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Old 09-23-2011, 08:22 PM   #1
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Tire mounting


Does a car tire have a side? I'm mounting my winter tires on steel rims. I'm just wondering if there's a side that the tire should be mounted on or it doesn't matter?

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Old 09-23-2011, 08:49 PM   #2
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it depends on tire. if it says "unidirectional" or there's an arrow pointing in a particular direction, then yes, that's the only way to mount it. Aquatrads used to be that way.

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Old 09-23-2011, 08:55 PM   #3
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Nothing particular. Both sides have the same writings except one side seems to have a bar code engraved.
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Old 09-23-2011, 08:57 PM   #4
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unless you really have direction specific trad pattern - does not matter. sidewalls are identical thickness either side. some folks do white wall or blue wall out, for cosmetics.
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Old 09-23-2011, 09:02 PM   #5
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Tire mounting


Ok thanks. Now the next question.... setting the bead with ether??? Good or bad idea?
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Old 09-24-2011, 07:37 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
it depends on tire. if it says "unidirectional" or there's an arrow pointing in a particular direction, then yes, that's the only way to mount it. Aquatrads used to be that way.

This is incorrect. Majority of rotational direction tires can and need to be mounted both ways. Two for the left side of the car and two for the right side of the car so the arrows all roll towards the front of the vehicle. Other tires will say "mount this side out" and this is for vehicle handling purposes. If it says nothing, like you said your tires are, then it dosen't matter however I would mount either all bar codes up or down.
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Old 09-24-2011, 09:12 AM   #7
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Tire mounting


Sounds as if you are trying to mount these tires yourself. "Setting the bead with ether" is NOT a good idea. Experienced tire mounting people will tell you that this is a "hit or miss" type thing: You will either be hit or missed by something airborne if you use this method.
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Old 09-24-2011, 09:20 AM   #8
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I mounted one so far. Took me an hour. Lots of soap, crowbar and a few flat heads. What a PITA. I tried with WD40 and didn't work so I used my compressor. I heard the "pop" so I guess the bead is set. I'm gonna try the ratchet strap trick on the next one.
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Old 09-24-2011, 06:30 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by D-rock View Post
This is incorrect. Majority of rotational direction tires can and need to be mounted both ways. Two for the left side of the car and two for the right side of the car so the arrows all roll towards the front of the vehicle. Other tires will say "mount this side out" and this is for vehicle handling purposes. If it says nothing, like you said your tires are, then it dosen't matter however I would mount either all bar codes up or down.

well, if you really want to go really technical:

Car manufacturers will recommend tire rotation frequency and pattern. Depending on the specifics of the vehicle, tire rotation may be recommended every 12,000 km (8,000 mi). The rotation pattern is typically moving the back wheels to the front, and the front to the back, but crossing them when moving to the back. If the tires are unidirectional, the rotation can only be rotated front to back on the same side of the vehicle to preserve the rotational direction of the tires. Most unidirectional tires can be moved from side to side if they are remounted; tires with asymmetric rims are a rare exception. More complex rotation patterns are required if the vehicle has a full-size spare tire that is part of the rotation, or if there are snow tires.
To clarify; the pattern for asymmetrical tires to be rotated, or positioned, is for the tires on the driving axle of two-wheel drive vehicles to remain on the same side of the vehicle as they are moved to the non-driving axle, and for the tires on the non-driving axle to cross over to the opposite side of the vehicle as they are placed onto the driving axle. For all-wheel drive (AWD) vehicles and four-wheel drive (4WD) vehicles, it is recommended that the tires from each axle cross over as the fronts move to the rear and rears to the front. For the 4WD configuration, it is dependent upon how much 4WD driving is actually performed, whether it's controlled via mechanical/computerized devices or in vehicle controls, the recommendation will likely be found in the Owner/Operator manual or can be obtained by speaking to the manufacturer or dealership.
Current thinking stresses the desirability of keeping the best tires on the rear wheels of the vehicle, whether it is front, or rear wheel drive. The reason for this is that if the rear wheels lose grip before the front ones, an oversteer condition will occur, which is harder to control than the corresponding understeer which will happen if a front wheel is lost. This is also the case if a tire blows out, so the intuitive belief that the front steering/driving tires need to be the best quality is not actually the case.
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Old 09-24-2011, 06:47 PM   #10
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If you happen to have a newer Corvette, I think there are 4 different tires because the different sizes from front to rear and directional rotation.

Dick

Last edited by concretemasonry; 09-24-2011 at 08:41 PM.
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Old 09-24-2011, 06:50 PM   #11
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yes, BMWs have some odd tires, Nissan 300 has wider rear and narrower front, Porsches are same. many cars have 2 prs of tires that can not be rotated back to front. His question was - does a tire have a side he should be worried about mounting it? no, if it's a regular tire with uniform symmetrical pattern. now we have all the scientific discussion....
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Old 09-24-2011, 07:27 PM   #12
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Tire mounting


I have a Protege 1998. Nothing fancy here. Now I'm debating if I should just get those tires put on rims by a garage. I tried another one earlier and I just can't mount it!!!!
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:56 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Audiotekm View Post
I mounted one so far. Took me an hour. Lots of soap, crowbar and a few flat heads. What a PITA. I tried with WD40 and didn't work so I used my compressor. I heard the "pop" so I guess the bead is set. I'm gonna try the ratchet strap trick on the next one.
WD-40 and rubber is a bad mix. It makes rubber swell and go soft.
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Old 09-28-2011, 09:49 AM   #14
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Tire mounting


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I have a Protege 1998. Nothing fancy here. Now I'm debating if I should just get those tires put on rims by a garage. I tried another one earlier and I just can't mount it!!!!
I've done both - mounted them myself, and had somebody do it.

I will never again go through the hassle of doing it myself. Tires with tubes are easy. Tubeless tires are a whole different story.
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Old 09-28-2011, 10:23 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by polarzak View Post
WD-40 and rubber is a bad mix. It makes rubber swell and go soft.
Yep. WD 40 was never made to be a lubricant.

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