top-most detail is a v-groove instead of a trough as in the pictures.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2012, 10:40 AM   #350
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Here, I've already planned out how I want my cut up boards. Because of the enlargement from 1-3/8" to 1", I had to add an extra (small) board for the last piece of moulding. The 24" carcasses will each get four 4' sticks (11" + 22" + 11") and the 36" carcass will get four 7' sticks (11" + 38" + 11"). That way, each shelf comes from one stick of wood... any minor differences in the profile are matched, grain pattern is very similar and color is much more even once stained. The guys at the lumber yard thought I was crazy trying to plan out all the cuts in my head to see how many boards of what size I would need... who's crazy now!?



Two of the pieces just couldn't be thrown on the table saw. One had developed quite a warp since I cut a piece off of it last and the other didn't have a straight enough factory edge to trust. Out came the 8' straight line rip jig.



After that, router table setup was a breeze. We used a 2x4 which I ripped a smooth face on because we don't have whole table feather board (yet). A little ghetto, but it worked surprisingly well to keep the moulding from rolling on its side as it passed the cutter. You can tell the design is very top heavy with not a whole lot of bearing surface.



Several hours of pushing wood through it later, the bit still feels sharp to me. The carbide is intact. The neighbors are probably pissed at me. But I have sixteen 4' sticks and four 7' sticks of the moulding that's (almost) ready to go. Didn't want to do that final 1/32" pass in the dark and mess everything up, so that's on the schedule for today.

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Thadius856 For This Useful Post:
Total Tool (01-28-2012)
Old 01-30-2012, 09:00 AM   #351
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Two days ago, I decided to finally break out my Padauk. Since I already had the frame profile bit in the router from the library shelf casing, it wasn't a bit deal to just raise the bit and change the stock size.

It planed down to " beautifully. Very little planer snipe, almost perfect smoothness, just about zero tearout. Crosscut fine (hard to tell on the radial) and ripped wonderfully. It has really turned out to be a very easy wood to work with, but with two drawbacks:

  1. The sawdust it kicks up looks like you just milled a red-orange Crayola, it gets everywhere, and stains other woods and most paint on contact. It also dyes you hands, but washed off easily with a grapeseed oil-based dish soap, except for the tips of my fingers, which retained the color for two days.
  2. Over time, it will lose its famous color and become a walnut-ty brown hue. Covering with a UV-inhibiting finish (eg, spar urethane) slows the process, but doesn't halt it. Ironically, staining is the only way to hold the red.
See for yourself. I wiped a small area of the inside of the vac so you could compare it to Ridgid orange. The other sawdust is red oak.





Never work this stuff in clothes that you like. It'll stain them pink if the oils are not washed off quickly. Thankfully, I do most of my woodworking in old beat up pajamas. It turned into picture frames pretty easily, same setup as before just this time a little taller.








You can see the difference between the color in direct sun (when UV hits it) and in the shade (how it looks indoors, or even richer red). This was enough sticks for 3 frames matted out to 11x14...

...and I screwed up one piece by mitering it backwards, so it's really 2 frames. I didn't have the profile planned when I bought the wood, so there's plenty of waste (5.5" width and 2" strips). Two frames from a $37 board isn't really that great. Would have been satisfied if it was still 3.

Two brands of band clamps on the way for comparison. Might continue with paddywhack. Might move to something else exotic. We'll see.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno

Last edited by Thadius856; 01-30-2012 at 09:07 AM.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2012, 09:07 AM   #352
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Spent most of yesterday in the attic. While the carpenter was finishing cutting all the shelf trim pieces to fit, I was enlargening the drywall holes with a tool I custom made for the job... a drywall saw with a piece of a shim taped to it so it didn't destroy the bookcase finish.

I spent several hours in the attic. Had to use the 54" auger drill to get through a fire block to run the switch wiring. Several times, in fact. It came out sideways through the drywall on one of the attempts.

But after over 5 hours crouching, kneeling and laying in cellulose, the switch and cans were wired. A quick run to the BORG turned up ELV dimmers at only $22/ea (as opposed to $39/ea for the matching Cooper with the same specs).



Pretty standard dimmer. Replaced the other two in the living room while I was at it, since I was pushing CFLs on a magnetic dimmer, which is a no-no and the reason why I've blown 3 $5 100-watt-equiv CFLs in the last few months. The new ones seem to cut down on the humming and ozone smell too.



I just wish they dimmed lower. Feels like they stop at 50% or something. Maybe that's the lowest these CFLs are supposed to go safely. Sounds dim, but it's still pretty damn bright.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 08:51 AM   #353
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Spent most of Wednesday thinking out the face frame design for the library. I hate that designing and drawing usually requires me to go back and forth with a tape measure. In other words, I wish that real walls were straight and measurements were more accurate with tape measures so I didn't have to get my butt out of the chair for that half of a day.



Laid out all the cherry I had and picked about 2/3 of it for the face frame. It's disgusting how much waste I have between straight lining, rough cutting, ripping to final width, etc. The huge pile of saw dust under the table saw really bummed me out, considering the stuff was over $6/bf because it was air dried something close to 10 years.





It seems like every time I need to plane, the wind kicks up and throws every bit of sawdust into my neighbor's yard. They can't be happy about that, so I removed the little guard that spits the sawdust onto the board and replaced it with a vacuum port. This is some high tech stuff here, complete with a 1-7/8" to 1-1/4" reducer I picked up from the BORG for $1.50. 100% dust pickup up to about 13/16", then it drops to about 90%. Still saves more time than it took to make.



Also got some volunteer time in, a pretty decent grocery run, update immunizations, etc.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno

Last edited by Thadius856; 02-03-2012 at 08:54 AM.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2012, 03:18 PM   #354
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


While I was working, the carpenter sanded, stained, applied three coats of poly and buffed between coats on the shelf moulding we made. I'm amazed at his patience this far into the project. He even installed the of the pieces that he could. The others I haven't notched out yet (until just moments ago) because I'm feeling a cold coming on and trying to rest up.



He's also been helping the wife take baby steps into woodworking. No idea why, but she's beginning to feel more comfortable around the tools and seems to worry less about my appendages staying attached now that she sees the level of control involved for herself. Yesterday she mounted the Spalted Maple key hooks she made, even though I offered to buy her a nice stainless one.



Bookcase progress is moving along nicely. I had to add a new row for the under-shelf moulding since it was such a large undertaking. Updates will be hatched from here forward for easier viewing. We'll also try posting them full-size.

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2012, 01:17 PM   #355
Dorf dude...
 
shumakerscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Grafenwoehr Germany
Posts: 1,723
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Looks great and fantastic documentation. I think you should invite the neighbors over for a movie and beer when you finish. . Keep it up. dorf dude...
__________________
Today is only yesterdays tomorrow, Now get to work!
shumakerscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 07:53 AM   #356
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Thanks for the kind words!

Tried to keep pushing through with the projects, but came down with a head cold. I know the harder I push myself with it, the longer I'll have it, so I only did a few minor things. Just slept 12 hours and still feel like garbage.

Replaced three light bulbs, two light switches, a GFCI, installed two box extenders, and finished cutting one outlet hole in the wainscoting.

Also custom-made some pieces of door casing for the wonky door at the end of the hallway. The door is framed out all wrong in the rough-in, so the right way would have been to re-frame the door an inch to the right. Didn't happen, not enough energy. As such, I had to rip one of the rosette blocks, and rabbet the backs of four of the five pieces. Nothing I love more than rabbeting some floppy ass piece of MDF. :\

The library also got loaded up with books because the wife wanted the shelf back that they were occupying in the closet.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2012, 12:22 PM   #357
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Just realized that after the wife loaded up the bookshelves, I never posted a shot. We have a lot more books than I thought we did! And this is after selling over of the books I bought in college for General Ed.



Spent most of Friday cutting the profile for the stiles. This time, I did the job solo. Ran into a few unexpected issues (namely keeping steady feed rate, angle and pressure as I passed the clamps) but nothing that was show-stopping or destroyed materials. I did lose a bit to snipe and one slip, but still have all ten fingers... that's always a concern when working with this 2.5" tall, 1lb piece of spinning steel.



Ran into one small bark inclusion that was unexpected (not seen from either side of the board when I started), but I'll gladly accept it as a beauty mark.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2012, 12:38 PM   #358
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Spent yesterday scribing the top pieces to my "reverse cathedral" ceiling. No pictures, sorry. At it's narrowest, the top piece is about 1-5/8" tall and at its tallest, it's about 3-1/2" tall. The scribe was done with the compass I picked up for $1 at the crummy Estate Sale, with one of the blunt points reversed. An initial, rough scribe was done with the jigsaw, then hung in place temporarily, and a second, finer scribe was done and cut with the bandsaw. It's not a perfect scribe, but is within 1/8" at all points, and will be covered with crown or quarter-round.

Cut the top/bottom of the face frame to length and mitered the joints. Sanded the top/bottom of the face frame 120-180-220, then stained. Cut the toe-kick pieces, sanded 220 and stained.

Here's the first coat of polyurethane drying.



Also added some nailing for the bottom piece. Here it's being held in place while the construction adhesive cures.

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2012, 10:21 PM   #359
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


(Slept in and then) spent the entire morning cutting in the receptacles for the library unit electrical. Took as long as I expected it would. I had planned on using primarily the jigsaw without much difficulty, but then realized it wasn't the tool for the job when the cord started restricting what angles I could cut at. The multi-tool saved the day, even if it did tear out a little behind the units and make the place smell like burnt popcorn.

After lunch, I started putting up the LEDs. Each 5m strand consists of ten 30-led strips, and each strip can be cut between every 3rd LED. It reasons to follow that I installed 1500 LEDs today. I feel better having realized I got something done today! Here they are temporarily taped on, getting ready to install the top/bottom of the face frame tomorrow.



The carpenter spent the morning working on the picture frames. He was getting frustrated with poorly fitting joints, until he noticed that the miter saw was off my about one half of a degree. After adjustment, the joints are much tighter! Unforunately that makes each frame about 1/8" smaller, and thus they now need custom-size glass and matting. :\



The one on the left is drying in the Bessey band clamp (which I prefer), while the one on the right is drying its second coat of polyurethane (clamped with the Wolfcraft band clamp, which he prefers). Notice the color shift away from orange towards red after the water-based polyurethane was applied. I would have expected no change, with oil-based enhancing the orange tone. Not so. Both cut from the same board.



Such beautiful wood. So easy to work with, and relatively forgiving. No idea why some people feel the need to using a grain filler with this stuff. Might pick some more up tomorrow.
__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno

Last edited by Thadius856; 02-15-2012 at 10:26 PM.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2012, 11:20 AM   #360
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Default

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Been working on getting other things sorted out recently (notably my digital filing cabinet and my Gmail account), so I haven't put a huge amount of time into the project. However, I did buy some more Padauk.

Went to a place that is really a hardwood floor manufacturer, but also has a retail hardwood store front. They had a pile of Select & Btr Cherry for $2.50/bf (read: lowest hardwood grading there is) that looked like they'd been chewed up in a planer accident, then warped to all hell. I'm glad I passed.

When I inquired about the price of their (questionable-looking) Padauk, they quoted me at "$15-16/bf". Ummm, yeah, nope! We drove across town to our preferred supplier and they still had most of a strap of beautiful pieces at $8/bf.

Picked up four 9' pieces, two 8.5" wide, two 4.5" wide. Looks like 19.5 bf to me, but they charged for 19.13, so I'm not complaining. $185 in Padauk, but should make eighteen 11x14 frames if I don't screw up too many. *cross fingers*



Also stopped by a woodworking tool store and drooled at the $5k+ saws and $600 dovetail jigs. I won't be owning anything like those any time soon!

__________________
Check out my on-going Project Thread!
Current Project: Whole House Data Wiring
Back Burner: Drywall Patching
Planning: Kitchen Reno
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
mobile home service to bond or not to bond rikmac Electrical 35 03-17-2010 03:47 PM
Attic insulation in ranch home lchilds72 Building & Construction 6 11-29-2008 11:04 AM
Anyone have a sample materials price list for 4br ranch home a re-wire job? ehoez Electrical 4 09-24-2008 01:00 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.