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Old 03-07-2008, 09:17 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
Why would the gfi be at fault? its doing its job, the fridge has a current leakage problem.

and if the GFI is bad, it will pop prematurely, making it appears that the fridge is the problem. For a couple bucks, it makes sense to rule it out

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Old 03-07-2008, 09:18 PM   #17
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Worker903, I don't know if you read the article I had posted for you very early on, but the individual who wrote it specifically states that refrigerators should not be plugged into GFCI outlets for very good reasons. One is that the GFCI has been known to trip when the compressor starts up. Ruined food is the other. He even remarks about it being a common mistake with homeowners, especially when the refrifgerator is moved into the garage where the outlets in the garage are normally GFCI protected. Seems to me that if your refrigerator has worked fine all along and that if you moved it with care into the garage, the problem is not with the refrigerator or with the particular GFCI outlet per say. It's a problem systemic to plugging refrigerators in GFCI outlets. Am I missing something here?
You are missing something, the reason the GFI is tripping, you just dont understand how a gfi works and why its tripping, I'm not trying to be rude, but its just out of your realm...
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:21 PM   #18
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and if the GFI is bad, it will pop prematurely, making it appears that the fridge is the problem. For a couple bucks, it makes sense to rule it out
How do you determine a bad gfi? Thats what I want to know... You guys just dont understand how a gfi works...
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:06 PM   #19
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Chris75, I hate to be a party pooper here but the man who wrote the article that I alluded to has some pretty impressive credentials and a wealth of firsthand construction experience over numerous decades, the least of which is home inspection consulting.

You immediately chose to condemn the appliance outright, sight unseen and with no additional information, rather than keep it simple for the time being and possibly even suggest - as did terri_and_jj - that Worker903 consider investing $12 in a new GFCI outlet. I respectfully disagree with your assessment and apparently at least one other poster does as well.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:28 PM   #20
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Chris75, I hate to be a party pooper here but the man who wrote the article that I alluded to has some pretty impressive credentials and a wealth of firsthand construction experience over numerous decades, the least of which is home inspection consulting.

You immediately chose to condemn the appliance outright, sight unseen and with no additional information, rather than keep it simple for the time being and possibly even suggest - as did terri_and_jj - that Worker903 consider investing $12 in a new GFCI outlet. I respectfully disagree with your assessment and apparently at least one other poster does as well.
Do whatever makes you happy...
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Old 03-08-2008, 04:25 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by End Grain View Post
Worker903, I don't know if you read the article I had posted for you very early on, but the individual who wrote it specifically states that refrigerators should not be plugged into GFCI outlets for very good reasons. One is that the GFCI has been known to trip when the compressor starts up. Ruined food is the other. He even remarks about it being a common mistake with homeowners, especially when the refrifgerator is moved into the garage where the outlets in the garage are normally GFCI protected. Seems to me that if your refrigerator has worked fine all along and that if you moved it with care into the garage, the problem is not with the refrigerator or with the particular GFCI outlet per say. It's a problem systemic to plugging refrigerators in GFCI outlets. Am I missing something here?
THANK YOU END GRAIN!! YOU HAVE BEEN VERY HELPFUL AND I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME AND INFORMATION. WORKER 903
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Old 03-08-2008, 04:56 PM   #22
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Chris75, I hate to be a party pooper here but the man who wrote the article that I alluded to has some pretty impressive credentials and a wealth of firsthand construction experience over numerous decades, the least of which is home inspection consulting.

Y
For what its worth the guy that wrote that article is a moron...
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Old 03-10-2008, 05:30 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by End Grain View Post
Worker903, I don't know if you read the article I had posted for you very early on, but the individual who wrote it specifically states that refrigerators should not be plugged into GFCI outlets for very good reasons. One is that the GFCI has been known to trip when the compressor starts up. Ruined food is the other. He even remarks about it being a common mistake with homeowners, especially when the refrifgerator is moved into the garage where the outlets in the garage are normally GFCI protected. Seems to me that if your refrigerator has worked fine all along and that if you moved it with care into the garage, the problem is not with the refrigerator or with the particular GFCI outlet per say. It's a problem systemic to plugging refrigerators in GFCI outlets. Am I missing something here?
Can GFI's be tripped if the fridge pulls more Amps then the circut is rated for or only if there is a short? I don't know how many amps a normal fridge uses, never checked. But if this is true I am now worried about my kegerator as I use it to lager and if it shuts off and temp rises my batch will be ruined. =(


Last edited by Taipans; 03-10-2008 at 05:34 AM.
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