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Old 01-13-2012, 10:03 PM   #1
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


Hey guys, this is my first visit to the Paint section on this site and I had a few questions.

I recently finished my basement, well........almost.

Turned out pretty good, but the drywall has been a running issue. In the future, I think I will leave this area to the pros. After doubling my work and re doing areas, it turned out pretty good. Everything is clean at least, no messy corners or joints. However.........there are multiple areas on the walls that have a "bulge" to them. Either from the drywall joints, or a stud that wasn't quite straight.

Anywho..........

They are very hard to notice with the walls primed with drywall primer, but I put some test colors on the walls to help decide which color to go with and I noticed that the bulges are somewhat visible. Yes, you can feel them also. I know nothing is perfect when you do it yourself for the first time........but are there certain shades of paint and colors that I should avoid of go with in order to help hide these imperfections? I am guessing something eggshell, but have no idea in regards to color.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

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Old 01-13-2012, 10:09 PM   #2
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


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Originally Posted by Mills314 View Post
Hey guys, this is my first visit to the Paint section on this site and I had a few questions.

I recently finished my basement, well........almost.

Turned out pretty good, but the drywall has been a running issue. In the future, I think I will leave this area to the pros. After doubling my work and re doing areas, it turned out pretty good. Everything is clean at least, no messy corners or joints. However.........there are multiple areas on the walls that have a "bulge" to them. Either from the drywall joints, or a stud that wasn't quite straight.

Anywho..........

They are very hard to notice with the walls primed with drywall primer, but I put some test colors on the walls to help decide which color to go with and I noticed that the bulges are somewhat visible. Yes, you can feel them also. I know nothing is perfect when you do it yourself for the first time........but are there certain shades of paint and colors that I should avoid of go with in order to help hide these imperfections? I am guessing something eggshell, but have no idea in regards to color.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!
not to sure about a color to hide imperfections....but a flat paint will hide alot...

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Old 01-13-2012, 10:11 PM   #3
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


How big are the bulges?

You can get that silica grit stuff that you add to the paint. IT obviously add texture to the paint, but it hides minor imperfections.
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:13 PM   #4
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


I'd go with Satin. flat hides flaws, but very hard to clean and hands prints stick out.
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:15 PM   #5
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


as soon as you put anykind of shine to the surface it will show your imperfections......
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:38 PM   #6
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


Put 25 watt bulbs in the fixtures to hide it.
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Old 01-13-2012, 10:38 PM   #7
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


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as soon as you put anykind of shine to the surface it will show your imperfections......
Found that out the hard way. Built a bathroom in the basement and there is one stud bulge that won't go away.

Obviously, I used kitchen and bath paint. to make it easy to clean.

I like the idea of adding some texture to the walls in order to keep it hidden.

The bulges arent huge, I actually feathered them out a little bit.

I think it was a framing issue, because like I said, the drywall joints look good.

Any idea where I can see some wall texture examples? It needs to fit the theme of a bar, since thats what this side of the basement is going to be.

It would really have to be a light texture since I am not the biggest fan of textured walls.

I also have the same thing going on in the stairwell going into the basement. However this was totally a builder issue and there is no way that it can be corrected. I am just going to have to feather that joint out more.

Or would I be able to just get ridiculous and apply coat after coat of primer with a 1/2" nap roller in hopes that it hides it?
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Old 01-13-2012, 11:19 PM   #8
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


To hide imperfections- the flatter the better.
Of course you will be sacrificing any wash or scuff resistance with a flat.
All about priorities.
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Old 01-14-2012, 06:05 AM   #9
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


You can use a flat enamel, not quite the same but similar to matte. It has a slight angular sheen, but not much. It does though have some better protective value and can be cleaned. Joecaption, satin? Why not put some safety orange arrows pointing to the defect?
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:26 AM   #10
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


Hey Mills,

If you've already primed this may be moot, but years ago Porter Paints (before PPG...before Cortaulds) made a product called 426 Drywall Primer that contained a very fine aggregate. Once applied, you'd then apply 2 coats of a quality wall paint to bury the profile created by the aggregated primer - resulting in a very smooth finish that'd deflect light from highlighting bulges and imperfections. Unfortunately, I don't think they still make such a product and am not sure you can get the same results by mixing your own primer (especially with a silica aggregate - too coarse) - it may be worth checking w/PPG to see if this primer is still available. I would NOT add an aggregate to my finish products. To further minimize bulges, obviously stay away from sheened products (satin, semi, etc. - even eggshells), and avoid custom mixed deep or accent colors. There are several high quality, washable, flat (actually matte) finishes that'd work well in your situation - consider ceramic type products for max washability and burnish resistance in "flat" finishes...Good luck.

Last edited by ric knows paint; 01-14-2012 at 07:29 AM.
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:31 AM   #11
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


I agree satin has enough gloss to make imperfections stand out. Flat or matte would be the better option here. My flat Benjamin Moore Regal cleans up really well when I dab it with a water-dampened rag.
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Old 01-14-2012, 09:12 AM   #12
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


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Hey Mills,

If you've already primed this may be moot, but years ago Porter Paints (before PPG...before Cortaulds) made a product called 426 Drywall Primer that contained a very fine aggregate. Once applied, you'd then apply 2 coats of a quality wall paint to bury the profile created by the aggregated primer - resulting in a very smooth finish that'd deflect light from highlighting bulges and imperfections. Unfortunately, I don't think they still make such a product and am not sure you can get the same results by mixing your own primer (especially with a silica aggregate - too coarse) - it may be worth checking w/PPG to see if this primer is still available. I would NOT add an aggregate to my finish products. To further minimize bulges, obviously stay away from sheened products (satin, semi, etc. - even eggshells), and avoid custom mixed deep or accent colors. There are several high quality, washable, flat (actually matte) finishes that'd work well in your situation - consider ceramic type products for max washability and burnish resistance in "flat" finishes...Good luck.
Ric, thanks for the heads up. I will check with PPG in regards to that versus going with Valspar or an off the shelf brand like that. Maybe they still make something that will work for my situation.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:26 PM   #13
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


Havent had any luck with the 426 primer, but have hear a little buzz about Tuff Hide.

Any thoughts on this one gents?
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:40 PM   #14
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


Quote:
Originally Posted by ric knows paint View Post
Hey Mills,

If you've already primed this may be moot, but years ago Porter Paints (before PPG...before Cortaulds) made a product called 426 Drywall Primer that contained a very fine aggregate. Once applied, you'd then apply 2 coats of a quality wall paint to bury the profile created by the aggregated primer - resulting in a very smooth finish that'd deflect light from highlighting bulges and imperfections. Unfortunately, I don't think they still make such a product and am not sure you can get the same results by mixing your own primer (especially with a silica aggregate - too coarse) - it may be worth checking w/PPG to see if this primer is still available. I would NOT add an aggregate to my finish products. To further minimize bulges, obviously stay away from sheened products (satin, semi, etc. - even eggshells), and avoid custom mixed deep or accent colors. There are several high quality, washable, flat (actually matte) finishes that'd work well in your situation - consider ceramic type products for max washability and burnish resistance in "flat" finishes...Good luck.
Ric- is USG's First Coat similar? Kind of like rolling on a coat of mud rather than primer?
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Old 01-15-2012, 11:07 PM   #15
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Types of paint for minimizing drywall imperfections....


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Ric- is USG's First Coat similar? Kind of like rolling on a coat of mud rather than primer?
Ric seems to be the pro at this, however I was watching some you tube videos with that last night.

It looks like the standard level 4 finish is from rolling on a skim coat and spraying on some tuff hide, or ppg 426 primer. I would like to stay away from spraying as part of the basement is already finished, but if I have to, then I have to. I need to go back to ppg and see if you can roll on something like that with a 1/2" roller or something.

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