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-   -   broken lug studs (http://www.diychatroom.com/f46/broken-lug-studs-5973/)

LanterDan 01-16-2007 10:19 PM

broken lug studs
 
I had my car aligned the other day. The shop broke one the lug studs getting the wheel off. I think this is the probably the 4th or 5th stud I've broken on this car over 4 years (I'm very good at replacing them now). I can't figure out why this is. It is always on the front wheels, so far I haven't broken one of the rear ones yet. I have a very hard time beleiving that I'm over tightening them. Any ideas?

fwiw, 94 Honda Accord

Rehabber 01-17-2007 08:49 AM

Studs usually break due to overtorquing the wheel studs. The new stud can be easily overtorqued dduring installation if it is 'pulled in' instead of pressed in.

LanterDan 01-17-2007 05:35 PM

The problem I have with this explanation is that only the front studs are braking. If I were overtorqueing them, then why I have I never broken a rear one?

Rehabber 01-17-2007 08:43 PM

They only have to be overtorqued once to overstress the studs. The front studs have more natural stress due to acceleration/braking forces and turning forces.

redline 01-18-2007 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LanterDan (Post 30240)
It is always on the front wheels, so far I haven't broken one of the rear ones yet. I have a very hard time beleiving that I'm over tightening them. Any ideas?

fwiw, 94 Honda Accord

Do you apply anti-seize coumpound on the threads before you put the lugs nuts back on?

The heat from the front brake rotors may be heating the lugs up and creating this problem. Are you aggressive on the brakes making them to heat up?

LanterDan 01-18-2007 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redline (Post 30551)
Do you apply anti-seize coumpound on the threads before you put the lugs nuts back on?

No, I was always under the impression that any sort of lubricant like this wasn't permitted on wheel studs. I will look into this.


Quote:

Originally Posted by redline (Post 30551)
The heat from the front brake rotors may be heating the lugs up and creating this problem. Are you aggressive on the brakes making them to heat up?

I don't beleive I've particularily aggressive. I'm certianly not wearing out the pads very quickly.

I should have also noted the mechanic who did the alignment mentioned that he seen a lot more of them brake recently. I've also noted that the last few replacement studs/nuts have seems a little loose to me, as though there wasn't enough thread engagement. I will probably try another supplier in the future.

elementx440 01-25-2007 09:09 PM

Have any of the ones you replaced broken? Is it shearing off? Are you using a torque wrench to properly torque the bolts? It's almost a requirement on aluminum wheels... but I still couldn't imagine it really breaking a steel lug...

and I would refrain from putting any compounds on the lugs... it's the one part of the car you don't want easy loosening of :wink:

tvlfleming 02-07-2007 03:49 PM

Are you replacing studs and nuts or just studs? Are you running aluminum wheels or steel. Also as stated before pressing them in is proper way to do it, dont use nut to draw them in. It stretches the stud drawing them in with nut.

madrob100 04-24-2008 12:14 AM

how'd you get them out?
 
how did you get the old lugs out and new one in? on the 2002 accords, the circular lug plate is suppodily pressed on to the front wheel bearing. i managed to get the old pieces out (with much pain) but there isn't enough clearence to get the new piece.

thx!

2002 Honda accord coupe EX
186,000

LanterDan 04-25-2008 09:00 AM

With the 94 Accord I was able to swing the brake caliper bracket up out of the way, and get access the back of the studs (Flip the caliper up like you were replacing brakes, then remove the bottom bolt of the caliper bracket, loosen the top one and swing upwards and wire it up so it stays out of your way. You’ll have to rotate the brake disc to the right position to get to each of the studs.) I took them out with a hammer and a punch. I once had one of them that required a few good knocks to get out, but all the rest came fairly easily.

Rehabber and tvlfemming may be right that you are supposed to press the studs in (the dealer service manual seems silent on the matter) but I pulled them in with the lugnut. If you elect to press them in then you’ll have to remove the steering knuckle and find yourself an arbor press.

I hate to neglect the experience of those who know more than me, but I didn’t really need anymore torque to pull the studs in than you would use to put the wheel on anyway (although you will want to check their tightness a couple time after having driven the car a little) so I’m not seeing why this is such a terrible idea. Anyway, the only studs to have broken where the original ones, not any of the ones I’ve replaced. Maybe I’ve just been lucky. (I don’t put a torque wrench on my lug nuts either.)

The first time I did this it took me over an hour to figure it out. I could do it well under ten minute now, although I finally got smart and pre-emptively replaced all my studs and haven’t had a problem since.

wire_twister 04-25-2008 09:11 PM

I worked in a dealership for 10 years, never pressed in a replacement stud, always used a stack of washers and a nut of the proper thread to install them, no comebacks as far as I know. This was a GM dealer so I think the studs were bigger than your Honda. Always use a torque wrench when tightning lug nuts, not because of worry over breaking studs, but to prevent warping of brake rotors. As far as using anti-sieze compound, this is a good idea, in fact recomended in most GM service manuals. I have been using it for years and havent had a lug loosen itself yet.

Mr Chips 04-27-2008 12:01 AM

i was also also taught to use "Never Seize" on studs before putting lug nuts on, have been doing this for 25 years, never lost a wheel....... YET

Boz 05-15-2008 09:58 PM

Overheating is often the cause, usually from bearing issues.

RedsRR 05-24-2008 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LanterDan (Post 30558)
No, I was always under the impression that any sort of lubricant like this wasn't permitted on wheel studs. I will look into this.



Just make sure to ONLY get it on threads and NOT the contact surface between lug nuts & wheel or you will snap the stud every time.

Bondo 05-31-2008 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Chips (Post 119353)
i was also also taught to use "Never Seize" on studs before putting lug nuts on, have been doing this for 25 years, never lost a wheel....... YET

Ayuh,.....

About the Only thing I can be accused of doing Liberally,....
Is applying Never-Sieze to Lugs,+ other under-Chassis stuff......
And,....
I've been doing it Alot Longer than Mr. Chipps...........

A Loose lug will Break,.. Long before an Over-Tightened lug......


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