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Old 04-26-2010, 03:18 PM   #1
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


I'm rehabbing my sunroom and all of the trim (windows and baseboards) were painted white. I've stripped paint before, but this time I decided to remove the trim to strip it. I made stripping them a whole lot easier, but since I had to remove nails and pull them off the walls, there was a good amount of damage done to the trim (i.e., large nail holes, nicks, etc). I used wood filler and a little bondo to fill in the imperfections, neither took the stain very well. I've stained the trim and applied 1 coat of poly on them, imho, they look like crap. Any suggestions on how I could fix it? That is, without having to replace the trim. The house is 105 years old and it's the original trim.

Jesse

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Old 04-26-2010, 04:50 PM   #2
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Paint it.

It's paint grade wood. it was never meant to be clear-coated.

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Old 04-26-2010, 06:02 PM   #3
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Most of the trims from that era were birch, That is a blotchy wood to stain when new--it's a labor of love to strip and sand the old trims--with no guarantee of success.

Can you post a picture?---Mike---
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Old 04-26-2010, 08:40 PM   #4
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Most of the trims from that era were birch, That is a blotchy wood to stain when new--it's a labor of love to strip and sand the old trims--with no guarantee of success.

Can you post a picture?---Mike---
Here are some pictures. I'm not sure what kind of wood it is, but I'm pretty sure it's red all the way through. I know this because I accidentally broke a piece when I took it off. What do you guys think?

Jesse
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_1.jpg   Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_2.jpg  
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Old 04-26-2010, 09:42 PM   #5
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


That's fir. You can't beat the color of aged fir. If that is an example of your work--I think you are being to hard on your self---I like the look-nice.---Mike---
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Old 04-26-2010, 09:54 PM   #6
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


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Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
That's fir. You can't beat the color of aged fir. If that is an example of your work--I think you are being to hard on your self---I like the look-nice.---Mike---
I appreciate your compliments Oh'mike, but take a look at these pics. Does this change your mind at all? I've been working awfully hard on this room and I'm seriously considering repainting the trim.

Jesse
Attached Thumbnails
Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_3.jpg   Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_4.jpg   Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_5.jpg   Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad.  Suggestions?-sunroom_trim_6.jpg  
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Old 04-27-2010, 12:45 AM   #7
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


That fir is gorgeous and it looks like you are doing a pretty good job, but you are doing things in the wrong order. Also, Bondo is absolutely the wrong product for this project. Strip the paint, stain the wood, clear coat it once - then get stainable wood putty and add a little stain to the putty so that it matches the wood then fill the holes. If you try to fill before the clear coat, the oil from the putty will penetrate the wood and leave marks like in picture #2. Lightly sand the filled spot and clear coat again. Also don't be too hard on your finished product. Regardless of how careful you are in your restoration, the trim will always look beaten up and a bit ratty, but that is a huge part of the charm.

Your window casings look just like mine.

Last edited by Windows; 04-27-2010 at 12:50 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 04-27-2010, 01:03 AM   #8
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


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That fir is gorgeous and it looks like you are doing a pretty good job, but you are doing things in the wrong order. Also, Bondo is absolutely the wrong product for this project. Strip the paint, stain the wood, clear coat it once - then get stainable wood putty and add a little stain to the putty so that it matches the wood then fill the holes. If you try to fill before the clear coat, the oil from the putty will penetrate the wood and leave marks like in picture #2. Lightly sand the filled spot and clear coat again. Also don't be too hard on your finished product. Regardless of how careful you are in your restoration, the trim will always look beaten up and a bit ratty, but that is a huge part of the charm.

Your window casings look just like mine.
Wow, ok, I never knew that. I used bondo because I read an article online about this family that restored wood in their house and they said they used bondo because it took the stain better. What I've done so far is strip the paint, one coat of stain and one coat of poly. The only problem is that I applied the wood filler before I stained and poly'ed.

It looks like I may be in a good position here. So tell me if I'm right for what I should do next.

1. Lightly sand the wood surface (220 grit?)
2. Mix stain with stainable wood putty and apply putty to needed areas.
3. Sand
4. Add another coat of poly.

Also, is there any particular type of wood putty you would recommend? I've heard epoxy based wood fillers are good, but I've never used them. If you have a link, that would be great! Thanks!

Jesse
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Old 04-27-2010, 06:07 AM   #9
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Windows advice is tried and true.
Clear coat first then fill---other wise the filler will leave blotches--it clogs the pores of the wood and stops the stain and clear coat from penetrating evenly.

You will have to learn to 'fake' in the bondo patches---Buy a small set of artists oil paints--
Do you have a Hobby Lobby or other craft store near by?

With a little experimenting you should be able to make those repaired spots blend in nicely--
Use several colors and a bit of thinner and apply the colors with a brush --or your finger tip--or whatever works --

Years ago I rebuilt a few staircases in antique houses--the artist oils really helped blend the old and the new--and hide a lot of patches.

---Mike--
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:22 AM   #10
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Windows advice is tried and true.
Clear coat first then fill---other wise the filler will leave blotches--it clogs the pores of the wood and stops the stain and clear coat from penetrating evenly.

You will have to learn to 'fake' in the bondo patches---Buy a small set of artists oil paints--
Do you have a Hobby Lobby or other craft store near by?

With a little experimenting you should be able to make those repaired spots blend in nicely--
Use several colors and a bit of thinner and apply the colors with a brush --or your finger tip--or whatever works --

Years ago I rebuilt a few staircases in antique houses--the artist oils really helped blend the old and the new--and hide a lot of patches.

---Mike--
Yes there is a hobby store nearby. You're saying use oil paint, matched to the stain color, only for the bondo patches? Will this work on wood filler that has already been applied and has a coat of poly on it?

Jesse
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:30 AM   #11
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Also, this is the wood filler that I've been using. It's not putty.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_8374-69-1173136_0_?productId=3060041&Ntt=wood%20filler&Ntk =i_products&Ns=p_product_price|1&pl=1&currentURL=/pl__0__s?Ntk=i_products$rpp=15$No=45$Ntt=wood%20fi ller$Ns=p_product_price|1$identifier=

Jesse
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Old 04-28-2010, 01:46 AM   #12
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jpearson311 View Post
Wow, ok, I never knew that. I used bondo because I read an article online about this family that restored wood in their house and they said they used bondo because it took the stain better. What I've done so far is strip the paint, one coat of stain and one coat of poly. The only problem is that I applied the wood filler before I stained and poly'ed.

It looks like I may be in a good position here. So tell me if I'm right for what I should do next.

1. Lightly sand the wood surface (220 grit?)
2. Mix stain with stainable wood putty and apply putty to needed areas.
3. Sand
4. Add another coat of poly.

Also, is there any particular type of wood putty you would recommend? I've heard epoxy based wood fillers are good, but I've never used them. If you have a link, that would be great! Thanks!

Jesse
Sorry I can't help you with the type of wood putty, but i would think most stainable & sandable puttys would be fine. I am using a two part wood epoxy on some of my window sashes these days, and that would probably be overkill for your project. Unless you have a structural deficiency or need to be able to saw and plane it, I would stick with putty. As for the order, I would probably (1) use 220 grit to sand through the clear coat and remove the bondo mark and some of the applied stain. Then (2) touch up the spot lightly with stain (rag it off quickly and repeat if necessary), (3) touch up with clear coat, and (4) fill with stained putty. (5) Apply final coat of clear coat to entire window. Good luck!

Edit: interesting about the Bondo. I have used it and seen it used on many interior paint grade jobs. I had no idea that it could be used for stain work.

Last edited by Windows; 04-28-2010 at 01:48 AM.
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Old 04-28-2010, 07:21 AM   #13
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


After you do your 'False graining' with the oils--you will need to put another coat of clear on top to get an even sheen.---You will want to play with this a bit--I think you will make the bad spots very acceptable.--Mike--
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:20 AM   #14
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Windows View Post
Sorry I can't help you with the type of wood putty, but i would think most stainable & sandable puttys would be fine. I am using a two part wood epoxy on some of my window sashes these days, and that would probably be overkill for your project. Unless you have a structural deficiency or need to be able to saw and plane it, I would stick with putty. As for the order, I would probably (1) use 220 grit to sand through the clear coat and remove the bondo mark and some of the applied stain. Then (2) touch up the spot lightly with stain (rag it off quickly and repeat if necessary), (3) touch up with clear coat, and (4) fill with stained putty. (5) Apply final coat of clear coat to entire window. Good luck!

Edit: interesting about the Bondo. I have used it and seen it used on many interior paint grade jobs. I had no idea that it could be used for stain work.
Ok sounds good. This is what I'll be doing this weekend . I read that you don't sand wood putty though. Is this true?

Jesse
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:57 AM   #15
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Wooden window trim that I stripped looks bad. Suggestions?


if you have some scraps that you can cut up you can make your own filler with wood glue & sawdust. otherwise i think they look like 100 year old window trim pieces the character of the materials is what makes old houses cool in the first place.

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