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-   -   Type of brush for priming trim (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/type-brush-priming-trim-181438/)

davej77 06-07-2013 09:46 AM

Type of brush for priming trim
 
Do you use your best brushes for priming trim that will be coated with glossy enamel, or do you feel primer will somehow ruin your best bushes and therefore use something cheaper for primer?

joecaption 06-07-2013 10:14 AM

Not sure how you figure primmer is going to hurt a brush.
I just use a 2-1/2 Purdy brand sash brush for all of it.
If you have a bad primmer job with brush marks, no form of finish paint is going to fix that.

davej77 06-07-2013 10:18 AM

I have wondered whether primer, because it sticks so well, would be harder to thoroughly clean from a brush and would tend to clog up the upper bristles where it's difficult to clean, thus shortening the life of the brush.

However, I've been using my best brushes to get the smoothest coat of primer and have not had trouble cleaning them. Just wondered what others think about this.

joecaption 06-07-2013 10:55 AM

If your getting paint all the way up to the farrell your dipping the brush in to deep in the paint.

user1007 06-07-2013 03:09 PM

I tend to evolve nice brushes. I use new ones for trim paint and cutting in and as they become a little clogged and lose some flexibility I use them for primer, which is a little stickier and harder to get out of a brush.

None of mine ever get so bad some as those horrible cheap things with the coarse bristles, plastic handles, etc. I see DIYers buying. I guess they think they are so great because they are so cheap they do not have to clean them.

In general, you want to use a quality brush for primer, paint, or varnish. Expect to pay $15ish retail for a good Purdy or Wooster brush. More perhaps for natural bristle brushes for oil finishes and varnishes.

If as a homeowner, if you invest in a couple good ones for each type paint, and take care of them, they should last you near the ownership of your home if not longer. And don't fall for the packages of brushes even from the brands mentioned. I used a 2.5-3" angled sash brush most of the time.

ltd 06-07-2013 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1197035)
I tend to evolve nice brushes. I use new ones for trim paint and cutting in and as they become a little clogged and lose some flexibility I use them for primer, which is a little stickier and harder to get out of a brush.

None of mine ever get so bad some as those horrible cheap things with the coarse bristles, plastic handles, etc. I see DIYers buying. I guess they think they are so great because they are so cheap they do not have to clean them.

In general, you want to use a quality brush for primer, paint, or varnish. Expect to pay $15ish retail for a good Purdy or Wooster brush. More perhaps for natural bristle brushes for oil finishes and varnishes.

If as a homeowner, if you invest in a couple good ones for each type paint, and take care of them, they should last you near the ownership of your home if not longer. And don't fall for the packages of brushes even from the brands mentioned. I used a 2.5-3" angled sash brush most of the time.

yep that's right :thumbsup:

kimberland30 06-10-2013 02:43 PM

I just cleaned all my wooster and purdy brushes over the weekend. They looked something awful - dried paint and primer on most of them. I just put them in a metal container with brush cleaner - covered it with foil and let it sit overnight. Used a wire brush the next day to get all the remaining paint out and voila...good as new.

Matthewt1970 06-11-2013 12:38 PM

Mine start out for trim and final coats. Then they get downgraded to ceiling paint and primer. Then they are a dust brush.

chrisn 06-11-2013 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kimberland30 (Post 1198698)
I just cleaned all my wooster and purdy brushes over the weekend. They looked something awful - dried paint and primer on most of them. I just put them in a metal container with brush cleaner - covered it with foil and let it sit overnight. Used a wire brush the next day to get all the remaining paint out and voila...good as new.


probably not, most of that stuff ruins the bristles on the brush, it might look good but it's actual life is most likely shot

kimberland30 06-12-2013 09:33 AM

Could be, but it was better than throwing them all out and starting with new ones. I used one last night and it seemed to be fine. :)

RWolff 06-12-2013 12:33 PM

Ive always liked those "chip" brushes, made with natural bristles for all painting, the bristles are fine and work smoothly, they have a wood handle and generally are inexpensive.
They are the best brushes I've used on smaller projects- they don't come larger than about 4"

KD PAINTING 06-14-2013 09:21 PM

Type of brush for priming trim
 
Primer will not damage your brush in any way, I suggest using a quality brush even when priming.

Good Luck!


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