General And Specific Questions On Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS - Automotive Repairs - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


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Old 02-16-2013, 09:06 PM   #16
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Yeah, bleed it then replace all of it, then bleed it again, then do your clutch. As for anyone that disagree with turning the flywheel. Your options are replace or re use. I found one for your car for 40 bucks, plus @15 to ship. Will be more than that to turn.

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Old 02-17-2013, 12:13 PM   #17
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


You're right, the aftermarket flywheels for my car are very inexpensive, especially on ebay. I had looked at those, but considered getting the flywheel resurfaced for $50 due to the fact that the OEM flywheel I have is supposedly much heavier than almost all the aftermarket ones, and I don't want to change the way the car revs (flywheel weight affects the way a car revs and holds power, etc). Honestly, it probably wouldn't make a difference but I'm just being picky. I will probably end up buying an aftermarket one if I ever have to do the clutch a second time if I still own the car, rather than getting it resurfaced a second time.

And urkoz, hope you weren't offended at all. I just enjoy learning about stuff/asking questions/etc. I do a ton of research on this stuff. I'm obsessed with the science and mechanics of things in general (never really got a chance to work on stuff when I was younger), so for me, learning about it is the majority of the fun for me. So although I could have already bled the clutch, I just enjoy learning about the mechanics and functional aspects too much to just skip over to the physical work. I find myself spending a great deal of time just reading about stuff because it's so fun for me.

I will probably bleed the clutch (as well as adjust clutch pedal free play) first due to the fact that it is so simple compared to tearing the car apart. But from the research I've done, it doesn't make theoretical sense that it will help at all, since air in the clutch lines would cause issues disengaging and not engaging. Even in the troubleshooting section of my service manual, it lists a bunch of causes for the clutch to slip and it does not mention the clutch lines at all or that bleeding the lines would beneficial... but regardless, sometimes things work due to an unaccounted variable so I'll probably bleed the lines anyways since it is easy to do. The only thing the manual lists that you can do without tearing the car apart is adjust clutch pedal free play.

Anyways, thanks again for everyone's help

Last edited by amodoko; 02-17-2013 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:13 PM   #18
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Did you ever pull a flywheel? Fun Fun Fun. That pic you posted, did you notice one of the bolts was snapped off. Not to take anything away from you as a mechanic, do not touch that flywheel, or rear main seal. The less you disturb the better chance you have of NON- failure. I remember mechanics was fun. What is even more fun is buying an inexpensive car and doing no work to it, putting no money into it, beating the crap out of it and knowing when to sell it before it starts the nickel and dime process. I buy most of my cars at scrap value, then 6 months to a year just junk them. I have done absolutely nothing to my current car except clean the dizzy cap, it has been over two years. I just bought another car and it is getting the blue devil, if that does not reseal the intake gasket, I will just junk it and make a few hundred dollars on the whole deal. After having the craigslist crowd nickel and dime me on the selling price.
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:16 AM   #19
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Yes, I noticed the broken off bolt. That is not my rear main seal, just a picture of what it would look like when I get to that point in the repair. The pictures I posted were from another website where the guy had used an aftermarket flywheel bolt that broke off.

And no offense taken... I am not a mechanic, ha, just trying to learn on things when they need repairing. But I am going to at least try to take off the flywheel this time... haven't decided about the rear main seal 100% though. Even if I do mess something up, even if it is an expensive mistake, at least I'll learn a bit more had I not tried. And the knowledge I gain from those mistakes may even pay me back in the future since I won't have to pay someone to do repairs on my car, etc.

That sounds like a great system you have where you don't really have to spend money on your car. I used to work on motorcycles/scooters where I would usually buy them when they were not running (since I enjoy tinkering with things) and then fix them up, drive them around for a summer, and then sell them for a profit. It wasn't a ton of cash, but it was fun to do. I've just never done anything like that with cars, since I'm still driving the first car I've ever owned. Wish I didn't have to teach all my family members, cousins, and a few friends how to drive a stick on it though... otherwise the clutch would not have burned up so quick.

Yeah, craigslist can be hit or miss. Sometimes you'll get a bunch of tire kickers, and other times you'll get someone that understands the value of what you got. Once priced an old motorcycle on craigslist for $700, had one guy come out and analyze everything and said he'd offer me $200 max (even after I listed everything about the bike in detail prior to him coming down) which I declined of course. The very next day, a guy came by and bought it right way for $700 and was just glad it hadn't sold yet.

I've never junked a car before, I will have to try that out some time. Seems like scrap metal prices are pretty high right now as well.

Last edited by amodoko; 02-18-2013 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:29 PM   #20
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Did you find a write up on any of the forums? I do write ups a lot so i can remember how I did things later on. Pictures and diagrams can help you get the car back together without to many let over parts. I believe those flywheel bolts are locktighted on, probably need heat. I take out the number one spark plug and put a extension down the hole to hold the engine while I break the bolts with a cheater bar. Better if you hold the crankshaft bolt. I would hope you have a big compressor and air ratchet. Oh, and change that tranny fluid. I would use a torque wrench on the drain plug bolt, and make sure the fill plug comes loose before the drain plug. Check what fluid you need.
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Old 02-18-2013, 11:30 PM   #21
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


That's all really good advice. The bolts are basically locktighted on (they come from the factory with some type of dry adhesive imbedded in the threads prior to installation). I was planning on just putting a screwdriver in the gears of the flywheel so it won't rotate while I unbolt the bolts. And I'm definitely changing the trans fluid (although the recommended brand and weight is $15 a bottle, and I'll need 3, ha, but well worth it anyways). I was able to find some write-ups online that should end up being very helpful.
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Old 02-19-2013, 08:55 AM   #22
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Quote:
Originally Posted by paintdrying View Post
Did you find a write up on any of the forums? I do write ups a lot so i can remember how I did things later on. Pictures and diagrams can help you get the car back together without to many let over parts. I believe those flywheel bolts are locktighted on, probably need heat. I take out the number one spark plug and put a extension down the hole to hold the engine while I break the bolts with a cheater bar. Better if you hold the crankshaft bolt. I would hope you have a big compressor and air ratchet. Oh, and change that tranny fluid. I would use a torque wrench on the drain plug bolt, and make sure the fill plug comes loose before the drain plug. Check what fluid you need.
Ayuh,.... Stuffin' a length of Rope into the cylinder is the accepted way of doin' that,...

Lots less chance of doin' Damage to the piston or head...
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Old 02-19-2013, 11:41 AM   #23
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


I would never put anything through the spark plug holes. Far too much risk of damage, especially if you don't roll the engine to assure the valves are closed. Depending what you wedge in there you could also damage the cylinder walls, piston or even the plug threads in the head. Once you get the flywheel exposed holding it is not really difficult. You can put a couple of the pressure plate bolts back into the flywheel holes on opposing sides and use a pry bar long enough to give you the leverage. I just use my pneumatic impact and buzz them right out with no need to even hold the flywheel.

If you are going to do the job then replace the clutch disk, replace the pressure plate and surface the flywheel. This is not the time to save a buck, spend the money and do it right. Like the old saying goes, if you can't afford to do it right, can you afford to do it twice! I have removed hundreds of flywheels over the years and can't remember ever breaking a bolt.

I usually replace the clutch release bearing and the pilot bearing/bushing while I am in there too. You have done a substantial amount of work to take it apart and put it back together, you want to make it work right. Your pressure plate has a wear surface just like the surface of the flywheel and the heat from a slipping clutch can overheat the springs causing them to weaken and heat can warp the pressure plate preventing smooth and even application of the clutch. Having the proper finish on your new or resurfaced parts is vital, that surface is what helps the clutch disk to wear in properly without glazing.

Prior to assembly always clean the mating surface of your flywheel and pressure plate well with a solvent like brakleen so that it is free of contaminants, just the metal parts not the clutch disk. Oil, grease or cosmoline (rust preventative) can burn on and cause glazing on your new clutch making it slip, grab or even fail prematurely.

Use an alignment tool to hold the clutch disk centered while you evenly tighten the pressure plate. You can eyeball it but an alignment tool will assure it is right and make mating the engine and trans back together much easier. Parts stores can usually get you a plastic alignment tool that looks identical to the input shaft of your transmission. You can use a universal cone type tool, it works but I find its always better having the splined shaft tool.

If your engine is leaking oil out of the rear seal then it needs to be fixed since it leaks right into the clutch housing. If it isn't leaking then leave it alone. If you have a hydraulic clutch inspect your slave cylinder for leaks also, you don't want that leaking in there either. On a mechanical clutch check the clutch fork and pivot point, if it is worn or cracked then replace it.

I don't know specifically about your particular vehicle; but most of the time when you pull the transmission in a front wheel drive you must at least partially support the engine. Usually by hanging it from above using a support structure that straddles the engine compartment. You will likely have to devise some way to hold the engine as removing the transmission also removes a major part of what holds the engine up in place.

On many vehicles it is easier to just pull the engine, in spite of what the shop manual says. Some vehicles require the removal of major suspension and sub frame components to remove the trans-axle assembly. In some cases this is done by supporting the parts and lifting the entire car up with a hoist. Not saying that it can't be done in the home garage, but it may end up being harder than just going in through the top.
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Old 02-19-2013, 12:11 PM   #24
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


Thanks for all that info, I basically agree (with what little knowledge I have on cars) with everything you said.

The only things I can really comment on is I have looked everywhere... my shop manual, online, etc... and I can't find a replaceable pilot bearing/bushing in my car so it may not have one that can be replaced.

And the other thing is about the rear main seal... I don't know how long those are supposed to last. But mine is 13 years old now with 80K miles on it so I don't know if it should be replaced even if it ISN'T leaking due to its age. I've never touched one, but I don't know if age itself takes a toll on that seal so I'm still questioning whether it should be replaced or not.

Anyways, I'm ready to get this thing started and finished. I just have to wait till I get a few days off of work so I can work on this.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:59 AM   #25
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General and Specific Questions on Clutch Replacement 2000 Celica GTS


very nice and informative thread I like it so much.

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