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-   -   oxygen sensor replacement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f46/oxygen-sensor-replacement-94842/)

phantasm72 02-07-2011 10:23 PM

oxygen sensor replacement
 
Just curious to know how difficult it is to change a downstream oxygen sensor. Its for a 2001 Neon.
I am assuming it is located somewhere along the exhaust (after the catalytic converter and before the muffler??).
Is it just a matter of locating it, using a wrench to get it out, and unhooking a few wires?
Any pitfalls or anything that needs to be looked out for?

ukrkoz 02-08-2011 09:31 PM

1. O2 socket is required
2. quick wrench or PB BLaster or equivalent is required; it will be rusted in.
3. O2 sensors are ready available for most cars. pre-shop for it in a local store; maybe even place one on hold; have yours removed, drive backand MAKE SURE it's the same one. can't tell you how many time i had one bought ahead of time, just to drive back to have it replaced because plug won't fit or harness is too short.
4. personally, i stay away from Bosch products.

phantasm72 02-09-2011 11:19 AM

Cheers for that.
So I take it it is not a problem to drive with an O2 sensor removed then?
What about california emmisons? I have been asked that quite a few times phoning around for a price. I assumed I dont have that, since my car isnt in, or ever was purchased/owned in california. How do you know for sure if you car is kitted one way or another, and does it really matter if you stick the other O2 sensor in?

ukrkoz 02-09-2011 10:45 PM

oops.. :eek:sorry, my bad. :no:YOU DO NOT DRIVE WITH SENSOR REMOVED. :no:you can't really drive with a big hole in your exhaust pipe.

sorry, my bad. we always have a spare car, so i simply drive one to a store while one in repairs is sitting waiting for goodness to happen. glad you asked.

Know It ALL 02-09-2011 11:21 PM

TIP: It should be easier to remove when it's HOT. No torch required. LOL

Thurman 02-13-2011 09:01 AM

I work at a locally owned auto parts store part-time and one thing I see very often: Someone comes in, buys an O2 sensor, comes back in about an hour with the threads all crossed up wanting to exchange it----NOT! Starting the threads on an O2 sensor is really not that hard, but they can be cross-threaded very easily. Yes, removing them while hot/warm makes life better. Also--DO NOT attempt to put any type of lubricant like "Never-Seeze" or "Teflon pasted products" on the threads of the O2 sensor. This will almost always get on the sensor itself and render it useless. Apply a little oil with your fingertip ONLY on the threads if anything. Most new O2 sensors come with a lubricant made on the threads now. One customer recently had crossed-threaded his new O2 sensor and wanted a threading die to straighten out the threads. Sure, I looked one up and told him that for $94 I could get him an 18 mm x 1.5mm die, he was not happy. Then I sold him a small "knife" file, showed him how to file the threads carefully to straighten them out enough to use the O2 sensor. He came back in the next day smiling--it worked. Another problem IS the wiring pigtail, some have two wire, some three, some four, and some five wires. Some of the larger "name brand" parts stores look these up in the 'puter, get the part and have no idea of what they have just sold. Check your wiring harness/plug before going to buy yours.

phantasm72 02-13-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thurman (Post 590118)
I work at a locally owned auto parts store part-time and one thing I see very often: Someone comes in, buys an O2 sensor, comes back in about an hour with the threads all crossed up wanting to exchange it----NOT! Starting the threads on an O2 sensor is really not that hard, but they can be cross-threaded very easily. Yes, removing them while hot/warm makes life better. Also--DO NOT attempt to put any type of lubricant like "Never-Seeze" or "Teflon pasted products" on the threads of the O2 sensor. This will almost always get on the sensor itself and render it useless. Apply a little oil with your fingertip ONLY on the threads if anything. Most new O2 sensors come with a lubricant made on the threads now. One customer recently had crossed-threaded his new O2 sensor and wanted a threading die to straighten out the threads. Sure, I looked one up and told him that for $94 I could get him an 18 mm x 1.5mm die, he was not happy. Then I sold him a small "knife" file, showed him how to file the threads carefully to straighten them out enough to use the O2 sensor. He came back in the next day smiling--it worked. Another problem IS the wiring pigtail, some have two wire, some three, some four, and some five wires. Some of the larger "name brand" parts stores look these up in the 'puter, get the part and have no idea of what they have just sold. Check your wiring harness/plug before going to buy yours.

Thanks for that. Something I noticed from calling around, most just asked for the year and type of car, then they rattled of a price for the appopriate O2 sensor, but I had a couple of places ask me for the 8th digit of my VIN number.
Does that actually give you a more accurate information on the exact sensor needed?

beerdog 02-14-2011 08:00 PM

Get on the internet and do a little research. Try RockAuto.com. It is real hard to beat their pricing. They will many tomes multiple brands from the cheapest garbage to OEM. Once you have a part number you can shop arround. Don't hesitate to try Amazon.

Thurman 02-15-2011 08:40 PM

ANY parts counter person who asks for the VIN number or at least the eighth digit knows what they are doing IMO. The reasoning for this is simple: At times there are engineering changes put into place as the vehicles go down the line. Knowing exactly what motor you have in your vehicle and sometimes the sequential build number will tell if there was a "rolling engineering" change on a vehicle. The O2 sensor put into the engine of the vehicle built just before yours may not be the one you got in your motor. Some O2 sensors have a built in heater, therefore the extra wire or two wires for this. I'm still a fan of trying to find an independent auto parts store where the counter guys actually work on vehicles, even if they are their own. Most likely they help the "hot-rod" guys in town and know a lot of tricks also.


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