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ennyl 04-17-2012 11:26 AM

toxic paint low VOC
 
Buying a new house and have decided any replacements or paint will be low VOC. All the toxins in products has me somewhat concerned.

Does anyone else share the same concerns?

user1007 04-17-2012 11:45 AM

I would get real paint store paint. One with a scanner can match the colors you picked with no problem. You will be much happier with the paint than that from a box store. All major companies have low and no VOC products. Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams and other real paint stores will be running nice sales soon. Watch your paper or look online for coupons.

ennyl 04-17-2012 12:30 PM

I've never used a scanner to match paint, but love the idea and will drag my comforter in to match it. We have a Sherwin Williams store here. thanks

user1007 04-17-2012 12:51 PM

If you have an accurate scanner at home, I can coach you through how to match colors in the comforter to major paint color numbers and names without leaving the house! Just a few easy steps.

1. Lay a section of the comforter on the scanner bed and capture a good crisp image.

2. Use a free pixel grabber to get the RGB code of the color you want to match from the scanned image. It will display as you roll the cursor over different parts of the image. I like the one in PicPick which is a great free program for other things too.

3. If you want to explore shades and tints of the color load and play with Color Impact. Free to try and $40 or something to buy. Just enter the RGB code. I use CI all the time in my color consulting work.

4. If you want the color exactly as scanned, or once you pick a shade or tint, enter the RGB code at the free site, www.easyrgb.com. You will be asked to pick a major paint company color collection. The software will display the four closest collection colors along with names and chip numbers.

5. Double check the color at the paint store. Off you go!

6. The virtual painting programs available free from Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore and others can be fun too. You can pick a masked photo of a room similar to yours or upload your photo and mask off areas to be painted. Then pick colors and try out combinations before ever ordering paint.

You should calibrate your monitor to the standard for viewing color which is 6500K. There will be an option for this in settings. EasyRGB has an option to calibrate your monitor on a per use basis as well.

Just read another post on this site where the OP indicated SW was about to run its 40 percent off spring sale. You will be happier with real paint. Benjamin Moore will be matching the pricing I am sure.

Will22 04-17-2012 03:55 PM

Low and no-VOC paints are generally free of solvents and other additives, and perform well. They are not considered to be non-toxic, although Mythic claims to have this property.

As stated, most paint manufacturers (especially the major ones) have low and no-VOC products; they definitely have to comply with EPA regulations across the country, in order to sell their paints. Volatile organic compounds contribute to pollution, and can be beneficial for indoor air quality (especially with residents who may be chemical sensitive).

ennyl 04-17-2012 04:14 PM

no scanner at home, now. But, I'll copy and paste your info for future use. I really appreciate this. THANKS :D

user1007 04-17-2012 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ennyl (Post 901068)
no scanner at home, now. But, I'll copy and paste your info for future use. I really appreciate this. THANKS :D

Could work from a color correct digital photograph if you can pick up the colors in your comforter with a camera.

chrisn 04-17-2012 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ennyl (Post 900894)
Buying a new house and have decided any replacements or paint will be low VOC. All the toxins in products has me somewhat concerned.

Like what?


Does anyone else share the same concerns?


no:no:

jsheridan 04-17-2012 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 901125)
no:no:

I'll second that, heartily and emphatically. If the toxins in paint were that bad, after twenty - twenty five years of daily use and exposure, I would be dead or completely incapacitated. I breathe it, ingest it, and absorb it through my skin. Oh sure, I drool a little, but it's no big deal (:laughing:Shirley, I jest). The incidental exposure you're going to receive is nothing compared to what you're getting dosed by in society as a whole. Use anti-perspirant? What about all that aluminum you're plugging your sweat glands with? New York City is a hotbed for low/no voc/toxins in paint. They trudge the sidewalks of the Big Apple sucking in pounds of toxins, CO and CO2 from car exhaust, dry cleaning vents, restaurants, subway vents and stations, and on and on, and then they demand no toxin paint. If you can smell it, you're ingesting it. I hate to be the fly at the picnic, well, among the flies, me and Chrisn, but society is being whipped into an hysteria by certain powers that be. But, it's a free society, for the time being.

Brushjockey 04-17-2012 09:54 PM

I also concur with the guys -the whole thing is much smoke and mirrors-
For one thing - low VOC means nothing really about indoor air quality. It is about ozone depleting chemicals- - volatile organic compounds.
Sometimes this may mean it is low odor- sometimes not. For instance, ammonia is not considered a voc, and it is in many paints.
But that said, paint companies do also get that most people THINK it means it doesn't smell, and that is in some circumstances a goal they try to achive. But also at some sacrifice to the qualities of what the paint does.
And chemists are working very hard in the paint industry.
Know that there is a correlation to paint performance and price. Particularly in the low voc's. A cheap one will just leave stuff out to make the claim, a pricy one will find the resins that will still do the job and mantain the low VOC's.
I personally like the Regal Select line of Ben Moore, or the Aura if I want a real high test paint. They are low- not no, voc's, but strike a nice balance.

user1007 04-18-2012 10:34 AM

There are things in the home outgassing or otherwise emitting toxins more than dried paint

chrisn 04-18-2012 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 901185)
I'll second that, heartily and emphatically. If the toxins in paint were that bad, after twenty - twenty five years of daily use and exposure, I would be dead or completely incapacitated. I breathe it, ingest it, and absorb it through my skin. Oh sure, I drool a little, but it's no big deal (:laughing:Shirley, I jest). The incidental exposure you're going to receive is nothing compared to what you're getting dosed by in society as a whole. Use anti-perspirant? What about all that aluminum you're plugging your sweat glands with? New York City is a hotbed for low/no voc/toxins in paint. They trudge the sidewalks of the Big Apple sucking in pounds of toxins, CO and CO2 from car exhaust, dry cleaning vents, restaurants, subway vents and stations, and on and on, and then they demand no toxin paint. If you can smell it, you're ingesting it. I hate to be the fly at the picnic, well, among the flies, me and Chrisn, but society is being whipped into an hysteria by certain powers that be. But, it's a free society, for the time being.

I talk to myself a lot:yes:

I was sitting here this morning @ about 3AM trying to put into words what you have have so eloquently said:whistling2:

Mr. Paint 04-18-2012 06:54 PM

I wonder if people who get so hysterical about VOCs have ever had a bowel movement? Talk about toxic...:nuke:

jsheridan 04-18-2012 08:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Paint (Post 901950)
I wonder if people who get so hysterical about VOCs have ever had a bowel movement? Talk about toxic...:nuke:

I'll say it again, I learned it in college biology, if you can smell it, you're ingesting it. You can't smell carbon monoxide, nor would you smell natural gas if they didn't purposely odorize it to smell. So not being able to smell something doesn't mean it won't hurt or kill you. On your point Mr Paint, cow flatulence is a measurable and significant contributor to "global warming", so they say. I say we need to eat more red meat to end the scourge of cows warming the globe. Vegans and vegetarians are destroying the environment by not eating globe warming cows, and veggies make you very gassy. There are more people than cows. It's a vicious cycle.

7echo 04-18-2012 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Paint (Post 901950)
I wonder if people who get so hysterical about VOCs have ever had a bowel movement? Talk about toxic...:nuke:

There are always people going on and on about VOCs and sick buildings and things they smell that 'are killing them'. I quoted your comment cause it is similar to a comment I make on a regular basis. No one calls OSHA or the EPA after a bowel movement, but let someone crack a can of paint open and we are all dead.


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