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Old 05-13-2013, 09:05 PM   #1
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When you use oil...


I've never used oil on trim but I know a lot of you pros swear by it. When I paint, I usually do all the trim and doors first, that way I don't have to be so precise where the trim meets the walls since I will cover up any trim paint on the walls when I cut in with the wall paint. But I do either tape the baseboard and chair rail or just paint it after I roll the walls since it will get roller splatter on it.

My question is, if you use oil for the trim and latex for the walls, do you do the walls first and then paint the trim? Because I'm assuming if you paint trim first and get any trim paint on the walls, you'll have adhesion issues with the wall paint going over oil.

So what's your methodology?

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Old 05-13-2013, 09:28 PM   #2
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When you use oil...


Same- trim first. Don't overpaint too much , maybe hit with a sanding sponge to give a little tooth to the overage-

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Old 05-14-2013, 05:41 AM   #3
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Well, I am in the minority when it comes to this. I paint the walls first, then carefully cut in the trim. It is just the way I have always done it.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:44 AM   #4
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When you use oil...


Not sure I would race to use an oil product on trim anymore. You can achieve the same look with quality acrylics and not risk the discoloration and chalking. Ben Moore has the new waterborne alkyd people seem to really like. I think it is Advance? You should not attempt an oil finish over the top a latex acrylic without something like an alkyd primer/underlay first.

As far as sequence, I usually did trim first since it was easier to cut in to it than cutting the trim in to the wall.

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Old 05-14-2013, 08:10 AM   #5
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When you use oil...


I'm with SD on this one. The oils yellow so much over time that your WHITE woodwork will look like smoker's nicotine stains after a few years. Although, SW's Proclassic can be tricky to use, I like how it levels out to a hard, glossy sheen on woodwork & trim.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:13 AM   #6
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I'm not planning on doing it, I was just wondering how I would go about it if I did and was wondering how the pros did it. I really can't imagine doing crown moulding after the walls. At least on mine, the lower edge of it is like 1/8". It would be really tough not to get any on the walls.

Yes...BM's waterborne alkyd is Advance. They say Advance stays white "longer" than traditional alkyds. SW also has ProClassic in a waterborne alkyd, which they claim is "non-yellowing." But, even though the delivery system is waterborne, in the end -- when it dries -- it is still an alkyd, and thus an "oil", is it not? So, regardless of the delivery system, if you're painting over an alkyd with latex, I would think you would still need to scuff and prime.

Now, unlike Brushjockey, when I am painting anything that borders the walls -- trim or even just the ceiling -- I m not careful at all. Whatever paint gets on the walls is feathered onto the walls. So when I'm done with ceilings and trim, you basically see a brush-width thin layer of trim paint all the way around the trim and ceiling. So -- IF I were to use oil, I'd really have to change my tactics or I'd be doing a lot of scuffing before putting down the wall paint.

On a related note, I didn't even realize SW's PC came in a waterborne alkyd. I got 3 cans of the PC (untinted) during one of their sales and they gave me two latex and one waterborne alkyd. I never noticed. I painted the kid's bath with the alkyd (just the way I normally do, with lots o' trim paint on the walls) then hit the walls with two coats of Duration Satin. That was about two months ago. Didn't notice any adhesion issues with the wall paint when cutting in and today still looks fine. I suspect I may have some issues down the road, though.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:14 AM   #7
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When you use oil...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
I'm with SD on this one. The oils yellow so much over time that your WHITE woodwork will look like smoker's nicotine stains after a few years. Although, SW's Proclassic can be tricky to use, I like how it levels out to a hard, glossy sheen on woodwork & trim.
Which ProClassic are you talking about? Latex?
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:20 AM   #8
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When you use oil...


There is a difference in a true oil ( like BM's Oil Impervo) and the waterborne oils ( like BM's Advance.) there is not an adhesion problem ( particularly before cure) so much with the WB to acrylic .
I think most of us were assuming you were asking about a true oil.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:29 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
There is a difference in a true oil ( like BM's Oil Impervo) and the waterborne oils ( like BM's Advance.) there is not an adhesion problem ( particularly before cure) so much with the WB to acrylic .
I think most of us were assuming you were asking about a true oil.
I was. The latter was a rabbit trail. When I'm painting I think about a lot of things and wonder how y'all do it. Like when you pour paint from paint cans and you know you'll have leftover paint to store. If you pour it from the can, you get it in the rim and, even after brushing it out, it will cause the can to rust over time. So do you use one of those silly snap-on pour thingies like I do? They are a pain because you have to snap on, pour, snap off and rinse it before putting the lid back on the can. Not a big deal if you're not having to refresh your cutting bucket or roller tray often. But if you're having to refresh your cutting bucket often, it's a pain. It sure does keep the rim CLEAN though!

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Old 05-14-2013, 09:34 AM   #10
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When you use oil...


Advance by BM , here is a review I wrote in Jan 12
http://www.shearerpainting.com/blog/...rwin-williams/
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:14 AM   #11
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When you use oil...


There are problems putting any oil paint over a surface that has been painted latex. It has been known to peel up the old latex underneath it. Primers don't count.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:15 PM   #12
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When you use oil...


Quote:
Originally Posted by 7.62 View Post
Which ProClassic are you talking about? Latex?
Yes, the PC latex.........

As for storing paint, I don't worry too much about any rust from the can or debris that gets into the can because I strain the paint if it has sat for any length of time. That eliminates any crap that gets into your paint can.

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Old 05-14-2013, 05:31 PM   #13
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When you use oil...


Quote:
Originally Posted by 7.62 View Post
I was. The latter was a rabbit trail. When I'm painting I think about a lot of things and wonder how y'all do it. Like when you pour paint from paint cans and you know you'll have leftover paint to store. If you pour it from the can, you get it in the rim and, even after brushing it out, it will cause the can to rust over time. So do you use one of those silly snap-on pour thingies like I do? They are a pain because you have to snap on, pour, snap off and rinse it before putting the lid back on the can. Not a big deal if you're not having to refresh your cutting bucket or roller tray often. But if you're having to refresh your cutting bucket often, it's a pain. It sure does keep the rim CLEAN though!

Any paint that is that old to get rusty should be pitched anyway
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:33 PM   #14
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When you use oil...


I get Impervo and Impervex mixed in my mind so have to check the can. Both are great, gloss products but one is waterbased. Both are Ben Moore products.

Those paint pouring things are alright but do take a few minutes to put in place. Years ago I saw someone recommend drilling a few holes around the rim for the paint to drip through into the can. Never tried it.

I find it just as fast to pour, catch the excess with a utility brush (I save one past its prime for anything else for such things) I don't have to race to clean. Then run a damp rag---water or mineral spirits---around the rim and the lid should fit with no problems getting it back off. So long as you USE A PAINT KEY and not a screwdriver in the first place. I like this kind and have a bunch. I used to have one on my keyring but the guys that run security machines are not so wild about them as I am. The ones with bottle openers work fine too.

Always decant leftover paint into the smallest container you have on hand to minimize airspace. Saran wrap over latex will help if you plan to store it for any length of time or they sell gimmicky plastic things to fit different cans. Always strain paint that has been sitting. I don't like working from a can of original paint unless I know I am going to use the whole amount.
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