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-   -   2000 VR6 Jetta Brake Job? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f46/2000-vr6-jetta-brake-job-75053/)

jpearson311 06-30-2010 10:30 AM

2000 VR6 Jetta Brake Job?
 
I need to replace the pads and rotors on my 2000 VR6 VW Jetta. I've replaced the front pads already a few months ago, but my sensor light came back on like 2 days later. The rotors needed replaced too, but I didn't do it at the time so I figured I better go ahead and do it.

I've googled a bit to find a good tutorial on how best to do it, but I couldn't really find anything. Does anyone know of a good online tutorial/video on how to do this? Preferably with pics? Thanks!

Jesse

Yoyizit 06-30-2010 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpearson311 (Post 463458)
I've replaced the front pads already a few months ago, but my sensor light came back on like 2 days later.

So did the pads wear that fast or is the sensor giving you a 'false positive' signal?

jpearson311 06-30-2010 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yoyizit (Post 463581)
So did the pads wear that fast or is the sensor giving you a 'false positive' signal?

I looked at the pads on my lunch break through the rim and the sensor was still connected at the plug. However, the sensor is only on one pad (driver side front) and it looked like the pad was worn unevenly. Like the rotor was warped or something. The pad was thicker on the side opposite from where the sensor wire connects to it, but I couldn't tell if it was all the way down or not.

I do know that the sensor light came back on like 2 days after I replaced the pads and has been on ever since so I don't imagine it's the pad. The rotors still need replaced despite.

Jesse

Yoyizit 06-30-2010 03:31 PM

Spending more on parts increases your certainty of 'no call backs.' You may need new calipers.

The principle of brakes is simple but the trouble they can give you is not so simple.
Your problems may be caused by dimensions that are out of spec by a few thousandths of an inch. There might also be a Tech Service Bulletin or recall or hidden warranty on these brakes.

jpearson311 06-30-2010 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yoyizit (Post 463601)
Spending more on parts increases your certainty of 'no call backs.' You may need new calipers.

The principle of brakes is simple but the trouble they can give you is not so simple.
Your problems may be caused by dimensions that are out of spec by a few thousandths of an inch. There might also be a Tech Service Bulletin or recall or hidden warranty on these brakes.

I'm going to replace the pads and rotors all the way around and see what happens. The rotors look terrible. Wish me luck!

Jesse

liquidvw 06-30-2010 03:54 PM

I've done this job 5 times or more as my entire family drives vw's. Its really easy but you'll need a few special tools. You'll need a c clamp to compress the front pistons or they make a special tool to push in the caliper. There is a set screw that holds the front rotors on. Its a pain to remove with a regular screw driver. They make a impact screw driver that you can hit with hammer and it will turn the screw 1/8 of a turn. This works well for removing the set screw. If you don't have this you can always drill out the set screw. All it really does is line up the holes on your rotor correctly. Lastly for the rears you'll need tool to spin the rear piston in. You can rent this or buy it.

First always change the rotors. You'll be sorry if you don't.

As far as the job goes. Remove the cap for the break fluid resevor on the master cyl. For the front, jack up, remove tires. Remove the set screw in the rotor. Remove caliper bolts, then the caliper. Replace pads. There will be a sensor on the driver side which will need to be unclipped. Check the slildes and grease if necessary. Remove the bracket that holds the caliper and remove the rotor. Re install in reverse.

The rear is the same but there is no sensor and its not necessary to remove the caliper bracket. You can usually slip the rotor out and back in without removal of the bracket. Make sure you spin in the rear pistons. They don't go straight in and out like the fronts. Good luck :thumbsup:.

Now might be a good time to think about bleeding the breaks. If so, make sure you use DOT 4.

jpearson311 06-30-2010 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liquidvw (Post 463613)
I've done this job 5 times or more as my entire family drives vw's. Its really easy but you'll need a few special tools. You'll need a c clamp to compress the front pistons or they make a special tool to push in the caliper. There is a set screw that holds the front rotors on. Its a pain to remove with a regular screw driver. They make a impact screw driver that you can hit with hammer and it will turn the screw 1/8 of a turn. This works well for removing the set screw. If you don't have this you can always drill out the set screw. All it really does is line up the holes on your rotor correctly. Lastly for the rears you'll need tool to spin the rear piston in. You can rent this or buy it.

First always change the rotors. You'll be sorry if you don't.

As far as the job goes. Remove the cap for the break fluid resevor on the master cyl. For the front, jack up, remove tires. Remove the set screw in the rotor. Remove caliper bolts, then the caliper. Replace pads. There will be a sensor on the driver side which will need to be unclipped. Check the slildes and grease if necessary. Remove the bracket that holds the caliper and remove the rotor. Re install in reverse.

The rear is the same but there is no sensor and its not necessary to remove the caliper bracket. You can usually slip the rotor out and back in without removal of the bracket. Make sure you spin in the rear pistons. They don't go straight in and out like the fronts. Good luck :thumbsup:.

Now might be a good time to think about bleeding the breaks. If so, make sure you use DOT 4.

Awesome, thanks liquid! I've replaced the pads on the rear before, but if I can recall, I just used a regular c-clamp to press in the pistons. If I want to bleed the brakes, I just disconnect the brake lines from the calipers, put a catch container under it and press in the break pedal or? I'll also suck the fluid out of the master cylinder with a turkey baster or something. Is the set screw on the rotors a phillips, flat head or star? Thanks!

Jesse

liquidvw 06-30-2010 04:16 PM

The set screw is phillips. To bleed the brakes you'll need a few people and I like to use a piece of clear hose. Keep making sure that the master cyl is full of fluid during the process as you don't want to suck any air in.

I slip the hose over the bleeding screw on the caliper. Then I have someone press and hold the break pedal. I open the bleeder screw on the caliper. When the pedal hits bottom. I close the bleeder. Then repeat. Keep doing this until the fluid is clear. There is an order of what wheel you do. If I remember correctly its right rear, left rear, right front, left front. Don't quote me on that though. You'll want to consult the Bentley manual as this order will likely change depending on what ABS system is in your car.

cellophane 06-30-2010 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpearson311 (Post 463458)
I need to replace the pads and rotors on my 2000 VR6 VW Jetta. I've replaced the front pads already a few months ago, but my sensor light came back on like 2 days later. The rotors needed replaced too, but I didn't do it at the time so I figured I better go ahead and do it.

Slightly OT - what do you use to check your service codes? The shop here will always look at them for me for free but it would be nice to do it myself. ('02 TDI Jetta here)

liquidvw 06-30-2010 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cellophane (Post 463624)
Slightly OT - what do you use to check your service codes? The shop here will always look at them for me for free but it would be nice to do it myself. ('02 TDI Jetta here)


http://www.ross-tech.com/

47_47 07-01-2010 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liquidvw (Post 463613)
Check the slildes and grease if necessary.

This is probably the cause of your uneven pad wear. The pads must slide freely to apply/retract properly. Good info and follow the rest of liquidvw post. :thumbsup:

jpearson311 07-01-2010 11:19 AM

Thanks everyone for your help. I think I can pull this off. My shop told me that it's $320 for a front brake job and $410 for the rear. And this is in Ohio. There is no way I'm paying that. Thanks!

Jesse

Tarmac Wizard 07-02-2010 09:26 AM

most likely the uneven pad wear is because the rotors weren't machined when your pads were initially replaced, so the build up on your rotors caused the pads to wear unevenly. If there's no wobble or weird movement on braking then the rotors aren't warped, although the pads may not have been seated correctly.

you can also check out a place like www.primechoiceautoparts.com and price their parts in comparison

jpearson311 07-02-2010 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tarmac Wizard (Post 464293)
most likely the uneven pad wear is because the rotors weren't machined when your pads were initially replaced, so the build up on your rotors caused the pads to wear unevenly. If there's no wobble or weird movement on braking then the rotors aren't warped, although the pads may not have been seated correctly.

you can also check out a place like www.primechoiceautoparts.com and price their parts in comparison

Thanks for your reply. The uneven pad wear is only happening at one wheel. The front left. I've inspected all of them. I'm replacing the rotors all the way around and the pads. Wish me luck.

Jesse

Tarmac Wizard 07-02-2010 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpearson311 (Post 464305)
Thanks for your reply. The uneven pad wear is only happening at one wheel. The front left. I've inspected all of them. I'm replacing the rotors all the way around and the pads. Wish me luck.

Jesse

good luck!


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