Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-19-2012, 02:55 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Tinting old wood trim


I have nice wood trim in a 1923 cape cod house that I would like to touch up. It's painted with old varnish that gives it a yellow hue. I would like to avoid stripping all the trim in the house due to effort and time this would require.

Most of the trim has grooves, various curves and etc which will make stripping a nightmare.

Instead I'd rather paint the trim with a nice tinted polyurethane with a brown-red color to minimize the yellow hue, maybe American Chestnut, Walnut or something similar.

Have you had experience using tinted polyurthene? Any problems using it?

amclin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2012, 06:38 PM   #2
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,080
Rewards Points: 54
Default

Tinting old wood trim


Moved to painting forum.

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2012, 07:23 PM   #3
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,634
Rewards Points: 24
Default

Tinting old wood trim


If you are talking about 'Poly Shades'---That product has brought more adults to tears than the tax man--

Night mare in a can---every drip ,run or lap mark shows up as a dark mark---

Buy a can--try it on some scrap trim and see if you agree---

I am saying this as politely as I can---Mike---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2012, 09:20 PM   #4
Member
 
Gymschu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Eastern Ohio (heart of Appalachia)
Posts: 2,830
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Tinting old wood trim


Listen to Oh Mike. In the history of bad ideas, tinting poly ranks right up there. Just think of all the time you are going to spend mixing various colors/stains into the poly to get just the right look you want. Then you have to recreate that EXACT mix anytime you need more. It's a headache, believe me.
Gymschu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2012, 09:21 PM   #5
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Tinting old wood trim


I do it quite often.. Not with polyshades though.
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 06:19 AM   #6
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,634
Rewards Points: 24
Default

Tinting old wood trim


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
I do it quite often.. Not with polyshades though.
Teach us--There are times I could use that technique--

I have had plenty of practice with finishes over the years---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 06:30 AM   #7
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Tinting old wood trim


Seems like I just did this, but don't feel like looking for it..

I use it mainly to blend in a new piece of trim to old.
I will start by staining it just under where I want to be ( if new) and put a quick dry finish on it. ( often Universal shellac, but I also use waterborne Zar ultra max these days) This kind of brings us to where this project is.

Then I will test ( if I have any similar scraps) a small mix using either a quick dry oil poly ( like Zar oil poly) , shellac ( which is much harder to handle) or the WB Zar tinting with universal tints usually.
IF I like the mix I duplicate to the quantity needed.

I dont put so much color in it that the mix shows brushstrokes, and I plan on doing a number of coats to ease up to where I want to be .
I might adjust the color as I go along.

It is kind of arty, and you have to brush always with the grain, but I have darkened some things quite a bit using this technique.

I do not think this is a DIY project- I have been mixing paint and stain for 30+ years..
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 06:38 AM   #8
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,634
Rewards Points: 24
Default

Tinting old wood trim


I understand---I try not to tell folks how I achieve the finishes I do---so much is instinct and years of playing with different products---

What works for me seldom works for a novice---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 07:59 AM   #9
Member
 
Gymschu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Eastern Ohio (heart of Appalachia)
Posts: 2,830
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Tinting old wood trim


Brushjockey you do it all the time because you are a PROFESSIONAL. Imagine a DIYer mixing and stirring, mixing and stirring, color not quite right, more mixing, etc.
Gymschu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 08:50 AM   #10
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Tinting old wood trim


..Didn't I say that?
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
Gymschu (07-21-2012)
Old 07-21-2012, 11:30 AM   #11
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Tinting old wood trim


You know OP... It sounds like you have some really nice woodwork and while the task of stripping it sounds daunting? It really is the way to approach this. You might see what a paint stripping company charges in your area.

Before I stopped working one of the last and best tools I ever owned was an infrared stripper. It loosened layer upon layer of paint without chemicals, was safe to use and amazingly fast. Since you just have varnish over stain you could go room by room and be done in no time and you will have done the refinishing right.



They are expensive but you can rent them (although I am told their can be long waiting lists). Fact of the matter is if you can spare the cashflow you can buy one, use it as much as you need to, and turn around and sell it ending up paying much less than it what it would have cost you to rent one. And buying it you will not be under pressure to get it returned.

Note that the hands free rail system is a must if you ever plan to use it on siding.

Last edited by user1007; 07-21-2012 at 11:37 AM. Reason: Added Photos
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 06:53 PM   #12
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,634
Rewards Points: 24
Default

Tinting old wood trim


sure would like to see one of those in action--I saw the rail system in one of your earlier posts---

sure beats chemicals!
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2012, 07:08 PM   #13
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Tinting old wood trim


That is nice- fortunately I don't have to strip very often...

Well, except for the ..nevermind...

__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Exterior wood trim replacement???? rac58 Building & Construction 2 05-11-2012 10:31 AM
Re-painting interior wood trim jennifer.hilo Painting 7 01-24-2012 07:22 AM
Help selecting wood to trim out interior windows and doorways RobertN Carpentry 11 01-07-2011 04:38 PM
Tile with a wood trim? trick29392 Flooring 3 06-26-2008 07:19 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.