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Old 10-11-2011, 06:23 PM   #136
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Alright, now I get it.

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Old 10-11-2011, 06:25 PM   #137
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


That is, indeed, the correct "thing". And yep, just about spot on with the replacement.

With central heat working very well and little access to free dry wood, I didn't see much of a use for a wood stove. Additionally, it was caked in creosote, appeared improperly installed from the attic, and was all single-wall. The purchase inspection noted that it looked like the pipe had caught fire more than once, but with no apparent damage to the roof.

I'm going to put in the same porcelain tile that I just put in the laundry room, unless perhaps I can get a perfect match to the hardwood from Lowe's, where it seems just about everything recent in this house came from.
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:27 PM   #138
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Laminate flooring is pretty cheap on HomeDepot right now.
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Old 10-11-2011, 06:33 PM   #139
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Problem is that I'm a wanna-be perfectionist, so any mismatch would drive me slowly insane.

There's going to be a 3-piece full-wall bookshelf there, hiding the wall and covering some of the flooring.

Here's an unfinished drawing of the bookshelf I'm planning out.

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Old 10-12-2011, 05:08 AM   #140
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Being in between work shifts, I didn't have too much time for the house today. I have dental visit #4 in a few hours, and doubt that I'll feel all that great afterwards, but if I do, I'm planning to take the load of building waste to the dump. I'll need to pick up some drywall on my way back. (I could really use some coffee about now!)

I did manage to get the old drywall taken down. I just gave the crow's foot a couple solid whacks to get it under the nail heads and the pulled right out. There was an odd assortment of standard wood nails (8p?), roofing nails, horseshoe nails (t-shaped head) and finishing nails. Go figure.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-194.jpg

You can definietly still make out the location of the old garage door. There's also some gimpy pieces that were used for a place to attach the drywall around the edges. The more I look at the picture, the less I like the idea of two 12' pieces. Pretty sure I'll just go with the three 8' pieces instead. I really don't want to have to build a horizontal brace to attach the drywall to if I go horizontally, so I'm avoiding it.

I was going to install insulation, but I may just leave it the way it is and put in a few blocks for a fire break to stop the blown-in insulation from falling into the walls from the attic. Not very cool.

Of course, everything's coated in white dust again. Who coulda guessed...
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Old 10-13-2011, 05:38 PM   #141
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


What a day so far!

Started off with a run to the dump, getting rid of 1920 lbs of what I tore out from the living room - nearly a full ton! It would have actually hit a ton if I hadn't saved the pieces of the hardwood I removed from the side of the raised section for spares. I'd wanted to get that done yesterday, but schedules were what they were.

I did get a quarter of the way through Paper Towns by John Green yesterday, which I'm (so far) liking much more than the other book of his I recently finished, An Abundance of Katherines. I'm at a pivotal plot point,, I'm pretty certain I've already predicted what's going to happen, even though there's only minor hints so far. I just hope the rest of the book doesn't go emo after it, if it does indeed come to be. Anywho...

After the dump, we made a run down to Lowe's for some materials. With a few pieces of the living room hardwood in hand, they couldn't match it. It's a plain-Jane piece of 3/8" tongue-and-groove, but most of their stuff was thicker and/or odd types of proprietary speed lock joints. There was some stuff going out of stock that was similar, but off by 1/16th in thickness and with lower-quality ply. Otherwise, a near-perfect match. It appears the living room section is red oak, and fairly stripey pieces at that. Looks like we're sticking with the imported Italian porcelain tile that I put into the laundry room.

While we were there, I noticed something very... familiar. See for yourself:

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-195.jpg

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-196.jpg

Yep. That's right. The same stuff I just removed from the laundry room. While every other sheet offers a 5 to 20 year warranty, this stuff is the only one that comes with a 1 year limited warranty. It's also by far the cheapest, with the next cheapest (to the left in the picture) coming it at around $1.00/sq ft.

It relieves me to know just how cheap and new that stuff is, because that means I certainly did not disturb asbestos when I removed it.
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Old 10-13-2011, 05:55 PM   #142
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


While we were there, I picked up three 4x8 sheets of drywall. The regular 1/2" stuff was in the 6.xx range, but I splurged () on the green anti-bacterial stuff at 9.98 per sheet.

In case anybody was curious as to the price of a project like this, read on. Otherwise, just skip to the next post.

One 50lb bag of heavily modified thinset in white @ $28.98
One bag of the Tavy 1/8" X-Men* tile spacers @ $5.18
Two metal NM switch boxes with stud brackets @ $2.17
One gallon of Valspar drywall primer @ $12.98
One bucket of low-dust premix mud @ $5.95
One 300' roll of green no-mold drywall mesh tape @ $6.98
One 5lb box of 2" drywall screws @ $6.47
One fine grid angled sandpaper block @ $5.97

After 10% discount and after 7.25% sales tax, I ended up at $103.05.

I already have some tile on hand, maybe even enough for this project, so I didn't bring any more home. I at least have enough to get me started and well into at least the 6th level tiling-a-trapezoid-shaped-area-with-a-3-pattern-field-and-cutting-it-all-with-a-dull-blade-on-a-cheap-ass-tile-saw Hell. Sounds like fun, right?



* Obviously there's no picture or mention of X-Men on the bag, but there damn well should be! I mean... see for yourself.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-197.jpg
1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-198.jpg
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Old 10-13-2011, 06:05 PM   #143
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Anyhow, back home, I started on the electrical. Off went everything except the new circuit I added because it's that only one I feel 100% confident knowing exactly what's on the circuit and what isn't. Plus, Pandora streamed through the TV, piped over the 5.1, is a whole lot better sounding than my Ryobi worksite radio.

The new switch boxes with stud brackets went on. The only receptacle on this wall previously was about 3.5' from the left edge of the wall. For reference, the wall is approximately 11'6" wide. It had also been buried deep between the faux-rock, and we didn't even notice it was there until over a month after we moved in.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-200.jpg

As it happened, the power came from the right side of the wall, so it was no problem cutting that piece of Romex back to the first new box (4' from the right side). It turns out that whoever put up the last drywall nailed straight into that old piece of Romex, and I found a corroded hole in it when pulled out the excess. Each side of all of the wires got stapled for good measure.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-199.jpg
200th picture, YEY!

New Romex went from the first new box to the second new box (roughly centered on the wall), and from the second new box to the existing box. All is 14-2 on a 15 amp breaker. Somewhere closer to the panel it ties into 14-2 without a ground, so I'll leave the ground disconnected on the new receptacles as a visual if I end up selling the home. The question is really, 'where does it connect to the original wiring?' because I haven't found the junction yet. I hope it's not another glad-I-didn't-die-in-an-electrical-fire-while-sleeping DIY bundle of inline electrical tape ball goodness.

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Old 10-13-2011, 06:28 PM   #144
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Once the electrical was done, I cut and installed three fire blocks from random scrap 2x4 pieces to keep attic insulation from continuing to drop down into the wall. I also cleaned out what dirt and grime was left in the bottom of each stud pocket, finding an unusual amount of dirt and a few dead weeds. I think the previous homeowner left the wall open on the outside for some time when installing that same ugly stone on the other side of the wall. Ugh.

These walls are wavy. And I don't just mean wavy... I mean wavy. The living room was taped and mudded last time by a complete amateur, so my goal is to make my first time look better than theirs.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-201.jpg

Note the obvious gap in the upper left. We ended up transferring a line from the ceiling to the drywall with a makeshift compass. We tried to trim to leave at least 1/8" for a gap from the slab where possible. It worked in most places, but not everywhere. Also note that the bottom isn't all the way pushed in for the above photo.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-202.jpg

Closer up, it becomes much more obvious. See the wavy line on the adjoining wall? That's where it was never textured, primed, or painted because they just slapped on the faux-stone before painting, and that's where it happened to cover. It should make for very interesting work for me.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-203.jpg

Also check out the segment of the wall that was also not textured, primed or painted done because of the fireplace platform. I don't feel like spending $80 for a poor-quality texture gun, so I think I'm going to just fully panel the new drywall in white bead board, and all other walls up to 32".

I tried to find some at Lowe's, but they only had five HORRENDOUSLY beat up sheets that I'd have to trim 6-12" from each side to make use of. No way I'm paying their price for such poorly handled materials. They did have a few very nice stain-grade pieces, but at $40/sheet, I'm not going there to just hide with a bookcase.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-204.jpg

And here we are after almost 4 hours from when we got home. Before I'm flamed for the screw pattern, understand that I eyeballed the spacing. It wasn't until after we stepped back after finishing that the carpenter said "you know, normally you would go 8 & 12 on the spacing..." LOL.

I did have use of decent impact drill, which made things easier. I did the first 1/5th with a standard PH2 tip in an impact driver, then we located the specialty drywall tip with a circular head that sets the correct depth every time. I don't know the name of this tool, so please feel to chime in if you know what it's called. I ended up doing more damage with it when I'd slip than the sanity I was saving praying I wouldn't break the paper, so I just went back to the last 1/3rd of the room with the standard bit and driver.

1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project-205.jpg

A close-up of the center section. The only thing that worries me is that expansion might reek havoc on the pieces that touch the slab. Otherwise, I'm almost rested enough to try taking on the mudding.
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Old 10-13-2011, 06:30 PM   #145
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


You motivate me, how hard was it to put up drywall?
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Old 10-13-2011, 06:36 PM   #146
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dinggus View Post
You motivate me, how hard was it to put up drywall?
First, thank you!

Second, hanging it was easier than I remembered from the last time I did it. Then again, I was about 10 years old back then, so a full sheet felt a lot lighter this time around. If this was a new home or new framing, I can only imagine it would be quite a bit easier. Most of our time was spent accounting for the waviness of the other two walls and the ceiling.

I think the difficulty in drywall installation is in the tape and mud. That seems to be why the call drywall an art. I'll let you know how it goes tonight, assuming I get my fat ass out of this chair and attempt it.

I'm almost certain that having an experienced carpenter helping me along made a lot of things go smoother. While he had me do the bulk of the labor, I'm not sure I would have been able to determine the off-square cuts as easily or as cleanly as he had.
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Old 10-13-2011, 11:40 PM   #147
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


Just got done with the tape and first coat of mud. And for anybody who hasn't taped and mudded drywall before, let me just say, that was way easier than I expected. After having read so many seemingly conflicting tutorials, tips, and "ZOMGWTFHELPME!!!!1!!1" posts, I was starting to get worried that I'd screw it up royally. In reality, all it takes is a steady hand, patience and time. Lots of time.

The seams between the new sheets were easy. Very easy. Taping took seconds there. The left side of the wall where it butted tightly against the old drywall was easy too. The hard spots were those with the 1/8" - 3/8" gaps.

Standby for before-and-after pictures after dinner!
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:33 AM   #148
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


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Old 10-14-2011, 12:36 AM   #149
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


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Old 10-14-2011, 12:39 AM   #150
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1958 Ranch Home, Full of Character - First Home, First Major Project


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