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Old 03-04-2008, 01:56 PM   #1
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lead paint abatement


i have several brick wall sections in my basement from which i would like to remove the old paint to expose the brick for aesthetics. i was planning to do it using a 4.5-in grinder and a brush attachment.

i was wondering if a gas-mask type respirator would suffice protecting or whether i should have an entire hazmat suit ? also, what are some other implications ? i guess it would be highly recommended to thoroughly ventilate the area and shopvac it afterwards.

i am also posting this in the paint section (moderator, please do not remove).

thanks,

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Old 04-03-2008, 04:30 PM   #2
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lead paint abatement


The first thing I would do is chip down through the layers of paint carefully and have it tested for lead. Then plan from the results. Lead contamination is a nasty thing. Asbestos attacks the respiratory system and can take it's good old time. Lead attacks lots of things and does it much quicker and with more certainty.

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Old 05-06-2009, 07:35 PM   #3
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lead paint abatement


Ok - Here's my practical thoughts about lead paint. Don't grind or sand dry. Consider non-sanding paint removal alternatives - chemical stripers or IR heat. Get some coveralls and boot covers or dedicated shoes - do not wear them away from your work area. The easiest way to reduce your own exposure is to: Wash your hands EVERY time you leave the work area.
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Old 05-22-2009, 11:52 AM   #4
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lead paint abatement


The mask should work to protect you while you're working if it has a HEPA filter, but you'll be sending lead contaminated dust flying everywhere in your house. You'll need to move all furniture, rugs, etc. out of the room. I would then use a double layer of 6 mil plastic sheeting and staples and duct tape to attach it to cover all surfaces where you won't be removing lead paint and seal the doors of the room with a double layer as well, cutting a flap in each sheet for a door. Ensure that your HVAC is off and all vents are sealed with double 6 mil poly and duct tape. Use heat stripping or wet sanding with a HEPA vacuum, never dry sand lead paint. Afterwards you can wet everything down and strip down your poly, double bag it, and dispose of it one layer at a time.
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Old 09-27-2009, 04:20 AM   #5
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lead paint abatement


You should not just bag the stuff up and landfill it. Contact a disposal company even though it will cost you.
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Old 09-29-2009, 10:02 AM   #6
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lead paint abatement


Start by going here:
www.epa.gov/lead
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Old 10-29-2009, 07:16 PM   #7
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First off, I know this thread was started almost two years ago, but I think this really needs to be said as this is not the first time I have seen lead paint questions on this forum.

LEAD ABATEMENT/REMOVAL IS NOT A DIY PROJECT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Lead builds up in the body and is stored in your bone marrow. You could ingest lead and be perfectly healthy for 20 years or more and then out of nowhere, you now have lead poisoning.

There are serious side effects to ingesting lead. These include brain damage, bone density loss, kidney failure, nervous system shutdown, immune system failure, and many others. And if you experience these side effects, lead can actually alter your DNA so that these problems can be passed to any kids you have in the future.

If you do any lead work on your home improperly and someone gets lead poisoning, including the next owner, YOU are liable for it. Trust me, the medical bills alone could be more than what your house is worth.

There is enough lead in a paint chip the size of your thumbnail to kill the average sized man. It's not too tough to ingest that amount of paint in an abatement project if you do not take the right precautions.

For example, if you use a regular shop vac to clean up the paint chips, you are doing more harm than good. If your vac is not equipped with a quality HEPA filter, all you are doing is spreading lead around, as well as making it airborn, making it easier to ingest.

Without sealing off a room well enough, and having a clean/dirty holding area, you also are just spreading lead around.

In most cases, you are better off properly encapsulating the lead containing surface through proper procedures and product usage and covering it up.
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Old 11-02-2009, 12:43 PM   #8
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lead paint abatement


thanks, this makes perfect sense.
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Old 01-03-2010, 11:03 AM   #9
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lead paint abatement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Handy_Business View Post
There are new EPA rules coming into effect in 2010 that require a certified renovator to perform work in homes containing lead paint. Here is a link to the EPA site http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/renovation.htm that has a lot of information.
Same link, certified not required IF you are working on your own home:

Quote:
If you are a homeowner performing renovation, repair, or painting work in your own home, EPA's RRP rule does not cover your project
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Old 01-04-2010, 01:56 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Same link, certified not required IF you are working on your own home:
If you plan on selling it at some point lead abatement could become a major closing issue starting this year. Proof of abatement is a real deal buster if you mess around and attempt it yourself starting a few days ago where I live. Doesn't mean you should not do it yourself but you had better be really sure you do it right. You will be asked at your house closing when you sell.
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Old 01-14-2010, 04:11 PM   #11
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lead paint abatement


Here is a link for from the EPA on lead safety: www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/renovaterightbrochure.pdf). Although the upcoming April 2010 EPA lead dust requirements don't apply to individual homeowners, it is still important to remember the EPA's recommendations for a lead safe work environment. Remember to follow these simple procedures:

1. Contain the work area. Take steps to seal off the work area so that dust and debris do not escape. Warning signs should be put up and heavy-duty plastic and tape should be used to cover the floors and furniture and seal off doors and heating and cooling system vents.

2. Minimize dust. Use work practices that minimize the dust generated during renovation and repair by using water to mist areas before sanding or scraping; scoring paint before separating components; and prying and pulling apart components instead of breaking them. Dangerous practices such as open flame burning or torching and using power tools without HEPA vacuum attachments are prohibited by the rule because they generate large amounts of lead-contaminated dust.

3. Clean up thoroughly. Work diligently every day to keep the work area as clean as possible. When all the work is done, the area should be cleaned up using special cleaning methods including the use of a HEPA vacuum and wet mopping.

4. Clearance testing. Using a clean rag, wipe the floor of the work area to test if the work area is completely clean. April is right around the corner and certain elements are required now. If you don't currently have a containment system in use, or if yours is slow to install, check out ZipWall's new ZipPole system, it is priced at $179 for four 10' poles, a zipper pack and carrying bag, that's about half the price of the Original ZipWall Portable Containment System, a great savings. ZipPole URL.. It is a great system for jobs with ceilings up to 10'. Check out the details here: http://zipwall.com/lp/zippole.html
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:51 PM   #12
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lead paint abatement


I said it earlier in the thread and I'll say it again- LEAD ABATEMENT IS NOT A DIY PROJECT!

How many diy'ers do you think realize the extent of the safety precautions necessary when dealing with something this toxic? I have never encountered ONE in 15 years in the construction industry.


You MUST wear a respirator while dealing with lead (the 59 cent white masks at the home depot don't count)

The mask must be FITTED TO YOU. Just picking up a respirator off the shelf and putting it on won't protect you from jack shiit.

Just wet moping after an abatement doesn't do anything. You just spread lead around by using a contaminated mop dipped into contaminated water. There are approved cleaning methods for dealing with lead dust.

You can contain lead by putting up plastic, but if you don't know how to install a proper door in the plastic, and know how to take that plastic down, your just going to billow lead contaminants around.

You want to abate lead? I'll show you the 1000 page manual with the rules, regulations, and codes for dealing with lead.


I realize that not everybody can afford to hire a guy like me to make their home safer, but there are numerous government funded programs to help ease the cost.

Is risking your health and the health of you family, not to mention your financial future (if you abate yourself and do it incorrectly, thus inviting a future lawsuit) worth saving a few bucks?
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:13 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
If you plan on selling it at some point lead abatement could become a major closing issue starting this year. Proof of abatement is a real deal buster if you mess around and attempt it yourself starting a few days ago where I live. Doesn't mean you should not do it yourself but you had better be really sure you do it right. You will be asked at your house closing when you sell.
The form you have to fill out is IF you know of any lead paint in your house

I had no knowledge of lead paint in my last house
I have no knowledge of lead paint in this house

Forms I received on last house & this house from prior owners both stated the same thing
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:27 PM   #14
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lead paint abatement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
The form you have to fill out is IF you know of any lead paint in your house

I had no knowledge of lead paint in my last house
I have no knowledge of lead paint in this house

Forms I received on last house & this house from prior owners both stated the same thing
Come on Dave. That is a clever cat and mouse approach but every home inspector called in for approval of a bank loan is going to now have to pinpoint exactly where all lead in your house is. Invite me over, I will click my middle finger against some of your drain pipes to start. If your cat looks more stupid than most, and all her kittens are deformed, I would be guessing exposed lead paint too.

Claiming ignorance does not work starting this year. We all have to bite the bullet and abate when we know of a problem. We should have been on this ages ago voluntarily. Now is mandated.
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:58 PM   #15
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lead paint abatement


Last house was inspected 3x that I know of in 20 years, no report of Lead
This one was inspected 4 times in 15 years, same result
No paint on my PVC drain pipes

Bathroom gutted & redone at some point, entire 2nd floor, outside of the house, all window trim, floors that are not wood
Not much left that is original trim or paint

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