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Old 06-11-2010, 11:38 AM   #31
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Freezer tripping GFCI


I am no expert, though I have dabbled in home repair projects from time to time. I seem to feel that there is a common sense middle ground.

First of all, I do believe that there is a real danger that can be caused from large appliances with ground faults. So I agree that simply changing out a gfi with a standard receptacle may be an issue IF the problem is a ground fault.

However, the other side (pro GFI) states that a ground fault MUST be the problem and so it is NEVER OK to switch out the outlets. If this is the case, if the ONLY reason GFI's trip is because of a malfunction in the appliance plugged into them, then why aren't they required code for THROUGHOUT the home? I know from experience that if you plug a vacuum into a GFI it may trip.

So taking into consideration both sides, wouldn't the best course of action be to check out the fridge or freezer to make sure it isn't "live"? Then if it checks out, it would be safe to plug into a standard receptacle?

This seems like a logical and safe solution to me? If this is a good way to proceed, then my question would be how do you check out the fridge or freezer to see if it had a ground fault?

Thanks!

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Old 06-11-2010, 11:20 PM   #32
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Freezer tripping GFCI


Seems to me I read that some refrigerators would bleed voltage during the defrost cycle causing a ground fault to trip.
If the ground fault trips while your on vacation for 2 weeks you'll come home to a real mess. That's the biggest reason to keep them off of ground faults
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Old 06-12-2010, 07:23 AM   #33
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Freezer tripping GFCI


SV9779, I think that makes perfect sense.
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Old 06-14-2010, 11:12 AM   #34
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Freezer tripping GFCI


This happened 2 years ago, but relevant to this thread.
My refrigerator fan was fried in a brown out. I ordered a service replacement part. Compare the 2 sitting on the table they look different but the service was guaranteed to perform same as OE part.
OE is LH part (went bad), service is RH part.


Upon re-installation in the freezer section (fan is in freezer, it blows cold air into the fridge portion), I noticed the service part has exposed 120 VAC plugs just above the coils. The OE part used a more expensive sealed connection system. Is there a difference? Under 99% of time, no. However when there is another failure in the fridge system and ice forms on those coils a short to ice could exists and possible electrocution could happen. I filed a claim for this as data point to CPSP.
GFCI would catch this.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:07 PM   #35
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Freezer tripping GFCI


To GFI or Not To GFI.....that is my question. After reading the posts (dating back to 2007, I might add), I'm still a bit confused. We have a freezer in the garage that is closest to a GFI outlet...but not close enough. We currently have a 1150 Joulies, 15A/125W surge protector plugged into the GFI and the freezer plugged into the surge protector. This was the best solution that the guy at Lowes could come up with (outside of hiring an electrician to install a new non-GFI outlet next to the freezer). I'd like to know my risks, if any, and if anyone can offer up a better solution. PLEASE give it to me at about a Kindergarten level......
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:54 PM   #36
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Freezer tripping GFCI


no fridge / freezer should be ran on a gfi, they trip them from time to time and the biggest risk is just your food going bad.
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Old 07-29-2010, 07:15 PM   #37
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Freezer tripping GFCI


Thank you, Racebum. That helps. I'm ok if that's the worst risk I'm taking...as I am in the freezer at least once a day and we're in and out of the garage. I was more concerned about frying the freezer (literally), frying myself, or frying the electrical system in my walls. So, if spoiled food is the only issue....we're good.
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Old 10-15-2010, 09:43 AM   #38
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Freezer tripping GFCI


The issue below is exactly what has happened to my freezer. We defrosted it and now when we plug it in it trips the GFI..It is about 14 years old kennmore. What can I do to resove this issue. It has worked with no problem up to the defrost ..

"And by the way the nuisance tripping by refrigerators and freezers normally occurs during their defrost cycles and is the result of poor motor insulation allowing capacitive current leakage to the frame of the unit. Very typical in older units."
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Old 10-15-2010, 10:56 AM   #39
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Freezer tripping GFCI


plug it into a non gfci outlet. I have an older freezer that I ran a non gfci circuit / outlet for
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Old 10-15-2010, 03:34 PM   #40
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Freezer tripping GFCI


Most houses already have the fridge outlet on the same circuit as the one serving kitchen counters. Don't they have to be GFCI'd by code?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dontkd View Post
The issue below is exactly what has happened to my freezer. We defrosted it and now when we plug it in it trips the GFI..It is about 14 years old kennmore. What can I do to resove this issue. It has worked with no problem up to the defrost ..

"And by the way the nuisance tripping by refrigerators and freezers normally occurs during their defrost cycles and is the result of poor motor insulation allowing capacitive current leakage to the frame of the unit. Very typical in older units."
Then, it would appear that water got into power carrying wires, then leaking into ground through wet insulation. If you were to plug that thing into a non-grounded outlet, you will get shocked when you touch it. If it's not the inductive kick from compressor turning on/off occasionally tripping, you've got a legitimate leak. Unplug the thing.

Take DMM and measure the reasistance between the case/ground prong and the hot. It should be close to infinity.

Last edited by HVAC_NW; 10-15-2010 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 10-15-2010, 10:38 PM   #41
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Freezer tripping GFCI


some appliances will cause a gfci to trip. A small arc at the fan will trip these. Had a fart fan that used a wire off gfci. When the fan was turned off it would trip the gfci. I ran a new wire & haven't had any problems
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Old 06-05-2014, 12:41 PM   #42
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Freezer tripping GFCI


My friend recently moved and had to put his freezer in the garage at the new location (no other option). The garage outlets are gfci protected as the State electrical code requires. His freezer ran fine for a day then tripped the gfci. He asked me for help--here is what I found: The freezer ran fine until the timer turned on the defrost heater (which it does for each 12 hours of compressor run time). I removed the panel covering components inside the freezer to expose the defroster heater and removed it. This heater was a calrod type unit. Resistance readings revealed: end to end resistance within specifications. BUT measuring inside conductor to outside metal revealed a 50k ohm reading. Quick calculation told me that the leak current would be in the 25 milliamp range (more than enough to trip the gfci). A new heating element with infinite resistance (inside to outside metal) fixed the problem. My theory is that internal insulation can deterioate over time (numerous on-off cycles) or moisture might invade some heaters as seals fail on the defrost heaters causing a similar ground fault which trips the gfci.
You might disconnect the supply wire to the defroster temporarily to verify a defroster ground fault if you have similar problems.

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