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-   -   Replacing dishwasher (http://www.diychatroom.com/f47/replacing-dishwasher-178774/)

dishe 05-04-2013 09:28 PM

Replacing dishwasher
 
The house I just bought has a pretty old dishwasher that I'd rather not use for personal reasons (long story). The good news, however, is that someone I know just updated their kitchen and offered me his beautiful stainless steel washer. If I can come haul it away from his garage, its mine.

But then I'll have to figure out how to install it myself.
I'm new to this stuff and have no idea what is involved in installing a dishwasher. Is this something I should be able to figure out without any prior plumbing experience (beyond the occasional repairing of a toilet)?

gregzoll 05-04-2013 09:37 PM

Suggest getting the unit to your place, and then have a local mom & pop plumber do the job, over choosing one with the largest ad in the Yellow pages, or flashier trucks, since most mom & pop operations will be cheaper, due to less overhead, but also the workmanship you will find is better. Especially if you can find one that the family history like my guy, this stuff is in their blood. You will need electric for it also. Most will use a 15 amp circuit, and in some areas, you can share the same circuit for the disposall, if the total of the two appliances equal no more than 20 amps, then you can use a single 20 amp circuit for both appliances. You would have a outlet that the disposall & dishwasher would plug into.

Also depending on your area, they may request that that outlet be gfci protected, so check with your local code office.

Msradell 05-04-2013 10:03 PM

As long as you have a few basic tools and some knowledge of plumbing and electricity, it's a very simple project. Just turn the power off (or unplug it) and turn the water to the unit off. Just take everything apart carefully and install the new one in the same sequence. The water connection is just behind the lower front panel, you can remove the panel with a couple of screws. If the unit is direct wired in the wiring connections will also be here. The drain line will either connect to your garbage disposal or to the drain lines of your sink. Again, just take everything apart carefully and put it back together in the same way with the new one. There is very little that can go wrong.

mj12 05-04-2013 10:05 PM

dishwashers are pretty easy to replace, starting from none can be a lot more work.

dishe 05-05-2013 07:32 AM

Yeah, I gather that since I already have one that I'm removing, it shouldn't be too much work right?

I just don't know what I'm doing and was hoping to get some tips from someone who has. I'm not even sure what "the right tools" entails.

Daniel Holzman 05-05-2013 08:49 AM

Just a word of caution. You are assuming that the existing dishwasher is properly installed. This is not necessarily the case. For example, in my town it is necessary to have a visible switch to turn the dishwasher on and off. This is due to a local interpretation of the building code, don't exactly know why. My old dishwasher did not have such a switch.

The drain for the dishwasher typically requires an air gap. Easy to install as long as you know what an air gap is, and know to install it. Other little details may be important. If you plan to hard wire your dishwasher, make sure you have a properly grounded circuit.

This is not a tremendously difficult project, but you did say you had little experience, so I am pointing out a few potential pitfalls. Note that installation details often depend on local interpretation of building code.

Msradell 05-05-2013 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 1172895)
Just a word of caution. You are assuming that the existing dishwasher is properly installed. This is not necessarily the case. For example, in my town it is necessary to have a visible switch to turn the dishwasher on and off. This is due to a local interpretation of the building code, don't exactly know why. My old dishwasher did not have such a switch.

The drain for the dishwasher typically requires an air gap. Easy to install as long as you know what an air gap is, and know to install it. Other little details may be important. If you plan to hard wire your dishwasher, make sure you have a properly grounded circuit.

This is not a tremendously difficult project, but you did say you had little experience, so I am pointing out a few potential pitfalls. Note that installation details often depend on local interpretation of building code.

While you bring up some valid points regarding variations in code requirements, the OP really doesn't have to worry about them if he doesn't want to. If the replacement is one for one, which it will be in this case a permit will not be required, thus the installation will not be inspected.

The 2 requirements that you brought up may be required in some places, but there are literally millions of dishwasher is running without either of those in their installation. The switch, really doesn't make any sense and I'm not sure how they interpret the code to require one. The air gap is required in many areas, but especially when the drain hose connects to a garbage disposal, I'm not sure how necessary it is.

The OP shouldn't have any problem replacing his dishwasher with a new one if he knows how to use a few basic tools and takes the minimum safety precautions I mentioned in my 1st post.

TheEplumber 05-05-2013 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Msradell (Post 1173129)
While you bring up some valid points regarding variations in code requirements, the OP really doesn't have to worry about them if he doesn't want to. If the replacement is one for one, which it will be in this case a permit will not be required, thus the installation will not be inspected.

The 2 requirements that you brought up may be required in some places, but there are literally millions of dishwasher is running without either of those in their installation. The switch, really doesn't make any sense and I'm not sure how they interpret the code to require one. The air gap is required in many areas, but especially when the drain hose connects to a garbage disposal, I'm not sure how necessary it is.

The OP shouldn't have any problem replacing his dishwasher with a new one if he knows how to use a few basic tools and takes the minimum safety precautions I mentioned in my 1st post.

I wouldn't make such a blanket statement. This may be the way your community operates, but any plumbing work except drain cleaning or leak repair requires a permit in my area (including DW, and WH) and the state next to me. Granted- it is up to the OP to decide on permits or not- including electrical.

OP- you can handle the install- when you're ready- you can start a thread in plumbing and post pictures of your existing water and drain hook ups- we'll walk you through the process- same with the electrical

gregzoll 05-05-2013 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber (Post 1173138)
I wouldn't make such a blanket statement. This may be the way your community operates, but any plumbing work except drain cleaning or leak repair requires a permit in my area (including DW, and WH) and the state next to me. Granted- it is up to the OP to decide on permits or not- including electrical.

That may be in your area, and there are a few other areas across the U.S., but also in my area, no permits are needed if the homeowner does their own electric, plumbing, major repairs if over a certain dollar amount.

Only time that a homeowner would need to pull a permit in my area, is if they do a major remodel of the structure, add on to the structure, build a new detached or attached garage. Other than that it is the trust between the homeowner and the city, where our city says that it is fine for homeowners to do their own work on their residence, as long as they live there more than two years, or plan on living there more than two years.

There are only a few things that I hire out to have done, but majority is done by myself, such as electric, and no complex plumbing issues, where I would need a torch or the time to do the work. That I leave to hire my guy that I use for hvac & plumbing. Roofing and outside structure work, I have another guy that I use for that stuff.

mj12 05-05-2013 03:38 PM

Basically, 2 screws at top of dishwasher, then take off lower cover, adjust the leveling legs down, slid out dishwasher, remove water and electrical. Slide out, slide new one in. Check for leaks. As pointed out above, good chance your old one is not installed properly.

md2lgyk 05-05-2013 08:02 PM

I would determine the exact model number of the new dishwasher and try to find an installation manual for it. More than likely there's one online if the current owner doesn't have one. While most installations are similar, there can be differences. For example, mine doesn't have the two screws at the top that mj12 talked about; it is secured by four crews into the sides of the cabinet it's installed in. There were also very specific instructions about how the water line, drain, and electric had to be routed in order for everything to fit (it's a larger capacity unit with very little room underneath or behind it). Some units are hard wired while others have a cord and plug, so installing an outlet may be necessary. And as noted, some places require an air gap while others do not (I don't have one). Once you figure all that out, installation isn't difficult.


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