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BlaJoRon 10-23-2011 09:13 PM

What will last?
 
I have a shabby looking basement and I want to start fixing it up. It has a peeling coat of paint on it right now and I was wondering how a textured coat would look. My basement is damp but not wet, so is a primer good then maybe a textured paint or is a basement water sealer a must if it is a damp basement wall? Thanks for any replies.

kkeith 10-24-2011 08:34 AM

For unfinished below grade cement, I would only use UGL Drylock as a sealer and finish. Use this link to check out the product: http://www.ugl.com/drylokMasonry/mas...ofer/latex.php
I have used it and it will help to eliminate the moisture, but I would not trust it to completely seal out moisture leakage because of possible pinholes in the finish, and the moisture barrier really needs to be on the outside of the wall. Because of possible continued moisture issues I would stay away from any texturing afterward, but the room will look a lot better and brighter with this coating on it.

BlaJoRon 10-24-2011 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkeith (Post 755474)
For unfinished below grade cement, I would only use UGL Drylock as a sealer and finish. Use this link to check out the product: http://www.ugl.com/drylokMasonry/mas...ofer/latex.php
I have used it and it will help to eliminate the moisture, but I would not trust it to completely seal out moisture leakage because of possible pinholes in the finish, and the moisture barrier really needs to be on the outside of the wall. Because of possible continued moisture issues I would stay away from any texturing afterward, but the room will look a lot better and brighter with this coating on it.

Thanks kkeith, I am going to take your advice on the product.

jsheridan 10-24-2011 11:58 AM

Ron, Drylok only works over bare masonry, and is ineffective over paint. I think KKeith missed that point, it happens. The peeling paint you suffer is probably due to the moisture pass through. If it peels down to bare masonry, you could use Drylok on the bare spots. However, the moisture may go around that, leaving you with new, non previous peeling areas. It's a tough spot. How bad is the peeling, % wise, and does the peeling go down to the bare surface?

kkeith 10-24-2011 07:20 PM

Sorry, yes I was thinking of bare cement. No coating placed on top can make the existing paint stick better.

user1007 10-24-2011 07:34 PM

Before we go further, what kind of material is in your basement? Is there any kind of surface coat of material or is it raw masonry, concrete, concrete block, rough plaster coat, etc. Any guesses how long the paint on it now has been there?

BlaJoRon 10-30-2011 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 755645)
Ron, Drylok only works over bare masonry, and is ineffective over paint. I think KKeith missed that point, it happens. The peeling paint you suffer is probably due to the moisture pass through. If it peels down to bare masonry, you could use Drylok on the bare spots. However, the moisture may go around that, leaving you with new, non previous peeling areas. It's a tough spot. How bad is the peeling, % wise, and does the peeling go down to the bare surface?


The peeling is bad, like 90% peeled.

BlaJoRon 10-30-2011 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 756030)
Before we go further, what kind of material is in your basement? Is there any kind of surface coat of material or is it raw masonry, concrete, concrete block, rough plaster coat, etc. Any guesses how long the paint on it now has been there?


It is just concrete block and I have been living here for 7 years so it has been like that at least that long.

kkeith 10-30-2011 06:59 PM

Then it sounds to me like my original solution might be best. Be sure to try to scrape off any remaining paint to save yourself some work in the future. If there is any efflorescence, ie. salt like residue that comes out and dries on the cement surface, be sure to wire brush that off and follow any other instructions on the can. If there is actual visible water leaking through holes in the wall, those spots can be sealed with another cement like plug made by the same company. The remaining 10% of original paint may come off in the future, but those can be touched up with the Drylock, which should give you the best results.

BlaJoRon 10-30-2011 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkeith (Post 760376)
Then it sounds to me like my original solution might be best. Be sure to try to scrape off any remaining paint to save yourself some work in the future. If there is any efflorescence, ie. salt like residue that comes out and dries on the cement surface, be sure to wire brush that off and follow any other instructions on the can. If there is actual visible water leaking through holes in the wall, those spots can be sealed with another cement like plug made by the same company. The remaining 10% of original paint may come off in the future, but those can be touched up with the Drylock, which should give you the best results.


Okay, I appreciate the info!

Windy Painters 10-31-2011 01:31 PM

XIM Peel Bobd.
 
At first I would spray all problematic areas with XIM Peel Bond primer / sealer. It will seal peeling paint. It's like liquid rubber. Topcoat with Drylock or similar product.
Chicago painter
Lincoln Park Painter

chrisn 10-31-2011 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windy Painters (Post 760833)
At first I would spray all problematic areas with XIM Peel Bond primer / sealer. It will seal peeling paint. It's like liquid rubber. Topcoat with Drylock or similar product.
Chicago painter
Lincoln Park Painter


Read the can

You CANNOT apply Drylock over any other coating.

mazzonetv 10-31-2011 07:31 PM

Take a look at amesresearch.com. They make several "liquid rubber" coatings. I've used their blue max and their block and wall - amazing stuff AND can be applied over a painted surface. I would never finish a basement without it.

Windy Painters 10-31-2011 10:46 PM

You are right. My mistake. It requires regular topcoat.

jsheridan 11-01-2011 05:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkeith (Post 760376)
Then it sounds to me like my original solution might be best. Be sure to try to scrape off any remaining paint to save yourself some work in the future. If there is any efflorescence, ie. salt like residue that comes out and dries on the cement surface, be sure to wire brush that off and follow any other instructions on the can. If there is actual visible water leaking through holes in the wall, those spots can be sealed with another cement like plug made by the same company. The remaining 10% of original paint may come off in the future, but those can be touched up with the Drylock, which should give you the best results.

I was going to suggest applying drylock to the failing areas, but it looks like, with 90% failure, it will be a full coat. The trouble with this, as I found out, is that sealing one area simply forces the moisture to find an alternate way around the patch. It's not a good option from a contractor standpoint, but for a homeowner, who's always present, it can be stayed on top of. Good advice Kevin.


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