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-   -   What's the difference between cast iron and chromoly steel flywheels? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f46/whats-difference-between-cast-iron-chromoly-steel-flywheels-178003/)

amodoko 04-24-2013 03:13 PM

What's the difference between cast iron and chromoly steel flywheels?
 
Hi, I have a question regarding flywheels. I have a 2000 Toyota Celica GT-S that is completely stock (I drive it fast only a few times a year). For my car, can someone please tell me what the benefits/drawbacks are to a cast iron flywheel vs a chromoly steel flywheel?

The cast iron flywheel is specifically manufactured using GG25 cast iron. The US equivalent is ASTM A48 Class 35.

I plan to have my car for over another decade (it has low miles), so if someone can tell me which type of metal flywheel is better and why, I would appreciate it. I don't know too much about cars yet, still learning. Thanks

Deja-vue 04-24-2013 08:06 PM

Unless you take the Car to a Race-Track, running it at high RPM,s, just leave it alone.
Billet Steel Flywheels are lighter, balanced for higher RPM and Torque.
Spend your Money elsewhere, it is not worth it IMHO.
Cheers,
:wink:

ukrkoz 04-24-2013 11:08 PM

amodoko, what is the difference between cast iron and chrome/molybdenum alloy? Same as between sheet metal and aluminum body. Same as between aluminum and carbon fiber ones. But it was rightfully mentioned. Why? Oh, sorry, to lighten your wallet for substantial amount. Oh yes.

amodoko 04-25-2013 12:31 AM

The reason I'm asking is because I can either get my stock flywheel, which is chromoly steel, resurfaced... or I can just get a new cast iron one for about the same cost as a resurfacing job. Didn't know which route to go. Getting the cast iron one would be less hassle since it would get shipped to me and I wouldn't have to take the stock flywheel to the machine shop for resurfacing, and it would be a bit cheaper. But I will just stick with the stock chromoly steel flywheel probably. I was just worried the shop would resurface it poorly since I believe my flywheel is a 2 step flywheel.

But no one has technical information about the differences between the two metals? I heard that cast iron is more abrasive on the clutch and runs hotter while chromoly will skim coat a bit more.

amodoko 04-25-2013 12:38 AM

And which one would you pick... $55 to resurface the stock chromoly steel flywheel or $30 to get a cast iron one shipped to my door. Both super cheap, no idea about the machine shop's reputation but also don't want to put in the cast iron one if it will give me issues with gas mileage, rusting, wearing out the clutch faster, etc.

Seattle2k 04-29-2013 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amodoko (Post 1166726)
And which one would you pick... $55 to resurface the stock chromoly steel flywheel or $30 to get a cast iron one shipped to my door. Both super cheap, no idea about the machine shop's reputation but also don't want to put in the cast iron one if it will give me issues with gas mileage, rusting, wearing out the clutch faster, etc.

Many times, OEM is the more-reliable way to go. Just sayin.

r0ckstarr 04-30-2013 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seattle2k (Post 1169599)
Many times, OEM is the more-reliable way to go. Just sayin.

Exactly. If Toyota designed the car for something else, they would have put it in there from the factory. Stick with what the car came with, especially if you plan to keep it for another 10 years.

Quote:

First, it is important to understand that steel is an alloy, or mixture of different metals with the base metal being iron.

Hi tensile steel is a good steel and nearly bulletproof. It is considered an opened grain metal and as such the tubing wall has to be thicker to maintain strength.

Chrome Molybdneum steel includes iron, chromium, molybdneum in the mix allowing it to be a close grained metal. This allows having a thinner wall and still be strong.

HOWEVER, both Hi tensile steel and CrMo steel weigh the same. The difference is that since CrMo is stronger you need less material. Less material=less weight. If you are talking about BMX, CrMo is hardly ever used to reduce weight, instead it is used for higher strength so most Hi Tensile and CrMo frames weigh the same.

The main disadvantage of CrMo it its cost. Since the world supply of molybdneum is almost exhausted the cost of CrMo is nearly 4 times higher than that of Hi Tensile.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...2165543AAKjCZK

jproffer 05-02-2013 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by amodoko (Post 1166726)
And which one would you pick... $55 to resurface the stock chromoly steel flywheel or $30 to get a cast iron one shipped to my door. Both super cheap, no idea about the machine shop's reputation but also don't want to put in the cast iron one if it will give me issues with gas mileage, rusting, wearing out the clutch faster, etc.

As a former machinist, I wouldn't let someone do it who quoted me $55 unless they could tell me exactly what was involved in the machining process.

$55 isn't even enough to set it up, much less cutting time.

Windows on Wash 05-27-2013 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jproffer (Post 1171292)
As a former machinist, I wouldn't let someone do it who quoted me $55 unless they could tell me exactly what was involved in the machining process.

$55 isn't even enough to set it up, much less cutting time.

$55 is cheap but not out of the range of what we used to charge.

Ever have a stone let go while you are on the machine....that fun... :eek:

caveeagle 07-22-2013 04:19 PM

On your car, you probably wont notice the difference. You have some risk getting your original resurfaced. If your old clutch is slipping, you can have heat cracks that usually go deeper into the metal than a resurface job can correct. Look closely for small honey-comb, or '~' shaped cracks. These WILL cause clutch chatter. I have seen this numerous times on old Fords as well as my sister in-law's Honda.

You also have to consider your gas and travel cost, unless you have a machine shop that falls on your way to work. For me, It would have been another $30 in gas and tolls for the closest machine shop that would/could do the job. I found a good deal on a new replacement for both Saturns that I built for my kids.


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