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Old 09-29-2013, 11:21 AM   #16
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Fuel line repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardway View Post
Lotek you are missing the big picture!
It is time to replace the entire vehicle.
But that is not in the big picture.
This is my second vehicle, I drive it 10 miles round trip twice a month.
It is more about keeping it running then dumping money in it.
Replacing 4 tires may be a decison, do I want to put $600.00 worth of tires on it or is it time to go.
This is a do it your self site, sometimes ya have to improvise, adapt over come.
It is easy to say just replace everything with new.

Lotek what is the issue with cutting a hole in the floor of a rusted out 25 year old vehicle? Some vehicles come with an inspection plate.

At any rate the old girl is up and running again.
Not really missing the 'big picture', had one of these in a year or so ago with a similar access hole cut, the Airtex pump had failed, took 30 minutes to get the tank out including cutting off the seized tank strap bolts, looked up and saw the sawzall and angle grinder cuts. With the disassembly involved and the time it takes to cut the hole, not to mention the danger involved in cutting near a leaking fuel system, it just doesn't make a lot of sense to do it that way. There's "improvise, adapt over come" and then there's "Hold my beer"... But to each his own, just wanted to inject a bit of caution for someone else contemplating a similar repair. Fuel systems, brakes and steering are no place to take shortcuts. It can endanger not only the driver and his passengers, but everyone else on the road with him. For 20 miles a month, it might be cheaper to take a cab.


Last edited by Lotek; 09-29-2013 at 11:24 AM.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:00 PM   #17
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Fuel line repair


i am holding in my hand a toyota in tank fuel pump for a fuel injected car and it has solid lines all the way to the bolted cap for the gas tank. INSIDE the gas tank it has a rubber fuel hose with cheesy hose clamps. the hose is about three inches long clamped on both ends, original, not aftermarket and not a return line.on a separate note, we used double hose clamps before when we broke down in other trucks. it was only temporary and it never leaked. ill see if i can load a picture of this thing.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:24 PM   #18
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Fuel line repair


http://i824.photobucket.com/albums/z...ps256aa61f.jpg
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:29 PM   #19
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Fuel line repair


whoa that was a big picture. lets try that againFuel line repair-img_0372-1-.jpg
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:31 PM   #20
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Fuel line repair


before i took it apart
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Old 09-29-2013, 04:21 PM   #21
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Fuel line repair


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Originally Posted by Shaynecalkins View Post
i am holding in my hand a toyota in tank fuel pump for a fuel injected car and it has solid lines all the way to the bolted cap for the gas tank. INSIDE the gas tank it has a rubber fuel hose with cheesy hose clamps. the hose is about three inches long clamped on both ends, original, not aftermarket and not a return line.on a separate note, we used double hose clamps before when we broke down in other trucks. it was only temporary and it never leaked. ill see if i can load a picture of this thing.
That's actually a special type of fuel line that is fuel resistant on both the inside and outside, very common to see that setup on older systems, the rubber line acts as an isolator to keep the vibrations from the pump from travelling up the fuel line and resonating so that it can be heard inside the vehicle. As long as the surface of the pipe is clean and smooth and has a barb at the end, a double clamped piece of high pressure fuel injection hose is a perfectly acceptable way of connecting the tank to the hard line at the frame. Btw, those are special high tension spring clamps in your pics, they work better than screw clamps in that application, they don't cut into the hose and don't vibrate loose.

Last edited by Lotek; 09-29-2013 at 04:24 PM.
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Old 09-29-2013, 05:19 PM   #22
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Fuel line repair


now that i look at these clamps i see that they are two clamps, one inside the other. so he is looking to attach steel braided hose to steel pipe. how would you "barb" an antique piece of steel fuel line? steel braid can be attached to a threaded barb then high pressure rubber to the old pump, but the old pump still has unbarbed steel and no way to separate.here is a picture of the barb.
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Fuel line repair-img_0373-1-.jpg  

Last edited by Shaynecalkins; 09-29-2013 at 05:22 PM.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:01 PM   #23
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Fuel line repair


You can do the first half of a double flare...if the pipe is in good shape, otherwise, replace the pipe up to the point where you do have good steel or an oem union.
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Old 09-29-2013, 07:27 PM   #24
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Fuel line repair


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Originally Posted by Lotek View Post
Not really missing the 'big picture', had one of these in a year or so ago with a similar access hole cut, the Airtex pump had failed, took 30 minutes to get the tank out including cutting off the seized tank strap bolts, looked up and saw the sawzall and angle grinder cuts. With the disassembly involved and the time it takes to cut the hole, not to mention the danger involved in cutting near a leaking fuel system, it just doesn't make a lot of sense to do it that way. There's "improvise, adapt over come" and then there's "Hold my beer"... But to each his own, just wanted to inject a bit of caution for someone else contemplating a similar repair. Fuel systems, brakes and steering are no place to take shortcuts. It can endanger not only the driver and his passengers, but everyone else on the road with him. For 20 miles a month, it might be cheaper to take a cab.

I cut the hole in the floor with no sparks at all, did not use a grinder or a saws all.
Can't fit all the equipment in cab.
There is absolutely no safety issue with the repair I made.
I used steel line and double flare.
I don't drink and my repairs are always safe.

Last edited by Hardway; 09-29-2013 at 07:29 PM.
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:40 PM   #25
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Fuel line repair


if you look at his picture i did not see any good steel. He was afraid if he took it loose at the union it would twist or break the pipe. I think his question short and sweet was the same question most of us has asked at one time in our past....will two hose clamps be sufficiant to hold a pressurized fuel line. I dont think anyone wants to give a guy a straight answer because of what COULD happen should it fail. ive done it and lived to tell the tale. and i think im not the only one. But.... i dont know if i would call it a permanent fix. I would feel better about a barb now that ive seen the factory do it. Maybe my pictures will clear up a little of the mystery for people that assumed it was solid all the way to the pump....i did.assume that is. i thought it was all high pressure line. I also had a truck where they changed the in tank pump to a 100 dollar holly that mounted on a frame rail. I dont know how they disabled the in tank pump.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:50 PM   #26
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Fuel line repair


Shaynecalkins I did not use any hose or clamps for the repair. The hose clamp in the photo I put it there on the OEM high pressure hose that has a stainless steel casing, so when I flared it, it would not be disturbed. I double flare the peace of steel tube OEM attached to the OEM hose. My orignal question was will standard fuel hose hold up under pressure. Which I was suspect that it would. I did not add any hose, I used steel line with double flares and brass couplings.

Shaynecalkins thanks for your response.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:54 PM   #27
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Fuel line repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaynecalkins View Post
if you look at his picture i did not see any good steel. He was afraid if he took it loose at the union it would twist or break the pipe. I think his question short and sweet was the same question most of us has asked at one time in our past....will two hose clamps be sufficiant to hold a pressurized fuel line. I dont think anyone wants to give a guy a straight answer because of what COULD happen should it fail. ive done it and lived to tell the tale. and i think im not the only one. But.... i dont know if i would call it a permanent fix. I would feel better about a barb now that ive seen the factory do it. Maybe my pictures will clear up a little of the mystery for people that assumed it was solid all the way to the pump....i did.assume that is. i thought it was all high pressure line. I also had a truck where they changed the in tank pump to a 100 dollar holly that mounted on a frame rail. I dont know how they disabled the in tank pump.
"I would feel better about a barb now that ive seen the factory do it."

I have in the past double flared a line and sliped the house over the flare and placed two clamps on it.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:09 PM   #28
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Fuel line repair


i use 3/8 compression fittings to join those lines. My wife threw that fuel pump away about a year ago, brand new in the box, I could have sent it to you. Now I am Mad all over again
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:11 PM   #29
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Fuel line repair


i misunderstood, i thought the fitting was to rusted to break free so it was to be eliminated. the rubber hose i have has a internal cloth braid formed into the rubber so i dont know if thats "standard" i have a piece outside, i will go look. my aftermarket standard fuel line has six strings in it, my oem high pressure fuel line has 12. hope that helps. i know you got it fixed already but ive asked the same questions and did not have pieces to check against. so here is pictures for anyone else.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:22 PM   #30
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Fuel line repair


i was thinking compression fitting too, but auto repair is not my main expertise. alot of time i go to ask for compression fitting for this stuff and the guy get that "deer in the headlights" look and says; you know this is a car,right? not household plumbing. the sizes are all wrong.pfft! compression fitting always works. get me a "sharkbite" dangit ill fix this.(JOKING...DONT DO THAT)

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