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Old 06-26-2011, 06:11 PM   #16
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Hand washing vs Touchless


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What color paint is on your rags when you are done waxing
Microfiber rags used. A bit of dirt, nothing major.

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Old 06-26-2011, 10:35 PM   #17
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Hand washing vs Touchless


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I understand that part. But oxidation can't happen if you wax consistently. Touchless or not.
There is oxidation on the paint the day you bring it home from the dealer. Claybar a brand-new car and you'll be able to tell how bad "brand new" paint is already.

Applying wax over a touchless-car-wash job is only going to seal grime into the paint. You want a nice deep cleaning before you put on wax. The spray-on, wipe-off stuff does little for protection. It may give you some shine and make water bead up, but it's not going to do much for paint longevity.

A touchless wash is fine for between washes, or in the winter to blast some of the salt off the car, but the car is not going to be "clean." Waxing without having a good deep clean is only going to smear around particles with your rag that can/will scratch the paint.

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Old 06-27-2011, 12:03 AM   #18
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Hand washing vs Touchless


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There is oxidation on the paint the day you bring it home from the dealer. Claybar a brand-new car and you'll be able to tell how bad "brand new" paint is already.

Applying wax over a touchless-car-wash job is only going to seal grime into the paint. You want a nice deep cleaning before you put on wax. The spray-on, wipe-off stuff does little for protection. It may give you some shine and make water bead up, but it's not going to do much for paint longevity.

A touchless wash is fine for between washes, or in the winter to blast some of the salt off the car, but the car is not going to be "clean." Waxing without having a good deep clean is only going to smear around particles with your rag that can/will scratch the paint.
I hear you. But not washing it at all is even worse.
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Old 06-29-2011, 06:52 AM   #19
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Hand washing vs Touchless


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I hear you. But not washing it at all is even worse.
I never wash my car in the winter. It is black, but with a wonderful white coating of road salt all winter long. I was told many years ago by a GM rep that washing a car in the winter (where salt is used) is one of the worst things one can do. Dry salt is not corrosive, and when you wash it, you send salt water deep into the seams. Salt water is very corrosive.

All that said, I have a four year old black GM. It is in showroom condition. It is clayed spring and fall a year, polished and waxed regularly in the summer.
I would never take it to a touchless. Use the two bucket method when you wash, with a good car soap, and a real sheep skin wash mitt. Start at top, be gentle and you will never get a swirl or scratch. Washing your own car by hand is like making woopie with a beautiful woman.
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Old 06-29-2011, 09:17 AM   #20
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Hand washing vs Touchless


The best way to minimize scratching is to first do a gentle hand wash, changing the cloth frequently. This is to get rid of most of the coarse dust and dirt.

Then you need to do another wash to get off the oxidation.

Gee I wish there was a wax or coating that lasted more than a week.

What do you mean by claying? Buffing? Buffing takes off paint. After a finite number of times you wear right throuhg the paint and the undercoat becomes visible here and there particularly on convex corners.
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Old 06-29-2011, 09:56 AM   #21
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Hand washing vs Touchless


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What do you mean by claying?
He's talking about using claybar to remove all the tiny little ground in particles. Google 'claybar car'. You rub your car with clay (made specifically for this purpose) to remove surface contaminations.
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Old 06-29-2011, 11:18 AM   #22
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Claybar is to automotive detailing, what a hammer is to a carpenter. Removes everything, doesn't hurt the paint (unless you are wreckless/careless) and gives you a smooth, even surface to apply compounds, polishes, glazes, and waxes.
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Old 06-29-2011, 01:02 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by polarzak
I never wash my car in the winter. It is black, but with a wonderful white coating of road salt all winter long. I was told many years ago by a GM rep that washing a car in the winter (where salt is used) is one of the worst things one can do. Dry salt is not corrosive, and when you wash it, you send salt water deep into the seams. Salt water is very corrosive.

All that said, I have a four year old black GM. It is in showroom condition. It is clayed spring and fall a year, polished and waxed regularly in the summer.
I would never take it to a touchless. Use the two bucket method when you wash, with a good car soap, and a real sheep skin wash mitt. Start at top, be gentle and you will never get a swirl or scratch. Washing your own car by hand is like making woopie with a beautiful woman.
Great info
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Old 06-30-2011, 07:00 AM   #24
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Hand washing vs Touchless


dinosaur1...just wanted to add a couple of things. While I never wash my cars in the winter, I to get them oil sprayed every fall. Also, check out the Mequiiars wax forums http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/index.php
Lots of great information, tips, tricks, to keeping your vehicle gleaming and blemish free.
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Old 06-30-2011, 08:33 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by polarzak
dinosaur1...just wanted to add a couple of things. While I never wash my cars in the winter, I to get them oil sprayed every fall. Also, check out the Mequiiars wax forums http://www.meguiarsonline.com/forums/index.php
Lots of great information, tips, tricks, to keeping your vehicle gleaming and blemish free.
Thanks

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