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Old 02-23-2013, 06:56 PM   #1
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Zinsser Bin


I have read that this stuff has sort of a learning curve. Is it because it's so thin and dries so quickly?

Also, would any "higher quality" brush work for application or is there a specific type/brand name of brush that works better with this product??

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Old 02-24-2013, 03:27 AM   #2
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I have read that this stuff has sort of a learning curve. Is it because it's so thin and dries so quickly?

Also, would any "higher quality" brush work for application or is there a specific type/brand name of brush that works better with this product??

yes and it smells very,very bad, use lots of ventilation

I always use an old brush and cover that gets pitched after.

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Old 02-24-2013, 07:46 AM   #3
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Why the Bin? What are you trying to prime?
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:16 AM   #4
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Though it makes a good one, it's probably not the best all purpose primer for an inexperienced brush hand. Unless you really need it I would suggest a good latex primer. You can always use it a spot primer under a full latex priming.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:49 AM   #5
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Why the Bin? What are you trying to prime?
I'll be painting all the trim around the doors and windows in a new (to us) house my wife and I will be closing on soon. It's very dark stained trim with a coat of poly (I'm assuming). My plan is to scuff the trim with some 220 sandpaper, hit it with a coat of BIN and follow that with two coats Benjamin Moore Super White Semi-Gloss white.

I've done quite a few painting projects over the years but have never used this stuff. When primer was needed on any previous painting projects I did, I always found Glidden Gripper did the trick. But with this being dark stained wood and the trim color change being so drastic I almost want to go the overkill route in terms of the primer so that this is a job I only have to do once.

Also, in terms of cleaning the trim after sanding. I've used an alcohol/water mix to clean body panels on cars where I have done painting/scratch repairs in the past. Would this same thing would work for this application?
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:56 AM   #6
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If you're using the BIN because of covering the color- not just getting adhesion -you will not be amazed. In fact- primers in general are not made to give coverage- thats what the paint does.
I would use an easier handling bonding primer and plan on 2 ( if your good) or 3 finish coats. I do this all the time and that is standard.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:29 AM   #7
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If you're using the BIN because of covering the color- not just getting adhesion -you will not be amazed. In fact- primers in general are not made to give coverage- thats what the paint does.
I would use an easier handling bonding primer and plan on 2 ( if your good) or 3 finish coats. I do this all the time and that is standard.

What would be an easier handling bonding primer I could use in place of the Bin?

I was only planning on using BIN because I was worried about the wood grain/knots bleeding through the primer and the paint. After doing some research on it, it appears that's one of BIN's strong points. Do I not need to be worried about that possibility in this case? Is it basically about adhesion when painting over dark trim more so that it is the dark stain/knots showing through??

Thanks for the help!!!
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:13 PM   #8
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I assume that there is more than just stain on the trim, also a varnish finish of some sort? If so- it probably has already taken care of any bleeding problems.
Bleeding is stains chemically coming through the paint, not just lack of coverage.
Personally I use BIN just where it is needed. On an already varnished trim I would clean ( Krud Kutter- Soilax- something that doesn't need alot of rinsing) sand lightly but thoroughly, wipe down with denatured alcohol, prime with any of the following- Stix, Zinsser 123, BM First Coat, SW has one- don't know the name. , Bondz, etc.
If something bleeds, hit that spot with the BIN.
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:39 PM   #9
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BJ, SW doesn't have any catchy names for its line of primers......
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:42 PM   #10
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Yes, but is that a bonding primer?
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:44 PM   #11
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I assume that there is more than just stain on the trim, also a varnish finish of some sort? If so- it probably has already taken care of any bleeding problems.
Bleeding is stains chemically coming through the paint, not just lack of coverage.
Personally I use BIN just where it is needed. On an already varnished trim I would clean ( Krud Kutter- Soilax- something that doesn't need alot of rinsing) sand lightly but thoroughly, wipe down with denatured alcohol, prime with any of the following- Stix, Zinsser 123, BM First Coat, SW has one- don't know the name. , Bondz, etc.
If something bleeds, hit that spot with the BIN.
Fresh Start?
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:47 PM   #12
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Fresh Start?
OOps, right. Fresh start.
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #13
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25 years ago when I started painting everyone I knew used a deglosser and Kilz to paint stained woodwork and cabinets.It never did bond well enough to handle the wear cabinet doors can get.
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:15 PM   #14
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Most waterborne primers say do not use deglossers with them. I think TSP ( or TSP Substitute, which I like better because they are no rinse) are OK I am pretty sure.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:43 PM   #15
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Thanks for the all the help! Love this forum.

So after reading all the posts, it looks as though the process should be as follows. Please let me know if this looks ok:

- Clean w TSP Substitute
- Lightly sand with 220 grit sandpaper
- Wipe with denatured alcohol
- Coat with Zinsser 123
- Two coats Benjamin Moore Super White Semi-Gloss White

Sound good?

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