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Amitabh 11-26-2012 02:44 PM

Gas Stove
 
Hello All

Dont know if this is the right forum for it, and if not, please show me the right forum. But, i am looking for a new gas stove. What i really want to know is across each element (be it 4 or 5) how much btu for each is considered optimal or good.

I know, one might say its based on your cooking, but i have always cooked on electric. so i dont know what is considered "good" vs. "average."

I know forsure, that at least 1 element does btu greater than 16k, and i know i will get a 5k btu element, but what about the other 2 or 3? what should they be to be considered a good gas stove production?

thank you

Fairview 11-26-2012 02:49 PM

What were the BTUs of the electrics you've always cooked on?

Amitabh 11-26-2012 02:50 PM

Electric is measured in BTUs? i never knew that.

i thought BTUs only had to do with gas.

Fairview 11-26-2012 03:08 PM

After all those fine home cooked meals without knowing the stove BTUs I doubt it's very important. If the valve wasn't opened far enough dinner may be a little late. Open the valve too far and the skillet smokes. You'll quickly get the change over.

If possible, don't make the mistake we did and buy one that requires electricity to function. Our old range was electric ignition which we liked but when the power was out it could be lit with a match. The new one, not so and very inconvenient.

TheBobmanNH 11-26-2012 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fairview (Post 1060932)
If possible, don't make the mistake we did and buy one that requires electricity to function. Our old range was electric ignition which we liked but when the power was out it could be lit with a match. The new one, not so and very inconvenient.

How would a stove prevent you from lighting it with a match? Does it have some kind of electronic lockout on the gas valve? Interesting.


Quote:

Electric is measured in BTUs? i never knew that.
Everything heat-related is measured in BTU's. Ever see air conditioner ratings?

Amitabh 11-26-2012 03:29 PM

i'd like to know that too. that electric thing sucks, how do i avoid that.

you are right, if i dont know now, what difference does it make. But i will be spending money on something, so i would rather know and understand what i am spending it on. :thumbup:

so, if 17k, 15k, 9k, 5k (random) is considered good, then so be it and i will use that as a benchmark or reference point when shopping.

Thank you,

Fairview 11-26-2012 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amitabh (Post 1060946)
i'd like to know that too. that electric thing sucks, how do i avoid that.

you are right, if i dont know now, what difference does it make. But i will be spending money on something, so i would rather know and understand what i am spending it on. :thumbup:

so, if 17k, 15k, 9k, 5k (random) is considered good, then so be it and i will use that as a benchmark or reference point when shopping.

Thank you,

You avoid that electric thing that sucks by doing just what you are doing now. Research. I failed to go far enough in that endeavor and I'm glad I could make you aware of that. That information isn't very available on line and possibly not with direct hands on sales. Here is hoping some with spark ignition are still available to match light during power failure.

user1007 11-26-2012 08:45 PM

Building and fire codes, and perhaps your insurance company, probably set limits on how much output a residential range may have without enhancing firewalls, etc.

Remember you need an appropriately matched range hood to the BTU output of the stove too! Will you have room for it without tearing your kitchen apart? Able to vent it through existing flue to the roof?

Here is a piece on stove BTU consideration that may help?

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-a-btu...y-shoul-112070

hardwareman 11-26-2012 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheBobmanNH (Post 1060934)
How would a stove prevent you from lighting it with a match? Does it have some kind of electronic lockout on the gas valve? Interesting.

top burners can always be lit with a match, the oven however is a different story. Almost all ovens today use an electronic ignition or ignitor to light the oven. When you turn your oven on the bake ignitor will glow red hot, as the ignitor gets hotter it draws more amperage through the gas valve. When the ignitor draws 4.2 amps the gas valve will open up. Therefore if you have no power to your oven you have no gas supply through your valve.

hardwareman 11-26-2012 10:22 PM

electric stoves are not rated in btus, they are rated in watts.

Fairview 11-27-2012 06:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hardwareman (Post 1061345)
top burners can always be lit with a match, the oven however is a different story. Almost all ovens today use an electronic ignition or ignitor to light the oven. When you turn your oven on the bake ignitor will glow red hot, as the ignitor gets hotter it draws more amperage through the gas valve. When the ignitor draws 4.2 amps the gas valve will open up. Therefore if you have no power to your oven you have no gas supply through your valve.

If you want a free education come light mine.

carpdad 12-01-2012 07:03 AM

Most gas ranges I've seen had 1/2" supply connections. Some ranges with high btu burners require 3/4" supply.

Fairview 01-01-2013 04:10 PM

[quote=TheBobmanNH;1060934]How would a stove prevent you from lighting it with a match? Does it have some kind of electronic lockout on the gas valve? Interesting.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Yes, it pertains to those that have ( automatic ) lockout in case of power failure. Those without that feature aren't affected.

fa_f3_20 01-01-2013 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amitabh (Post 1060921)
Electric is measured in BTUs? i never knew that.

i thought BTUs only had to do with gas.

Watts and BTU/hr are both rates of energy production or consumption. 1 watt roughly equals 3.4 BTU/hr.


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