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guido13 03-08-2013 05:55 AM

warranty
 
what is considered grounds for the paint warranty. how do you claim it I have the receipts and used American tradition primer first on fresh drywall. what is the most common problem that they run into and have to warranty the paint. bleeding through after some years. "Blotchy" or "chalky" or what.

Gymschu 03-08-2013 06:48 AM

For the most part, just like anything, you have to meet so many conditions that the warranty really isn't worth the paper it's printed on.

joecaption 03-08-2013 08:06 AM

And at most you end up with a free gal of the paint that failed.

ric knows paint 03-08-2013 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by guido13 (Post 1132275)
what is considered grounds for the paint warranty. how do you claim it I have the receipts and used American tradition primer first on fresh drywall. what is the most common problem that they run into and have to warranty the paint. bleeding through after some years. "Blotchy" or "chalky" or what.

Hiya Guido,

Good question. Most manufacturers place a "limited" warranty and/or a "Satisfaction Guaranteed" warranty on their consumer products. In most cases that means if you're not satisfied with the product you're entitled to replacement material or your money back. That usually entails returning any unused product, with receipt, to the place of purchase - or dealing directly with the manufacturer via phone calls, emails, threatening letters, etc.

Realistically though, if you're looking to file claim against the performance of a product weeks, months or years after application, with expectations of anything but replacement product (or refund), you're probably in for a very frustrating and un-rewarding experience.

The reasons for that is many, but not the least of which is the fact that there are so many external factors that can affect the performance of a product - the manufacturer can simply point to any number of these variables to defend their product and be free of any liability or punitive consequences...and the bad things is, they'd be right. Paints fail to perform for a reason and a manufacturer has no control over most of the issues that cause poor performance or failure. Without question, the absolute number one reason for failure is incomplete or improper surface preparation - in other words, "applicator error"...

Probably the second most cause of paint performance issues are improper application (applied too heavy, applied too thin, improper tools used for app, etc.), followed by unauthorized altering of material (over-thinning, adding foreign products to mix such as flow regulators, bonding agents, etc.), followed by atmospheric conditions at time of app such as high heat, cold temps, high humidity, etc. etc. etc...Rarely (and this point is important), Rarely is a problem the fault of the paint...Rarely. For all the reasons of paint failure I've listed above, none are within the control of the manufacturer.

If a product claim becomes noisy enough, the manufacturer will usually send someone to inspect the job - and almost without exception, the representative will be able to find a definitive cause to the problem that is beyond the scope of what the product's realistic performance capabilities should encompass (trust me on this...this is kinda what I do). In these instances the manufacturer will sometimes offer up, as a goodwill gesture only, replacement product - or suitable comp'd. products to repair the problem at hand.

Manufacturers assemble paint components to a pretty exact formulation - then most products are subjected to pretty grueling quality control testing at several different intervals - once quality control gives their blessing the product is then packaged and made available for delivery. But before the product is packaged and made available for delivery, the mfr. keeps a portion of the batch (called a "retain") to compare against a standard in the event product complaints arise. Thus, when a product receives a complaint, the specific batch date is pulled from the can(s) that were used then compared against the batch retain. If the batch retain has been determined to be free from manufacturing defect, then the problem must be caused by an external factor beyond the control of the manufacturer.

What I would recommend is call the manufacturer and have them take a look at your problem - let them determine the causes and solutions to your problem and ask for their assistance in the resolve. In most cases, they will be willing to help as they'd much rather have a satisfied customer than one who squaks and *****es to their friends about a bad experience with their product. Just as an FYI, in most cases threatening any kind of legal action will shut down all communication you may have had with this mfr, and negate any offers they may have come up with to help in the resolve.


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