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Old 05-12-2009, 07:57 PM   #16
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Radon in the basement


Part of me thinks it's all voodoo too. But we've got kids. So we had a system installed that vents it out of the sump pump hole out the side of the house, and up towards the rough. The hole thing cost about $400. And we made the seller pay for it when we bought the house.

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Old 05-12-2009, 08:07 PM   #17
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Part of me thinks it's all voodoo too. But we've got kids.
Madame Curie could tell you it isn't voodoo if only she were alive.
And cell damage on a molecular level can take 20 years to show up.
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Old 06-14-2009, 08:27 PM   #18
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Radon in the basement


Is radon in a home as serious as it appears? I think not!! If it was serious why did our Government leaders cancel funding back in 1997? I think they just stirred up fear because some big company lobbist got what they wanted, to instill fear and get more business.

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Hey all,

Just had the inspector out. Apparently we have pretty high levels of radon in the basement (no shocker there), but we are going to be transforming the basement into a master bed suite so we want to do something to mitigate the potential problems.

Our realtor told us that installing a "radon fan" will cure the problem as it will siphon the radioactive particles out of the air every few hours. Are these a good enough fix for an area that will be slept in on a regular basis?

Any other suggestions as to how to mitigate it? I was pushing my better half for lead-reinforced floors but you know wives. :-)
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Old 06-15-2009, 10:51 AM   #19
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I inherited a bunch of magazines, one of which said that 20,000/yr [out of 330M people in the US] die from radon related lung cancer. Haven't tried to verify this.

40,000/yr die on the highways
5,000/yr from food poisoning
60,000/yr from guns
90,000/yr from hospitals
1000/day from smoking
55/yr from lightning
1 injury in 50 yrs from a meterorite
1300/yr from elec.
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Old 07-13-2009, 06:14 AM   #20
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Radon in the basement


My friend has a Radon set-up in his house and recently the fan just gave out. Although the fan itself cost about $120, I to am a skeptic with this Radon thing.

He and I agree with Freetown in that this whole thing was conjured up and lobbyist won the day in Washington and then we have a Radon scare.

After considering the fact that his house sits on an area comprised only of sand and how deep that is I don't know, but the sand pit just a couple couple blocks away goes down about 30 feet, I suspect it's the same under my friends house.

So with the pipe already in place, he's inclined to just put in a coupling in place of the fan and call it good. He's got a finished basement, the kids are out of the house and he and his wife are not smokers. Right now his concern is keeping the work coming in order to keep his home and not some radon scam. No one needs to be reminded of the current status of the construction industry.

We both think this whole Radon thing is a scam, and this article sheds a bit of light on that.

If his house was in an area that was conducive to high levels, yes he would probably buy the fan to keep the misses happy, but on sand! Probably not.
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Old 07-13-2009, 09:45 AM   #21
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Go ahead and try converting to a passive system as they can reduce levels by about 50%. But please do a follow up test. Assumptions can't be made on the neighbors levels, it be that fickle.

Val
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Old 07-13-2009, 06:12 PM   #22
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Go ahead and try converting to a passive system as they can reduce levels by about 50%. But please do a follow up test. Assumptions can't be made on the neighbors levels, it be that fickle.

Val
But let me ask you...? Considering that every house in the neighborhood sits on sand, what are the chances of Radon?
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Old 07-13-2009, 06:25 PM   #23
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Radon in the basement


It doesn't matter, the radon could be coming from the sand or from sources below the sand. Every state has some issses with radon, the only sure way to find out is to test. DIY testing will only run about $20.
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:27 AM   #24
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Radon in the basement


I don't mean to get too far off track but I have read studies that suggest low level radiation is actually GOOD for you . From what I understand it stresses your cells kind of like weight lifting stresses your muscles.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664640/

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By far, the greatest exposure to low level radiation is the inhalation of the radon gas present in the air (Figure 5). Radon is produced by uranium radioactivity in the natural environment. A scientific test of the LNT model, as normally used, clearly disproved the LNT hypothesis (Figure 7). Lung cancer mortality is lower in US counties where the radon concentration in homes is higher (Cohen 1995). In the few counties with exceptionally low radon radiation, lung cancer mortality is higher, as shown schematically in Figure 9. Instead of discarding or modifying the LNT assumption, the defenders of this linear calculation procedure raised generic objections (an ecological study) that were not really applicable to the test. There were no defensible objections to the test or its conclusions; yet the authorities continue to accept the unscientific ICRP recommendations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7814250

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Data on lung cancer mortality rates vs. average radon concentration in homes for 1,601 U.S. counties are used to test the linear-no threshold theory. The widely recognized problems with ecological studies, as applied to this work, are addressed extensively. With or without corrections for variations in smoking prevalence, there is a strong tendency for lung cancer rates to decrease with increasing radon exposure, in sharp contrast to the increase expected from the theory. The discrepancy in slope is about 20 standard deviations. It is shown that uncertainties in lung cancer rates, radon exposures, and smoking prevalence are not important and that confounding by 54 socioeconomic factors, by geography, and by altitude and climate can explain only a small fraction of the discrepancy. Effects of known radon-smoking prevalence correlations--rural people have higher radon levels and smoke less than urban people, and smokers are exposed to less radon than non-smokers--are calculated and found to be trivial. In spite of extensive efforts, no potential explanation for the discrepancy other than failure of the linear-no threshold theory for carcinogenesis from inhaled radon decay products could be found.
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:56 PM   #25
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I don't mean to get too far off track but I have read studies that suggest low level radiation is actually GOOD for you . From what I understand it stresses your cells kind of like weight lifting stresses your muscles.
And so does no radon exposure do you harm?

Do they mean 1/20th of a standard deviation?

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Old 04-19-2010, 01:21 PM   #26
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And so does no radon exposure do you harm?
Lack of radon doesn't harm you, but the research suggests LOW doses have a beneficial hormetic effect by stressing your cells so they are better able to repair DNA damage from cigarette smoke for example.

A glass of wine every day does you good, but a bottle a day will mess you up. Same sort of principle.

It's just a hypothesis so I would still mitigate the radon if I was going to spend significant lengths of time down there each day.

Here's an article specifically about radon exposure:

http://www.physorg.com/news125672761.html
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:25 PM   #27
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Radon in the basement


I will weigh in on this as a medical radiographer. Any level of exposure to ionizing radiation should be limited/reduced wherever possible. True we are all exposed to background levels on a daily basis that cannot be avouded. Examples we refer to is that a chest x-rayis equal to 2 months exposure to background radiation. An abdominal CT scan equalls 2-3 years background. I for one would not want to be sleeping in an are that had higher than acceptable levels of radon. These affects are cumulative over ones lifetime. Where this is a consideration is in a home with children. They are being exposed at a younger age and are more vulnerable over their lifetimes than say, elderly persons. The younger you are, the longer your exposure, the greater your risk.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:19 AM   #28
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I will weigh in on this as a medical radiographer. Any level of exposure to ionizing radiation should be limited/reduced wherever possible. True we are all exposed to background levels on a daily basis that cannot be avouded. Examples we refer to is that a chest x-rayis equal to 2 months exposure to background radiation. An abdominal CT scan equalls 2-3 years background. I for one would not want to be sleeping in an are that had higher than acceptable levels of radon. These affects are cumulative over ones lifetime. Where this is a consideration is in a home with children. They are being exposed at a younger age and are more vulnerable over their lifetimes than say, elderly persons. The younger you are, the longer your exposure, the greater your risk.
That's what I thought, but this is out of my field.
How do you account for these posted research results?
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Old 04-20-2010, 05:49 PM   #29
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Radon in the basement


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That's what I thought, but this is out of my field.
How do you account for these posted research results?
Simply stated, I disagree with the posts that dismiss high radon levels as hype. You will always find research with contradictory claims. All research is subject to some degree of bias and error. That's Statistics 101. Just because there are studies that suggest that low levels of radon exposure can boost your immune system, does not mean that one should seek out low levels of radon exposure.

On topic, one should not knowingly sleep in a basement and be exposed to 5mCi when gov't regs state that action should be taken at levels of 4mCi and above. It should be relatively simple and inexpenseve to mitigate and bring this to a safe level.

Radon was never an issue when fuel was cheap and folks slept with their bedroom windows open. Nowadays we have our houses all buttoned up resulting in gasses being trapped at unsafe levels. On the same note, smoking was not an issue when the average life expectancy was somewhere in the 40's or 50's.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:29 PM   #30
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Radon in the basement


http://www.euradon.de/euradon-eng/index.php?page=10

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