Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-22-2008, 09:49 PM   #1
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


I am doing a complete resoration of my house, and because there are so many layers of paint on the outside , and there is wide spread paint falure, I am removing all the old paint, exposing the bare wood. I am using 2 coats of oil-base primer, and 2 top-coats of Acrylic laytex. What is the finest grit sandpaper I should be sanding the wood with? I want a smooth finish, but I want to give the primer a good surface to gab on to.

Thank you for your advice!

bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2008, 11:09 PM   #2
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


Sanding after a full strip?
Well, it depends on what the siding/substrate actually is
And on how it's been stripped

slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 08:36 AM   #3
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


I am using the "paint shaver" to remove most of the paint. The corner-boards are pine, and the clap-boards are cypress or spruce(I think).
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 08:19 PM   #4
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


Hmmm....well the specific primer manufacturer may have a specific grit suggestion, but mostly they want to make sure the surface is not smooth or "glazed"
You'll have to make somewhat of a judgment call when the time comes, but generally no finer than 180
150 is probably a good starting point, as you can go up (180) or down (120)
It will probably be somewhere in there though
It depends on what the shaver leaves you, and the overall condition of the wood
slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 08:30 PM   #5
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


Thank you for your advice. To be honest with you, I have been using 120 grit as the finest, thinking that any finer might make it a little too smooth for the primer to get a good bite on the wood.

As far as the "Paint-Shaver" goes, you have to be real careful, or it'l really gouge the wood. I have found it to be better to get most of the paint off, leaving a little, and getting that off with a random-orbital sander with 40 grit paper. Then go to 80,, and finally 120. Does this sound OK? If not, I'll just use another step with 180.
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 09:51 PM   #6
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


Your instincts are probably correct for your project
I wouldn't step up unless you have issues

You must be doing a fair amount of material removal (comparatively) if you are using 40
An 80 then a 120 sounds about right if you need to start with a 40

Does the shaver leave any glazing (shiny spots)?
Or is the sanding mostly material removal and then smoothing a little?
slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 10:14 PM   #7
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


The shaver is actually rotating knifes, and you can adjust it to the amount of material you want to remove. Like everything else, there's a down side. It can remove a lot of wood very quickly, and mistakes do happen. I use Bondo to even up any "mistakes" I make. You can do a pretty good job if you're careful. However, there is an amount that the "shaver" can't reach, so there is the regular scrapeing and sanding that has to be done. There is also a sanding attachment, or assembly that sands it after the paint has been removed. All the paint and dust goes right to the vac. I would be having to remove a certain amount of wood anyway, because of the deteriation of the outer wood layer. If I try to paint right over the discolored wood, I believe it would peel in no time.

I guess it does OK, I had a local code enforcement officer saying he liked the way the new vynal siding looked on the house. He said it looked too good to be wood? What ever that means.

Thanks for the advice on the sanding. I have been doing it this way, but I figured if I was doing it wrong, I need to correct it now. Believe me, I'm no expert, and will never pretend to be one on this subject.
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 10:33 PM   #8
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


If you've roughed up any smooth (glazed) spots, and it's not real rough (like rough enough to show the roughness through the primer), then you're just about right

If you start priming and the surface is still lumpy after that (test a spot first), then step up to the 150/180
slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2008, 02:25 PM   #9
She'sapainter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: bay area California
Posts: 86
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


If you are removing all of your exterior paint you are in for aaaa... job, I hurt just thinking about it.

However if the paint is built up and failing I'm going to assume it's been 17 to 20 years since it's last repaint. Which in that case I personally would start with a 60 to 80 grit to cut through the touch area's, then I would move to a smoother grit and so on.
There is also a tool called a power stripper But use with caution for it is a wood house and the power stripper is a heat stripper , you can tell when to stop using this tool in the area your working.

Also in your area's where you are unable to get the wood smooth you can use a product called ( last o merit) It's a waterproofing compound that you can get in different grades of applications brushable it the best for mared area's as long as you apply in one direction with as less strokes as possible best used after prim coat. We painter have been using it for years.

Have you thought about one coat of prim and 3 coats of finish paint? the finish paint is what is going to give you your protection.
__________________
A drop cloth isen't to catch paint, It's to protect what is under so wipe the drips as you go and don't track.

Last edited by tverhoef; 02-24-2008 at 02:31 PM.
tverhoef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2008, 06:44 PM   #10
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


tverhoef, I haven't thought about 1 primer, and 3 topcoats, but I have been considering 2 primer and 3 topcoat. This is a huge house for one person to tackle. I've got all across the front downstairs (35') and now am started on the upstairs. I am doing a small section at a time, and was thinking about giving it one last topcoat when the entire front is complete.

Thank you for your feedback!

Last edited by bofusmosby; 02-25-2008 at 08:23 AM. Reason: spelling
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2008, 07:09 AM   #11
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,843
Rewards Points: 2,194
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


tverhoer, I haven't thought about 1 primer, and 3 topcoats, but I have been considering 2 primer and 3 topcoat.

What is the reasoning for 2 coats of primer??
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2008, 08:27 AM   #12
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


1 coat of primer does not cover well, so I give it a light sanding, before the second coat. I guess my inexperience tells me if 1 coat does good, then a second coat will be that much better. I know that I might be wrong on this, but so far, I have had no problems. Does it actually cause problems putting on a second coat of primer?
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2008, 10:55 AM   #13
She'sapainter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: bay area California
Posts: 86
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


Quote:
Originally Posted by bofusmosby View Post
1 coat of primer does not cover well, so I give it a light sanding, before the second coat. I guess my inexperience tells me if 1 coat does good, then a second coat will be that much better. I know that I might be wrong on this, but so far, I have had no problems. Does it actually cause problems putting on a second coat of primer?
One coat of primer should be sufficient, If your not ripping the primer. Primer is an under coat it is used as a sealer and a gripper for the paint it doesn't have a strong skin. where as the finish paint is made to with stand the elements it sort of encapsulates your house. this is your house and not mine,Good Luck

Just be careful that you don't put so much primer that it doesn't dry under the paint.
__________________
A drop cloth isen't to catch paint, It's to protect what is under so wipe the drips as you go and don't track.
tverhoef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2008, 06:44 PM   #14
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Rewards Points: 250
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


When I put down a coat of primer, It usually is at least a week before I put the top-coat on(or the second coat of primer).

So in other words, there is no reason to put on 2 coats of primer? I guess that blows my thinking out of the water.

Thank you for the advice!
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2008, 08:00 PM   #15
She'sapainter
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: bay area California
Posts: 86
Rewards Points: 75
Default

What Grit to Sand With?


That is correct... if at one week you dont see any lifting then the primer has done its job..which would allow you to spend extra monies on more finish paint which is going to do all the real work.

Just keep in mind I live in CA and we normally don't have the wheather like most in th midwest and east coast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bofusmosby View Post
When I put down a coat of primer, It usually is at least a week before I put the top-coat on(or the second coat of primer).

So in other words, there is no reason to put on 2 coats of primer? I guess that blows my thinking out of the water.

Thank you for the advice!

__________________
A drop cloth isen't to catch paint, It's to protect what is under so wipe the drips as you go and don't track.
tverhoef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paint with a grit texture???? Sellncars Painting 3 09-24-2006 07:37 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.