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-   -   Uhh .. how long for latex trim paint to dry? Hear me out here. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/uhh-how-long-latex-trim-paint-dry-hear-me-out-here-161019/)

CoconutPete 10-24-2012 10:49 AM

Uhh .. how long for latex trim paint to dry? Hear me out here.
 
Even though we did our kitchen back in March I just finished putting trim on the window by the sink.

I used the same latex trim paint I have been using all over the house since we bought it. Sanded the trim, 1 coat of primer, 2 coats of paint.

Now I'm noticing when little water droplets get on the trim and sit there, the paint "bubbles" up for lack of a better word - where the water sits. I covered the area for around 3 days before I allowed the occasional water droplet splatter to get on it. Is there an extended period I need to wait? Or does this just happen - did I make a mistake and should I have bought an additive to make the paint stand up to the occasional water droplet?

user1007 10-24-2012 12:12 PM

Latex and acrylic products take up to 30 days to fully cure---especially for higher sheens. Even after that it is not uncommon for the surface to turn "milky" where water hits it. This is especially noticeable if you set glassware down on an acrylic surface. The milkiness should go away when the moisture dries out.

That said, if the paint is actually bubbling something is causing its adhesion to the primer to fail under the water droplets. Or the water is seeping all the way through the primer coat? It could be moisture or some reaction between the primer and the moisture outgassing. Perhaps the incidence of this happening will alleviate as the surface fully cures.

What primer and paint did you use?

CoconutPete 10-24-2012 12:13 PM

They were both just the house brand at Sherwin Williams.

user1007 10-24-2012 12:54 PM

I would see where you stand after 30 days unless the bubbles are remaining and not surfacing themselves out?

CoconutPete 10-24-2012 01:35 PM

Sdester you described it pretty well - the paint gets "milky" - that's a better description than bubbles.

I will give it another couple of weeks to take me to around 30 days and see how it behaves.

What you are saying though is that it's not necessarily something to worry about if I get a milky looking spot, it'll dry itself out again?


Thanks

user1007 10-24-2012 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CoconutPete (Post 1037122)
Sdester you described it pretty well - the paint gets "milky" - that's a better description than bubbles.

I will give it another couple of weeks to take me to around 30 days and see how it behaves.

What you are saying though is that it's not necessarily something to worry about if I get a milky looking spot, it'll dry itself out again?


Thanks

So long as it is not an adhesion problem I would not worry. That milky reaction is just the nature of the beast and may continue to happen after 30 days. As mentioned, it should go away when the moisture lifts without hurting anything but the appearance---temporarily. Obviously you do not want to make a point of drenching any painted surfaces and it is best to blot the moisture off if you can soon as it happens. Hard in a kitchen I know.

Obviously, darker colors are going to show this happening more than lighter ones. It shows up in clear polycrylic finishes over dark woods too.


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