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Old 10-23-2011, 04:10 PM   #166
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Wow, Lots of work and lots of progress! Looking good.

I'll be watching so lots of pics are always good!
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Old 10-23-2011, 09:19 PM   #167
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Not nearly as much progress today as I'd hoped. Got two coats of paint each on 2 full sheets and the one chopped in thirds (the drippy piece I'll use for partial sheets). Also removed the base board and door trim from another wall.

Opened a can of The Great Stuff to foam the space above the door. Ended up doing the same abound the bathroom door. Planned out the measurements for the stairs piece. Marked the studs on one of the short walls.

Only got the right-most sheet put up. After it was painted, I crosscut 3/8" off the top right corner and removed up to 1/2" when ripping the scribe mark. Unfortunately, that meant I grinded MDF saw dust into the paint, so it'll need a third coat. I cut out the receptacle and hung it. There's one stud off layout that I wasn't aware of, so I made a few nail holes finding it.

I'm pretty disappointed in the progress, really. I did learn quite a bit in the process though. The center sheet will go up whole, less receptacle cutout, so I'm sure it'll go up in the morning. I'll probably finish laying out the last few pieces around that time.

Since I'm posting from my phone, I can't attach pictures. I'll write up my the tips I learned and today's images while I work on my coffee and wait until I can start making noise.
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Old 10-24-2011, 09:55 AM   #168
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


It's morning again, still too early to swing a hammer, so I've been marking studs and the rest of the sheet that I have up on 8/12. As promised, here's some tips and images from yesterday's lessons learned.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-248.jpg

Here we have one of the full sheets, still drying. It's a whole lot harder to paint these lower quality MDF bead board sheets, as they have small imperfections in the supposed-to-be-perfectly-smooth surface. I found that I could knock down most of the imperfections with a quick pass or two of a fine foam block. This also gave me a slightly rougher surface (though not visibly so) for good adhesion of the paint.

I used a 3/16" nap mohair roller. This was my first time using a roller this thin, so it hadn't occurred to me just how little paint a nap this small could hold. All the same, it applied the first coat thinly with a very slightly texture. If you wanted to keep the perfectly smooth surface, you would probably want to use a 1/8" nap foam roller. However, I liked the slight texture that the mohair added.

Start by loading the roller fully, then work along the lengthwise across the sheet, four sets of grooves at a time. The main goal at this point is to apply enough pressure while scrubbing the length of the panel to get the paint worked into the beads. Be aware of the edge of the roller you're working, keeping the arm side of the roller facing towards the unpainted side. Once you get the beads worked, quickly re-roll the section you just worked. With a quick-setting paint like the Sherwin-Williams Duration Home Satin, time is your enemy, because you'll leave nasty lines if you don't re-roll it fast. Continue across the sheet, four grooves at a time. Once done, hang the sheet slightly off your work table and gently roll the long edges, where the sheets butt.

Don't worry too much about the short 4' edge. No matter what size you cut the bead board, the top and bottom edges will always be underneath the base board or the chair rail. I'm keeping the factory edge down at the floor because it's a whole lot uglier than the edges I've been creating with my circular saw guide rail.
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Old 10-24-2011, 10:16 AM   #169
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


After removing the door trim, I revealed the door rough-in.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-249.jpg

There was a good 3/4" gap, so I figured I'd fill it in with foam for some insulation. This is an interior door, but this wall is insulated as well, and it often acts as exterior wall (when the laundry room door is open for ventilation). I may recoup the cost of the can of foam some day, but it was more for my own peace of mind. I'd rest easier knowing that I've done all that I've done everything I could to enhance energy efficiency and stabilize room temperatures.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-250.jpg

With the first panel about to go up, I decided it was obligatory to sign the wall. Even if myself or a future owner pulls down the sheet and decides to texture/paint the wall, it will be easily covered. I used a laundry Sharpie, so it may be washable, though I highly doubt it (as it's on primed green drywall).

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-252.jpg

Here we have the door moulding and base off of the short wall. You can see I started with a can of fire block foam, which promptly clogged, so I went to regular foam. It's a shame, because the fire block stuff was way more expensive. Over half the can just wouldn't come out without spraying out the side of the nozzle.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-253.jpg

Not sure if you can see the bow here at the bottom of the short wall, but it's fairly major. The drywall bows out where it covers the foundation wall and sill plate (the bottom 6 inches or so).

If the walls were closer to normal, I could just measure and cut free hand, even odd angles. That would allow me to cut from the rear of the sheet. Unfortunately, that just isn't the case, so I'm having to repaint the front of each sheet that the saw's table touches.

I think the 32" pieces will go up faster, but no guarantees. I only have 4 hours or so to work today, so I better get to it!
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Old 10-24-2011, 01:38 PM   #170
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Can't wait to see this done.
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Old 10-25-2011, 03:16 AM   #171
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Today was a... long day.

I managed to stretch that four available hours into twelve. The upside is that I got a got a lot more done than I expected. The downside is that as I type this during my lunch break at work I'm fighting off sleep. I may just end up napping in the parking lot this morning before I attempt to drive home.

Unfortunately, I decided to leave for work at a reasonable time, and between that decision, cooking dinner and getting ready, I didn't have time to run the pictures through the EXIF removal utility. I may as well write the day's notes while I'm at it. I apologize in advance if it's hard to follow without the pictures inserted yet.
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Old 10-25-2011, 03:34 AM   #172
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Progress today was, again, slower than I expected. I wonder if quality materials would make this go faster... anyway.

The corner you see here is the bane of my existance. (You saw this one last time post).

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-253.jpg

Just a corner? Hardly. It's plain evil. But we'll come back to that. This is what I managed to get done as of the lunch break.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-254.jpg

You can see here that I managed to finish two full sheets and two one-third sheets. At this point, the first full sheet is nailed every 8 inches around the edge and every 12 inches in the field. I used zero construction adhesive because I want the next homeowner to be able to remove the paneling without having to re-hang the drywall. Not that I want them to rip it down... I just don't want to destroy perfectly good materials.

My aversion to glue adds a considerable amount of time because after I hang the sheet (making it look like a Hellrazer) I then have to drive each and every nail close to flush without damaing the sheet. And then after that, I have to countersink each one ever so slightly with a 3/32" punch. With only 1/4" of MDF, it's a very fine balance between countersunk and right-through-the-sheet.

The second full sheet is still in that Hellrazer stage. The smaller sheets only have half a dozen nails in them, just enough to hold them in place. I took extra care to make sure their tops were level, only to find out that the floor has a considerable slope, all the freakin way from one side of the room to another. Luckily, this is the low corner.
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Old 10-25-2011, 03:42 AM   #173
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Back to the evil corner. Why evil? The level in this shot is absolutely, perfectly plumb. You may even be able to see the bubble resting dead center.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-255.jpg

That's a 48" level, by the way. Yeah, that's right. At the steepest point, it's a 15/16" kick in.

After cutting down the sheet about 3/8" in height, I resolved the lower corner problem with a particularly aggressive scribe line. Leaving about an inch excess for wiggle room, I freehanded the curves with the circular saw. Dead on. After a few very precise measurements, I ended up setting my square at 7/8" in and scribing off the scribed cut. Perfect fit, once I knocked off a small piece of the top-right corner.

The only problem is that I removed all 3/8" from the top. The concrete floor is fairly wavy as well, so I really should have taken some from there.

Anyhow, here we have all three full-length sheets up. The last one still needs to be countersunk.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-256.jpg

Just in case you were curious as to how that ugly corner turned out...

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-257.jpg

...I'd say fairly well.
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Old 10-25-2011, 03:52 AM   #174
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


And here we have the third one-third sheet going in.

I'm getting something like " to 3/8" slope per 4 ft. I hope it's not too obvious when the opposing wall ends up something like 1" shorter over a 19'6" span.

Unfortunately, the center channel of the surround sound and the component shelves had to come down for all of this to be possible. I ended up just removing the 5.1 in its entirety temporarily and moving the networking devices to the floor with the DVR.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-258.jpg

While removing the first shelf, three of the six large screw heads stripped right out. Crummy bargain basement Chinese fasteners. I managed to back one of them out with all of my weight against the drill while surging the speed, but the other two just spun and sprayed shavings. I ended up drilling about 1" into the heads with a drill bit slightly smaller than the shank of the bolts, then knocking the head off with the BOSS.

Back to my chair rail dilemma. It's within 1/4" of the bottom of the TV mount bracket. This leaves only enough room for me to overlap the chair rail, not butt it above. I was thinking I might just plan a 45 dip/notch in the middle sheet, but the TV's about 6" off center to the room. If I center the notch on the TV, it might look odd. If I center it on the room, it might look odd. Building the chair rail on top of the bead board seems like the right idea. I think I could make it look good with the chair rail extended 1/8" past it above and filling that gap with white paintable caulk. We'll see how adventureous I feel when I get back to that piece again.

This Saturday I'm going to be sneaking some Adopt-a-Highway trash pickup in between a few shifts. I may not get much done (except on Thursday) until next Monday or Tuesday.

We shall see!
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Last edited by Thadius856; 10-25-2011 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 10-25-2011, 03:59 AM   #175
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


One question, why do you volunteer all the time?
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Old 10-25-2011, 09:32 AM   #176
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Feels good, looks good on a resume, and it just might push me to my next promotion 6 months early... which, if I got it, would allow me to test for the following promotion a year earlier.

Also going to apply for a commission one of these days, and it doesn't hurt there either.
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Old 10-25-2011, 09:11 PM   #177
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Added the pictures... but gotta run!

No progress today. Just been a day of rest.

Ready for some barbacoa!
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:27 PM   #178
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Some work done today. Still slow going, though. I figured it would pretty much be sure from here on out, considering the previous pace of this project. I suppose the installation may have been faster with a wood shop available to me to fabricate quality traditional bead board, but then I'd have to consider the fabrication time as well.

All of tonight was spent one one single piece... the stairs piece.

I started with the 4'x8' sheet, cutting it down to 4'x64". I then ripped it down to just over 40". I laid out the cuts roughly on the rear of the piece, then roughly cut them out. Already I had a pile of small scrap pieces.

The floor is sloped. The outside corner I'm butting against is sloped. The wall is wavy. The door casing it abuts on the other side is out of plumb. The stair is sloped, and has a protruding tread. Unfortunately, that means this was a much more arduous piece than I wanted to make it. Measure, rough cut, fit, finish cut, fit, and then probably re-cut. For each of approximately 10 cuts.

Here's the result, so far.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-259.jpg

It's still not quite done because I need to cut the treads out. Note that I was going for 1/4" clearance between the floor, treads and risers for expansion. It looks a little messy right now, but it'll clean up nicely.

I'll be building up the bottom portion where the base will attach. I'm not sure how else to describe that plan, so you'll have to just wait and see if I'm being unclear.

After dinner, I'll tape out the remaining studs and cut the stair treads. I've left the piece at 32-1/2" tall at both ends so I have wiggle room for getting it even with the piece on the other side of the door. That piece is about 26' from the low spot at -1/4" per 4' slope, so I estimate the panel with end up being approximately 30-1/2" at the bottom end. The diagonal cut will maintain the same slope as the stairs.
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:05 PM   #179
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Got a lot done yesterday.

Tried to knock out two birds with one stone by playing items from the DVR while working on the paneling. I started with the panel under the TV by slightly expanding the lower end of the outlet holes. The next two sheets went up pretty easily, and met in the first corner that's close to straight and plumb. I was happy about that.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-260.jpg

After I turned the corner, I had to start working around odd framing layouts. There's no stud in the corner. The first sheet had to be shortened 3/4" so I'd be able to still hit the studs, and the next piece is where hell began. The door is out of plumb and the floor takes on a steeper slope, so combined with the uneven factory edge and the slope of the previous piece, it was a piece that got cut on 3 sides.

Plus, the wall gets rather... wavy. Remember that I'm using no adhesive, so I'm nailing top/bottom, and every 8" between, to get the bead board to follow the waves.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-261.jpg

That left me at the stair piece. I had marked it several times before the top side rough cuts, so that just left me with a mess of pencil marks in smudged fingerprints. The bottom ended up exactly 31", and would have been more if not for the up-slope on the previous piece. Go figure.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-262.jpg

To get the height to carry across, I used a level carry the top edge of the bead board to the door frame, then drove a paneling nail through that line. That became the rest for one end of the level, and then another was driven on the other side of the doorway perfectly level.

After re-calculating the final cut line about 5 times, I ended up having to highlight the correct line in red sharpie. I was so tired of less-than-four-foot pieces sliding around under my fence, so I freehanded the cuts. The top is... so-so in quality. But since it will be built over with the chair rail and not butted, I'm not too worried.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-263.jpg

Once I was cleaning up, I was reflecting on how much faster these pieces seemed to go than the last few. And that's when it hit me... I had one more receptacle cover than I had receptacles. Crap! Somewhere behind one of the panels is an outlet. I think I know where, but with the panels already nailed on 8" and countersunk, there's no way it was coming off.

I think I'll have to poke around with a drill bit. The wife is fairly certain she knows what stud it's on, and we know the height is about the same as the others in the room.

Unfortunately, the non-contact voltage tester isn't able to pick it up through the paneling. :\
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:17 PM   #180
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Since it was about dinner time and getting too cold outside for paint, I had to repurpose the kitchen table. Sorry honey!

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-264.jpg

All of the moulding received two thinner coats of Kilz2 interior/exterior latex primer. Just like the bead board, I'm hoping to lock moisture levels where they are. It's been resting on the living room floor for over a week, so it should be well-acclimated.

Between coats, I started filling the nail holes on the paneling. I broke down and bought a small tub of the pink stuff so that I could actually see what I was doing with such fine detail. White-on-white in this situation would have made things far harder, because I wouldn't have been able to see bubbles.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-265.jpg

After that dried, it all got a light sanding.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-266.jpg

And then a light spot coat of primer.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-267.jpg

A few spots will need a second coat because they shrunk as they dried, so that's where I'm off to now!
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