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Old 10-29-2013, 11:18 PM   #1
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


I work for another painter and let's just say he doesn't do things (or have me do them) the way I would want them to be done. But he pays me and in the end it's his name on the project. However, I'm starting to go out on my own and have a few small projects lined up.

One of the things he does is recoat as soon as the paint is dry to touch. He says there's no money in painting so we need to get the jobs done ASAP. So, I understand WHY he does it, but it's something I won't do for my own projects.

I am wondering, do all the pros here follow recoat times to the letter? Most latex/acrylic paints I have seen have four hour recoat times. If you have a small project (e.g. just a bathroom for a customer), do you just come back the next day to put the second coat on? Obviously if you have multiple rooms to paint there is no issue. But if not, how do you get the job done most efficiently?

Looks like BM Regal Select and Aura have 1-2 hour recoat times, depending upon sheen. What other quality paints have fast recoat times?

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Old 10-30-2013, 10:18 AM   #2
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Each person in business for themselves is free to perform the work as they see fit. If you prefer to come back later you can, and if your employer wants to second coat when the first coat is dry, he can. Each has to equally stand behind their work. With more experience with each product you learn when the second coat can be applied without adverse affects.
Dry times are always the bane of small jobs whether it be for cutting in colors against each other or second coats. The recommended dry times on the cans are more like guidelines, since the manufacturer can not predict humidity and temperature at your location.
I have not had any issues with the second coat going on soon after the first coat has dried, except for oil base paint, which is a non issue in California since it has virtually disappeared here.

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Old 10-30-2013, 04:57 PM   #3
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


I use my discretion, but also know what to expect since i normally use the same products. manufacturer guidelines you will find are usually very much on the conservative side. I dont have a problem applying 2 coats in 1 day with any wall paint that i use, but you will still need an idea of what you are looking at in your situations.
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Old 10-30-2013, 05:02 PM   #4
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Fans change the whole equation.
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:24 PM   #5
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Fans change the whole equation.
yes fans are a must in fact always have an extra fan redy to go .last winter my fan broke ,and I had a hard time finding one.
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Old 10-30-2013, 11:49 PM   #6
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Anyone telling you there is no money in painting is full of crap. I worked for one company that kept trying to cry broke all the time yet with 2 owners they were always too busy to come pick up the checks from customers. Hint to business owners, your employees can do simple math. On a typical job they would crying foul if 4 people were there longer than 1.5 days. 48 man hours, $3400 and they were crying foul. That's $70 per person per hour. Give me a freakin break, and that is not uncommon. A lot of their employees were making $8 and $10 per hour.

I have seen the exact opposite too. I worked for one lady where it was just me and her on a job for two whole days. Total cost of the job was $280 and she bought 1/2 the paint. I even asked her what the hell she was doing, she made a whopping $40 in 2 days. Needless to say the last week I worked for her was when she called me up telling me to wait a few days before cashing her check. C-YA.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:28 AM   #7
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Anyone who says there is no money in painting is either lying or an extremely poor business person, in fact if that is true they are doing it as a hobby not a business.
As for the drying times we all fudge most times we can get away with it, sometimes it bites us in the butt. I have found with the new paint formulas out now I read the can and if possible try (remember try) to do as recommended.
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Old 10-31-2013, 09:15 AM   #8
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


The key to following drying time instructions is to properly BUDGET your time. In other words, if time is of the essence I paint a room that is prepped and ready to go. I put a fan in there to speed the drying process if the job is a "hurry up" job and then go prep another room or two. If it's not a pressing time issue, I may let the first room dry OVER NIGHT and recoat it in the morning. Most pro painters have the process of efficiency down to a science so that no time is wasted and profits can be relatively high. It's just a matter of figuring out the ORDER that works best for you so that you are busy and not standing around waiting for a room to dry to get that second coat on.
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Old 10-31-2013, 10:34 AM   #9
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Completely agree on organizing steps . This is def what is the main difference between a pro and DIY. Everyday I am ordering my activities so there is no wasted time, thinking about how what I do today will set up tomorrow to go smoothly and efficiently.
And this only comes from experience in repeating the steps often enough to know how long something takes, and having very good knowledge about what products when will help do this.
That is one of the reasons for such dedication to a particular brand or line of paint. Knowing exactly what to expect out of it.
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Old 10-31-2013, 11:19 PM   #10
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Work Efficiency and Recoat Times


Thanks everyone. I really appreciate the input. I know that a lot of times we have recoated prematurely because of the way my brush behaved on the barely dried coat...almost rewetting but not quite. I just want to make sure I do things absolutely the right way when the jobs are mine.

We finished a pretty big job today and I just didn't feel any sense of pride over the work. A lot of it was rush, rush, rush and there wasn't really any particular part of the house I could call my own because someone else would do the second cut in, etc. I barely even get to use the brushes I like because my 2.5" angled Alpha is called a "tinker toy" and I'm supposed to graduate to using a 3" brush for just about everything because it holds more paint and gets the job done "faster".

Anyway, I've read that you should always follow manufacturer recommendations to a T so I just wanted to see what you guys do for smaller jobs to keep the work flowing.

I'll be posting a lot of questions here and I just want to say thanks in advance for all of the time you long-time pros take to help others. There is a wealth of knowledge here and I've got a LOT to learn.

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