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-   -   Zinsser Gardz (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/zinsser-gardz-118139/)

DrHicks 09-23-2011 04:20 PM

Zinsser Gardz
 
Last night my wife & I painted her (elderly) folks' kitchen. Part of the process was to remove a flowery wall-paper border along the top of the wall.

Her dad had gone to Menards to pick up the primer & paint.

Because of having removed the border, they suggested he get Zinsser Gardz primer - which he did.

I have never used this product before, but was rather impressed. It sealed in any remnants of adhesive, and provided a really good surface for the paint. After the paint dried, everything looked excellent.


Is this a relatively new product? Have any of you used it? Liked it? Disliked it?

Brushjockey 09-23-2011 04:47 PM

It is frequently recommended here- does just about everything you could ask of an oil sealer- but it's not oil.
I never leave home without it!
Because it is so thin- it is a bit tricky to handle- but penetrates and seals, and ready to go in an hour.
Whats not to like?!

m1951mm 09-23-2011 04:51 PM

It has been around for quite some time. It is really good to prime damaged wall board where the paper face is bad. Prime with the Gardz and then mud and you are good to go (mind you, you do have to prime the mud:), and the Gardz will do that very well). I know there are some real fans here about the product. I use it for certain things, but I have had adhesive (not GLUE:thumbsup:) bleed back through in some applications. Makes me skiddish, but with all the good comments may have to try it again if and when the issue comes up again.

Yes it is a really good sealer!!!!!!!!! Runny, but good. And being a clear primer it can make touch ups easier rather than trying to cover a white primer.

DrHicks 09-23-2011 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 734704)
It is frequently recommended here- does just about everything you could ask of an oil sealer- but it's not oil.
I never leave home without it!
Because it is so thin- it is a bit tricky to handle- but penetrates and seals, and ready to go in an hour.
Whats not to like?!

The thin/tricky to handle part was the only thing I found less than stellar. Being clear, I had to pay very close attention to where I had applied it, and how much.

Do you ever use it as a general primer, or only when you're hiding/sealing stuff? Is there any priming application you absolutely would NOT use it for?

Brushjockey 09-23-2011 05:05 PM

Here is what I use it for the most
#1!- after paper stripping and after paste has been cleaned
#2- spot priming mud - particularly when the finish is more than a flat
#3- to seal damaged sheetrock paper before mudding
#4- priming new sheetrock - again when finish is more than flat
#5- before hanging wallcoverings
#6- sealing the edge of tape so that paint doesn't creep underneath.

m1951mm 09-23-2011 05:06 PM

When I use it I use a 1/4 nap roller and no pressing of the roller, strickly glide it. It is not one that you dip your brush and tap on the side to fill the brush, for a change this is one that you wipe some off the brush after dipping. (Please correct me if you think I am wrong Brush:).) I usually cut the top and roll very quickly after the cut in to keep the dripping down. It will not seal water damage, wood stain or other issues that will come back through a water borne product, but other than that, it is a good primer once you get the hang of using it.

Brush, you must type way faster than I, every time I go to answer you have already been there-----------Too funny

Brushjockey 09-23-2011 05:15 PM

It is not a stain sealer. And if pigmented sealer is needed, Zin 123 is a great choice for many applications. But Gardz is (almost) unique and has its own place.
I use a 3/8 " roller too-start with a slow upstroke- brush thinly etc.
On real badly damaged rock i will really soak it, wipe away what ever doesn't penetrate.
Great stuff to have in the 'arsenal".

chrisn 09-24-2011 04:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 734724)
Here is what I use it for the most
#1!- after paper stripping and after paste has been cleaned
#2- spot priming mud - particularly when the finish is more than a flat
#3- to seal damaged sheetrock paper before mudding
#4- priming new sheetrock - again when finish is more than flat
#5- before hanging wallcoverings
#6- sealing the edge of tape so that paint doesn't creep underneath.


Yes to all the above:thumbsup:

Also try a micro fibre cover, you will never use anything else for Gardz
http://www.thepaintstore.com/ArroWor...ver_p/mfr2.htm

chrisn 09-24-2011 04:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by m1951mm (Post 734725)
When I use it I use a 1/4 nap roller and no pressing of the roller, strickly glide it. It is not one that you dip your brush and tap on the side to fill the brush, for a change this is one that you wipe some off the brush after dipping. (Please correct me if you think I am wrong Brush:).) I usually cut the top and roll very quickly after the cut in to keep the dripping down. It will not seal water damage, wood stain or other issues that will come back through a water borne product, but other than that, it is a good primer once you get the hang of using it.

Brush, you must type way faster than I, every time I go to answer you have already been there-----------Too funny

Try this instead
http://www.thepaintstore.com/ArroWor...ver_p/mfr2.htm

jsheridan 09-24-2011 05:34 AM

I recently made the attempt to use Gardz for the first time. However, time was an issue and the Gardz has a three hour recoat time, so I opted for the cover stain. Turns out the cs took almost the whole day to dry enough to spackle over. I'm wondering if applying it over the Roman 35 delayed the drying time. Anyway, haven't been doing much paper removal lately. Can it be tinted or does it come in a white?

Brushjockey 09-24-2011 07:35 AM

JS- Put a fan on it and i seldom have to wait over an hour.

It is clear- tint will just make it slightly visible.
I sometimes do the highly controversial act of adding paint to it. But not for holding back paste residue- just for general priming.

chrisn 09-24-2011 04:50 PM

You can paint over it in an hour with a fan blowing, easy.
Don't tell anybody, but as brush said, I have been known to mix some 123 into it, just to see where it was.:yes:


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