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Old 03-24-2011, 04:25 PM   #1
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Using Polyurethane


I finished staining 3 new interior oak doors. I'm ready to add the polyurethane. My question is, do I have to sand my newly stained door before I add the first coat of polyurethane?

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Old 03-24-2011, 04:42 PM   #2
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Using Polyurethane


Depends on how smooth you want the final product.

Doesn't hurt as long as you are using the finest grain paper you can find and stay with the grain.

Do your sanding somewhere other than where you will be doing your poly and be sure and tack cloth after each sanding.

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Old 03-24-2011, 06:09 PM   #3
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Using Polyurethane


Thank you - your response is very helpful...

One more question - is it okay to use spar urethane on an interior door? A friend recommended using this instead of polyurethane. Although, everything i've read leads me to believe this is exterior only. Any preference?
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Old 03-24-2011, 07:15 PM   #4
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Using Polyurethane


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Originally Posted by Drzycimski View Post
Thank you - your response is very helpful...

One more question - is it okay to use spar urethane on an interior door? A friend recommended using this instead of polyurethane. Although, everything i've read leads me to believe this is exterior only. Any preference?

If the interior doors frequently recieves sunlight, then yes.

Apply 1st polyurethane coat.
Use 320 lightly sand and so on

Last edited by StevenH; 03-25-2011 at 03:23 PM.
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Old 03-24-2011, 09:11 PM   #5
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Using Polyurethane


Sanding before poly coat is not always necessary. If you sanded well before staining and used a tack cloth to remove all dust then your finish will be pretty smooth. You can lightly sand or use 000 steel wool if you feel its necessary. Spar is an exterior polyurethane. it contains UV protection, which your interior polys don't have. You can apply your poly directly over your stain. 2-3 coats of poly.
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:25 AM   #6
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Using Polyurethane


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Sanding before poly coat is not always necessary. If you sanded well before staining and used a tack cloth to remove all dust then your finish will be pretty smooth. You can lightly sand or use 000 steel wool if you feel its necessary. Spar is an exterior polyurethane. it contains UV protection, which your interior polys don't have. You can apply your poly directly over your stain. 2-3 coats of poly.
Correct, and typically with Oak, the grain doesnt raise much after staining, as with most hardwoods. Make the judgement call yourself, feel it. Is it rough or smooth?
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Old 03-27-2011, 01:49 PM   #7
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Using Polyurethane


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I finished staining 3 new interior oak doors. I'm ready to add the polyurethane. My question is, do I have to sand my newly stained door before I add the first coat of polyurethane?
just finished polyurethane on a bar top wished i would have used grain sealer. It's oak but coated it 6 or 7 time 320 grit sand paper between coat came out great take your time
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Old 03-27-2011, 03:13 PM   #8
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Using Polyurethane


I have done many projects that I have finished with Poly. I sand or use steel wool between ech coat. If you want a real glossy finish I would recommend steel wool and tach cloth between coats. If you don't have a tach cloth put some mineral spirits on a white (used a red rag once...lol) rag and wipe with that. It works great.
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Old 03-27-2011, 04:21 PM   #9
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Using Polyurethane


You'd have to have some serious splinters or pebbles on a newly stained door to feel them after three coats of poly. I, personally, would never touch freshly stained wood with a piece of sandpaper or steel wool. The risk of cutting to raw wood or marring the uniformity of the stain is too great for the minimal return it would accomplish. Put the first coat on, give a good sand, tack it down, recoat, light sand, tack, recoat, done. Important: Either strain your poly before each use or pour enough off to do three doors, when done set that aside, pour off more from the gallon for the second coat, ie, always be sure your clear is clean.
Edit: If you didn't do the proper sanding before staining, after staining and before the first clear, is not the time to do it.

Last edited by jsheridan; 03-27-2011 at 04:24 PM.
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Old 03-27-2011, 05:00 PM   #10
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Using Polyurethane


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You'd have to have some serious splinters or pebbles on a newly stained door to feel them after three coats of poly. I, personally, would never touch freshly stained wood with a piece of sandpaper or steel wool. The risk of cutting to raw wood or marring the uniformity of the stain is too great for the minimal return it would accomplish. Put the first coat on, give a good sand, tack it down, recoat, light sand, tack, recoat, done. Important: Either strain your poly before each use or pour enough off to do three doors, when done set that aside, pour off more from the gallon for the second coat, ie, always be sure your clear is clean.
Edit: If you didn't do the proper sanding before staining, after staining and before the first clear, is not the time to do it.
Well said

I've seen people sand off the stain color or to bare wood, which is not pleasant do.

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