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Old 02-08-2012, 08:31 AM   #1
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Water Based Polyurethane


Anyone use the stuff? I have a bar top to finish that will see a lot of abuse and Iím concerned about how tough the water based is long term.

This is one application where no or low odor would be a good thing but not to the point where Iím willing to jeopardize the quality of the finish. Iím looking to do a 6-8 coat build up.

Iíd also like to here what you all think about the wipe on stuff and how many coats of it does it take to equal one coat of the brush on.

Thanks.

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Old 02-08-2012, 08:44 AM   #2
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Water Based Polyurethane


I used it all the time. It is all you can get now in growing number of US states.

You might be better off with an epoxy bar finish given wear and use you anticipate

Make sure resins are within expiration dates or stuff may not cure.

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Old 02-08-2012, 02:31 PM   #3
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Water Based Polyurethane


Used a lot of it in years gone by. It's actually not a bad product. You get a clear rather than a yellowed finish. It does require more sanding as the water raises the grain quite a bit. I still prefer polyurethane for it's rich patina, but, water-based is a decent alternative. Only downside is the durability factor and hardness is not quite as good as an oil-based poly. You don't want to use it on floors, etc, where it will likely scratch/wear in no time. I've used it on trim, windows, doors with no problems.
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Old 02-08-2012, 03:18 PM   #4
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Water Based Polyurethane


I used it on an old reclaimed table...as soon as I had water spilled, u could see it darkening and soaking through...not sure if it was the product or. It enough coats.
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Old 02-08-2012, 10:03 PM   #5
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Water Based Polyurethane


Hey Ron,
Go to www.generalfinishes.com , they have a line of products that will make a believer out of you. I've used their exterior line this past summer and it really made me look good. I hope you're good, cuz it's drying as fast as you can put it on. No time to go back and touch up. You would need to add an extender.
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Old 02-08-2012, 10:15 PM   #6
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Water Based Polyurethane


May want to concider decoupage instead. It will give you what looks like 6 coats in one application.
Ever been in a bar and they had any number of things seal under a rock hard finish. Could be match book covers, bar coasters ect.
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Old 02-09-2012, 09:01 AM   #7
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Water Based Polyurethane


Thanks for the replies.

Sdester: I thought about the epoxy, I’ve used it before but this top is a 25’- 6” Cant of Douglas fir. The finish on the edge is as important as the top. Not sure how I’d pull that off with a pour.


Gymschu: you sold me on the oil. I’m glad you mentioned clear verses yellowed, this wood is fairly light and will have no stain, so anything to darken it up a bit is a good thing.

Good point on the extra sanding, between the bar, back bar and exposed shelving which will all be d fir there’ll be plenty of sanding, I surley don’t need any extra.


Spraygunn: thanks for the link but I’ll save the “how good I am” experiment for another project.


Joecaption: I know of a sports bar that did that with all of the tables using sports cards and the like. I thought it was pretty cool and it fit in with that place nicely but this place is all about loggers and fisherman so showcasing the wood is what it's all about. I actually used 10” +/- logs for corner post on the siding.


One more question. I was considering a coat of shellac before the poly build up to prevent anything that may want to leach out down the road. That step was suggested to me by an old timer in town. Any thoughts on that one?
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Last edited by kwikfishron; 02-09-2012 at 09:40 PM.
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Old 02-09-2012, 10:27 AM   #8
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Water Based Polyurethane


Quote:
Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
Thanks for the replies.

Sdester: I thought about the epoxy, I’ve used it before but this top is a 25’- 6” Cant of Douglas fir. The finish on the edge is as important as the top. Not sure how I’d pull that off with a pour.


Gymschu: you sold me on the oil. I’m glad you mentioned clear verses yellowed, this wood is fairly light and will have no stain so anything to darken it up a bit is a good thing. Good point on the extra sanding, between the bar, back bar and exposed shelving which will all be d fir there’ll be plenty of sanding, I surley don’t need any extra.


Spraygunn: thanks for the link but I’ll save the “how good I am” experiment for another project.
Also, why didn't you want to use oil based poly?

Joecaption: I know of a sports bar that did that with all of the tables using sports cards and the like. I thought it was pretty cool and it fit in with that place nicely but this place is all about loggers and fisherman so showcasing the wood is what this place is all about. I actually used 10” +/- logs for corner post on the siding.


One more question. I was considering a coat of shellac before the poly build up to prevent anything that may want to leach out down the road. That step was suggested to me by an old timer in town. Any thoughts on that one?
I've not heard of using shellac and poly, but I'm no expert either. Seems like shellac would be used in several coats to provide a solid "shell", not sure what poly would add.

Last edited by cibula11; 02-09-2012 at 10:30 AM.
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Old 02-09-2012, 10:45 AM   #9
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Water Based Polyurethane


Shellac would be a poor system for a bar top. Joecaption is referring to casting resin, a 2-part epoxy system. Single-component Polyurethanes can be okay, but still are not adequate enough for bar-top use. The oil polyurethane would be the better of the two but, polyurethanes have a slightly yellow cast to them and an oil will yellow with age.

I would recommend a two-part, clear waterborne aliphatic polyurethane for a bar top. We have a long history of success with this self-priming system, Are you near a Miller Paint store? Check my profile information and call me toll-free; I can tell you what to ask for.
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Old 02-11-2012, 07:37 AM   #10
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Water Based Polyurethane


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Paint View Post
I would recommend a two-part, clear waterborne aliphatic polyurethane for a bar top. We have a long history of success with this self-priming system, Are you near a Miller Paint store? Check my profile information and call me toll-free; I can tell you what to ask for.
Thanks for the reply, how about tell us all what “clear waterborne aliphatic polyurethane” has over the hardest poly Varathane has to offer?

I do have a Miller Paint Store within reach and still have a few days to experiment before committing to a finish. What’s the name of this Miller product?
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:27 PM   #11
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Water Based Polyurethane


Miller is an Authorized Kelly-Moore Dealer. You want to inquire about Kelly-Moore 405 Waterborne Polyurethane. This is a catalyzed product and will offer a much more chemical-resistant and harder finish, If they don't know about it, have them call me and I will e-mail them a data sheet.

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