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Old 10-20-2008, 09:14 AM   #1
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Why backroll?


I have read that when spraying latex wall/ceiling paint that someone should follow behind and "backroll" the paint. Is backrolling necessary and what does it do? Is it necessary to backroll the primer also? Is backrolling just a quick once over with the roller? Just need to know before I screw something up and have to redo it. Thanks for your input.

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Old 10-20-2008, 10:36 AM   #2
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Why backroll?


It helps the primer work in better and gives it a little tecture. You really only have to do that with the primer.

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Old 10-20-2008, 10:36 AM   #3
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Why backroll?


When you backroll, procedurally it's nothing more than just following up behind the sprayer with a roller on a frame I like to use 1/2" nap roller. The difference obviously is that the paint is already on the surface, and all you have to do is run the roller through it. But don't be mistaken by it's ease...you still have to have good technique meaning don't leave lines or roller marks, not too heavy of a touch, etc.

Back rolling helps to even out the spray coat applied product whether it be primer or paint, and if it's drywall primer in new construction it helps to lay down the drywall paper fuzz. FWIW I back roll all sprayed paint, I think it leaves a more uniform appearance.
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Old 10-20-2008, 05:07 PM   #4
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Why backroll?


I don't spray paint, but I've been told the reason for backrolling is that a sprayer simply doesn't force the primer into intimate contact with the porous surface of the paper or joint compound the way a brush or roller does. You need the wet primer to be "pressed" against the porous surface for good adhesion.

Apparantly, the problems you get if you don't backroll are related to poor adhesion cuz just spraying the primer on doesn't press it against the substrate with sufficient force to get it to properly "wet" the surface of the drywall paper or joint compound for proper adhesion.
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Old 10-20-2008, 07:17 PM   #5
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Why backroll?


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Originally Posted by RippySkippy View Post
Back rolling helps to even out the spray coat applied product whether it be primer or paint, and if it's drywall primer in new construction it helps to lay down the drywall paper fuzz. FWIW I back roll all sprayed paint, I think it leaves a more uniform appearance.
I agree. I use a 1/2 nap roller 18" for drywall
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Old 10-20-2008, 11:36 PM   #6
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Why backroll?


Whatever you do DO NOT SPRAY THE PRIMER. I am in the process of removing paint and sprayed on primer from several rooms (walls and ceilings!) The primer was sprayed on and now the paint and primer comes off in sheets. The primer just didn't adhere. It was a HUGE mistake, so take it from someone who has a massive problem on her hands, not to mention $ down the drain. Timesaving sounds great sometimes, but stay away from the temptation. It's not worth it in the end.
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Old 10-21-2008, 08:17 AM   #7
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Why backroll?


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Originally Posted by dorothyolive View Post
...DO NOT SPRAY THE PRIMER....
There's must be other issues at play with your situation. Tossing a blanket warning saying spraying causes the paint to come off is not warranted for a practice that is fully accepted in the industry.
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Old 10-21-2008, 03:25 PM   #8
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Why backroll?


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Originally Posted by dorothyolive View Post
Whatever you do DO NOT SPRAY THE PRIMER. I am in the process of removing paint and sprayed on primer from several rooms (walls and ceilings!) The primer was sprayed on and now the paint and primer comes off in sheets. The primer just didn't adhere. It was a HUGE mistake, so take it from someone who has a massive problem on her hands, not to mention $ down the drain. Timesaving sounds great sometimes, but stay away from the temptation. It's not worth it in the end.
DorothyOlive
I spray ceilings and closets all the time with primer then a finish. It was not the spraying of primer that gave you these problems. You had some kind of reason why it did not adhere. Could of been something on you walls. If the season was different i would maybe say that your walls were to cold. Without much info it is hard to say what went wrong.
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:14 PM   #9
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Why backroll?


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Originally Posted by Workaholic View Post
I spray ceilings and closets all the time with primer then a finish. It was not the spraying of primer that gave you these problems. You had some kind of reason why it did not adhere. Could of been something on you walls. If the season was different i would maybe say that your walls were to cold. Without much info it is hard to say what went wrong.
Hi Sean,
I have a thread with my issue under "spray primer Kilz Latex now all finish paint is soft..." on this site. All opinions are being taken into consideration and tested prior to my repainting. If you have time check it out. I haven't come to a conclusion yet but I'm still in the testing phase.
Thanks
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Old 10-25-2008, 12:36 AM   #10
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Why backroll?


I have sprayed hundreds of new homes over the years and have never backrolled save a few times because the builder requested it. The most important thing to remember when spraying paint is that some paints are better for spraying than others when it comes to new drywall. While spraying can cause the drywall to "fuzz" up this is do to the sanding of the drywall compound prior to painting, If you pole sand all surfaces between first and second coat you will eliminate virtually all "fuzz". Sounds like alot however any able bodied person should be able to sand all walls and ceilings in a standard house in about 2 hours. If you are lucky enough to follow a real good drywaller that sponges all his joints , no need to sand. also depending on the paint that is used you can do touch up with a brush and it will blend in, whereas using the backroll technique you usually have to touch up with a roller. As for spraying a primer, unless you are just calling your first coat a primer than o.k but as for using a seperate paint for your first coat and then applying a finish coat, a waste of time in most situations unless trying to go from oil to latex or a few other situations than obviously you would need a primer. But why not save time and money and just put on two heavy coats of your finish paint
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Old 10-25-2008, 01:57 PM   #11
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Why backroll?


Think of a sprayer as a machine gun. It shoot micro drops of paint on the wall, and with the pressure behind the machine it will have "overspray". These micro drops do not hit ever bit of surface you are trying to spray. So the darker the color, the more you will see through the paint. So on the finish coat you do need to backroll, this will fill all the voids the sprayer can not fill. Duane @ Color Wheel Paints and Coatings, Gainesville Florida.
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Old 10-25-2008, 10:09 PM   #12
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Why backroll?


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Originally Posted by Duane Foster View Post
Think of a sprayer as a machine gun. It shoot micro drops of paint on the wall, and with the pressure behind the machine it will have "overspray". These micro drops do not hit ever bit of surface you are trying to spray. So the darker the color, the more you will see through the paint.
So how come I can cover a surface completely with paint from a can of spray paint then? In fact, sometimes if I'm not careful, I spray too much and the paint sags on the surface I'm painting before it dries, making an ugly mess. So, my spray paint is sagging on the surface I'm painting, and you're telling me I still haven't covered the surface completely with paint. I need to back roll to spread the paint over all the unpainted areas? What gives?

Quote:
So on the finish coat you do need to backroll, this will fill all the voids the sprayer can not fill.
Why don't they backroll when spray painting cars then?

When I've seen cars being spray painted, the spray seems to cover the surface completely with NO unpainted areas (regardless of how small they are). I don't see why you'd get unpainted areas on drywall if you don't get them when spray painting a car.

Please explain where my thinking is wrong on this. How come I can spray paint something myself with a can of spray paint and cover it completely with paint, and a guy spray painting a car can do the same, and they can spray varnish onto furniture and cover it completely, but a professional painter spraying latex paint can't do that so you need some monkey to follow him with a roller to backroll the paint to cover the drywall entirely. Huh? Does not compute. Does not compute. Does not compute. Does not compute.

What am I missing here? If everyone else can do it, including me, why can't a professional painter spray latex paint on a wall and cover the wall completely?

Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 10-26-2008 at 12:08 AM.
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Old 10-26-2008, 11:20 AM   #13
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Why backroll?


"Does not compute..."

Nestor, backrolling seems to be a preferred method used by some professional painters, others not. And I'm sure they have their reasons...but does it have to make sense to you in order for them to do it?

Backrolling a spray-painted car, on the other hand, makes no sense whatsoever and you know why. So why call everyone out on this?
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Old 10-26-2008, 01:28 PM   #14
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Why backroll?


Yeah, Carlisle, I guess I went a bit overboard on that one. I was pretty plastered when I posted that, so that's probably why.

Things don't have to make sense to me before I can accept that other people do them. 1.3 billion people using chopsticks to eat rice is a perfect example.

In this case, I just wanted the poster who used the machine gun analogy for a paint sprayer to question his explanation that the purpose of backrolling is to ensure that the surface to be painted is completely covered with paint. I thought if he realized that other things that get spray painted get covered completely with paint, it would occur to him that the purpose of backrolling wasn't to get that 100% coverage.

In my kitchen I have two refridgerators. One contains food while the other contains two stainless steel cylinders and a cast steel cylinder. The cast steel cylinder contains liquid CO2 at a pressure of about 700 psi, and the stainless steel cylinders contain home made beer. That fridge allows me to have cool carbonated beer on tap 24/7. As long as my posts occasionally sound like I'm bouncing off the walls in a rubber room, you can be sure that both fridges are working properly.
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Old 10-26-2008, 03:06 PM   #15
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Why backroll?


LOL... gotcha...

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