Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-17-2012, 08:30 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada ( Seattle like weather)
Posts: 3
Share |
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


I have a 5 foot high 4 by 4 hard wood post on my roof (surrounded on all sides by shingles) that is very weathered. All paint has peeled off. The electric supply from the street connects to the top of this post and then the wires go into the house via a metal conduit.

How to I apply wood preservative and then paint it to seal out moisture, protect from sun, and seal in preservative? I'm thinking of using zinc naphathenate because I read it is paintable. Preventing rot and sealing out moisture are my keep objectives.


Last edited by gigahoo; 08-17-2012 at 08:32 PM.
gigahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2012, 08:51 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,196
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


Post a picture, does not seem like a very good way to support a power mast.

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 01:06 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada ( Seattle like weather)
Posts: 3
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


There is no need for a picture. Its was the standard for this neighbour hood 50 years ago. I had a carpenter reinforce it. Its good for another 50 years providing I protect the wood.
gigahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 01:36 AM   #4
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


I think Joe is building a DIY Chatroom photo album and needs a photo of absolutely everything for it to be complete.

In theory, you should be able to paint zinc napthenate within 24 hours of it drying completely with a solvent based (oil) paint product. I wouldn't use waterbased primer and paint. I would think about using a couple coats of solid stain rather than primer and paint.

However, to get the protection properties you want and on an existing post you cannot soak, you should mix the material with a recommended solvent/penetrant per label instructions. You will want to build up several coats of the preservative and to the point---if you can---that the post will just not absorb any more. You will then have to give the solvents in what you applied time to evaporate and the material itself time to dry.

It is hard to say how long this will take as it depends on climate at time of application, type of wood and its absorbancy, etc. If you rush the process you will have a gooey mess and/or total adhesion failure.

A company I designed for used to treat lodgepole pine fence posts and tree stakes in a bath of diesel fluid and copper napthenate. How fast it soaked in and dried was totally dependent on the moisture content of the wood. We usually only soaked the earth ends of posts as the stuff was bright green but occasionally did whole section of rail fencing at customer request. It stained nicely with darker color, oil-based, semi-transparent, semi-solid, or solid stains once dry.

Zinc napthenate is more neutral as I remember so you will not have the green color to overcome.

As an aside, you might want to update your profile with basic geographic information so we know where you are and what weather is like near you when answering your posts.

Last edited by user1007; 08-18-2012 at 01:46 AM.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 02:03 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada ( Seattle like weather)
Posts: 3
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


You said: <<I wouldn't use waterbased primer and paint. I would think about using a couple coats of solid stain rather than primer and paint. >>

As I already just purchased water based acrylic because its supposed to breathe better than oil based, but not purchased the primer, this advice gives me pause. So I'm thinking of now purchasing a solid stain as a primer, and if possible with the arcrylic paint.

I am also thinking of going to a local marine supply store for general advice.

Thanks.
gigahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 02:12 AM   #6
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


Vancouver is so beautiful even with its growing pains. I almost moved there many years ago and even before Seattle took off. I commuted on a regular basis from the San Francisco Bay Area to Seattle, into Idaho and up toward you. I never cared if I missed a flight home!

Visiting the marine supply place is a great idea. They will certainly have ideas about wood preservation and painting.

If you have waterbased paint already, I would think about tinting some solvent based alkyd primer to go under it and hope for the best. See what the marina folks say though. I don't think you want to risk a waterbased product directly over the preservative.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2012, 03:17 AM   #7
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,689
Default

Zinc naphathenate preservative: how paintable is it?


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester;991372[COLOR=red
]I think Joe is building a DIY Chatroom photo album and needs a photo of absolutely everything for it to be complete. [/COLOR]

In theory, you should be able to paint zinc napthenate within 24 hours of it drying completely with a solvent based (oil) paint product. I wouldn't use waterbased primer and paint. I would think about using a couple coats of solid stain rather than primer and paint.

However, to get the protection properties you want and on an existing post you cannot soak, you should mix the material with a recommended solvent/penetrant per label instructions. You will want to build up several coats of the preservative and to the point---if you can---that the post will just not absorb any more. You will then have to give the solvents in what you applied time to evaporate and the material itself time to dry.

It is hard to say how long this will take as it depends on climate at time of application, type of wood and its absorbancy, etc. If you rush the process you will have a gooey mess and/or total adhesion failure.

A company I designed for used to treat lodgepole pine fence posts and tree stakes in a bath of diesel fluid and copper napthenate. How fast it soaked in and dried was totally dependent on the moisture content of the wood. We usually only soaked the earth ends of posts as the stuff was bright green but occasionally did whole section of rail fencing at customer request. It stained nicely with darker color, oil-based, semi-transparent, semi-solid, or solid stains once dry.

Zinc napthenate is more neutral as I remember so you will not have the green color to overcome.

As an aside, you might want to update your profile with basic geographic information so we know where you are and what weather is like near you when answering your posts.

good one!

chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Okay to wash wood treated with jasco termin-8 wood preservative? darsunt Painting 1 12-29-2009 03:02 PM
Do zinc strips prevent black algae AFTER algae removed? unclej Roofing/Siding 1 08-18-2008 05:29 PM
regular zinc coated steel hardware with ACQ treated lumber dumbunusedid Building & Construction 3 08-12-2008 07:20 PM
new cedar roof and zinc advice garym112 Roofing/Siding 1 01-18-2006 06:25 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.