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wengang1 12-01-2013 09:32 PM

Three questions about paint job in progress
 
2 Attachment(s)
Photos attached.
I've primed and finished my first coat of paint (Sherwin Williams both).

First question, I cut in all the edges with a nylon 4" paintbrush, but every edge has large spots where the paint didn't take very well. The field of the walls all have pretty universal coverage (where the roller applied the paint). I'm wondering if the second coat will take care of this, or if I'm not using the paintbrush correctly. It looked covered when I finished cutting in, but again, lots of spots where the primer/mud shows through.

Second question (see photo) I do have a few ridge marks here and there, caused by the edge of the roller. In most cases, I was able to chase those lines and eliminate them, but in a few cases, I didn't see them before they hardened. How do I take care of those?

Third question (see photo). During preparation, I had a 3-foot section of wall where the tapered joint was giving me trouble and not coming out well, so I sanded back down to the paper and started over on it. I'm not sure at what point I missed it, but somehow I managed to prime and paint over that without first getting it smoothed. What can I do to get that right? I assume I have to sand through the paint and primer and get down to the mud again. If so, how can I build this back up to smoothly blend with the first coat of paint on the rest of the wall? It's a pretty large area, and I'm thinking the new paint on the damaged area will have marks around the perimeter where it meets the paint from the rest of the wall.

oh'mike 12-02-2013 05:57 AM

Cutting in---some paints don't cover well---so a second coat is needed on the cuts---

Roller lap marks---often caused by a poor quality roller cover---other times--technique---some times a thick sticky paint--Behr has been one that does that--

As to the missed sanding of the drywall repair---you will have a hard time sanding a painted patch--usually it is better to add more mud and feather out the patch further---

Be sure you prime the repair before painting or the finish paint will have a different sheen than the rest of the wall.

A bright light helps prevent a lot of the issues you are having---a halogen spot light would have shadowed the patch and the lap marks before they became a problem.

ToolSeeker 12-02-2013 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wengang1 (Post 1273598)
Photos attached.
I've primed and finished my first coat of paint (Sherwin Williams both).

First question, I cut in all the edges with a nylon 4" paintbrush, but every edge has large spots where the paint didn't take very well. The field of the walls all have pretty universal coverage (where the roller applied the paint). I'm wondering if the second coat will take care of this, or if I'm not using the paintbrush correctly. It looked covered when I finished cutting in, but again, lots of spots where the primer/mud shows through.

Second question (see photo) I do have a few ridge marks here and there, caused by the edge of the roller. In most cases, I was able to chase those lines and eliminate them, but in a few cases, I didn't see them before they hardened. How do I take care of those?

Third question (see photo). During preparation, I had a 3-foot section of wall where the tapered joint was giving me trouble and not coming out well, so I sanded back down to the paper and started over on it. I'm not sure at what point I missed it, but somehow I managed to prime and paint over that without first getting it smoothed. What can I do to get that right? I assume I have to sand through the paint and primer and get down to the mud again. If so, how can I build this back up to smoothly blend with the first coat of paint on the rest of the wall? It's a pretty large area, and I'm thinking the new paint on the damaged area will have marks around the perimeter where it meets the paint from the rest of the wall.

Probably not the brush's fault it really hard to get a brush and roller to look the same. On your walls where they meet get a 4'' roller the same size nap as your big roller, get the one that has nap on the end. Then just roll the corner will do both sides. Paint will be the same texture and thickness as the rest of the walls. This can also be used where the wall meets the ceiling but a little different. Cut in with your brush as evenly as you can then roll as close to the ceiling as you can being careful not to bump the ceiling with your roller. This will leave a very thin line that won't be rolled but won't be noticeable.
On the roller lines if they are only visible they will cover with the next coat. If you can feel them they need to be sanded. There are several things that cause roller marks. A couple of the most common I think are, putting too much pressure on the roller, and putting the paint on too thin. Also always point your roller the same way, this means keep the end of the roller where the handle goes in always pointed the same way. Just from the way they are made it is very easy to put more pressure on the end where the handle goes in so to paint if you are going from left to right keep that end pointed to the right then if that end leaves a mark the other end will smooth it out.
Yes you need to sand that area do your repairs, then prime and repaint. For a repair that large I would repaint the entire wall too be sure of the match.
Hope this helps.

ToolSeeker 12-02-2013 06:25 AM

Mike types faster than I do.LOL:laughing::yes:

oh'mike 12-02-2013 06:34 AM

I like the little 'hot dog' rollers with the plastic button on the end---If you keep that button clean, you can bump the ceiling without leaving paint---The wide swath that the little roller leaves makes rolling the walls safer---less likelyhood of bumping the ceiling when rolling the walls---

ToolSeeker 12-02-2013 06:43 AM

Absolutely agree I should have said for the ceiling use the one with the button. It's kind of amazing what those little rollers will do, and they are so cheap I usually don't even wash them out. If I do something small I will wash it out then use it for primer next time.

chrisn 12-02-2013 05:13 PM

Also, pitch out the cheap nylon 4 in brush and get a good quality 2 1/2 in or 3, a 4 incher is for exterior( as far as I am concerned)

wengang1 12-03-2013 03:41 PM

For sanding those ridges after the first coat, what grit should it be?

On the small roller, I have one and I tried it along the top of the wall, but with the roller sideways, the paint starts running down the roller and dripping. I found it too hard to use.

As for technique, I've seen several sources that say to paint on a W and then paint it out into a square. I guess the method that always points the same way is going in a series straight lines?

On the drywall repair, I'm seeing sand and don't sand. This was only the first coat, so the whole wall is definitely getting another coat after this spot is repaired, primed, and painted to match the rest of the wall. Does that make a difference? My inclination is to sand it down and start over.

On lighting, I'm using a 300W light that usually sits on the floor. What happened here was I had a few trouble spots prior to priming and I ended up re-mudding this 3-foot section. Then at some point I lost track and thought I'd already smoothed it so I didn't check it. I didn't put the light on it again until the first coat of paint was on.

Anyway, project is on hold for the moment. It rained here the other day and I found my first ever roof leak. It's always something!

wengang1 12-03-2013 03:44 PM

BTW, this was a tapered joint, not a butt joint. If I can solve it without sanding down, I'd like to. But how much feathering would it take? Maybe 10" knife either side of the tape?

ToolSeeker 12-03-2013 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wengang1 (Post 1274294)
For sanding those ridges after the first coat, what grit should it be?

On the small roller, I have one and I tried it along the top of the wall, but with the roller sideways, the paint starts running down the roller and dripping. I found it too hard to use.

As for technique, I've seen several sources that say to paint on a W and then paint it out into a square. I guess the method that always points the same way is going in a series straight lines?

On the drywall repair, I'm seeing sand and don't sand. This was only the first coat, so the whole wall is definitely getting another coat after this spot is repaired, primed, and painted to match the rest of the wall. Does that make a difference? My inclination is to sand it down and start over.

On lighting, I'm using a 300W light that usually sits on the floor. What happened here was I had a few trouble spots prior to priming and I ended up re-mudding this 3-foot section. Then at some point I lost track and thought I'd already smoothed it so I didn't check it. I didn't put the light on it again until the first coat of paint was on.

Anyway, project is on hold for the moment. It rained here the other day and I found my first ever roof leak. It's always something!

The roller should have been sideways and you had WAY too much paint on it.
The W or M used to be the approved method but not anymore. I would suggest You Tube Idaho painters/rolling a wall. Or BK Painting/painting a wall very good videos.
Personally I would sand down the rough the 10" knife with about 8" of mud on it it on both sides. Neither suggestion is wrong just different ways to do it.

wengang1 12-06-2013 03:13 PM

@Toolseeker Thanks. That repair turned out beautifully. The only thing I did wrong was, I didn't sand after I spot primed the area, so the stippling marks from the roller showed through the first finish coat. So I've sanded back down to the primer and smoothed, and tonight I'll paint again. Then another coat for the whole wall.

On the video, thanks for the tip. The Chinese say "Hearing it a hundred times is not as good as seeing it once." I do have a question though. The guy in the video cuts in by paintbrush followed by 4" roller. Then he seems to move on along. I've always heard not to cut in too far ahead to avoid the paint drying by the time it gets rolled. Does cutting in with a roller make that less of an issue? As a one-man crew, will I have time to cut in my whole ceiling (16x12) before I go back and roll it? I can see the cut in work taking an hour for me.

ToolSeeker 12-06-2013 03:23 PM

The old adage about keeping a wet edge is not as important as it used to be with the new paints. Take Aura for example it dries so fast it's almost impossible to keep a wet edge. The reason for cutting in with a brush along the ceiling line is you can get a much neater, straighter line. Then you use the roller to give you the same texture as the rest of the wall. And a roller and brush puts on different amounts of paint. going back over with the roller also evens this out.

Jmayspaint 12-06-2013 04:23 PM

Like tool said, With the newer fast drying paints rolling into a wet cut in is not as important. In fact it isn't recommended to even try anymore with Gennex paints like Aura. It's better to let the cut in dry to touch before rolling. Rolling into a cut line that has partially dried can cause the paint to 'curdle' (for lack of a better word) at the overlap.

Also the W rolling method is becoming a thing of the past as fast drying acrylics are easily 'overworked'.

I have used a variation of the W method in the past and liked it, but with faster drying paints it can do more harm than good.

jeffnc 12-06-2013 05:14 PM

I don't know any pro who ever paints with a W. It's faster and more consistent to go in vertical lines, overlapping each edge as you go. A fully loaded 3/8" roller does 8-9 feet nicely. Rolling W's is for DIY TV shows where they don't really know what they're doing.
Ridiculous:
http://www.moishes.com/blog/wp-conte...r-painting.jpg
http://blog.blinds.com/wp-content/up...1581001pYx.jpg
http://nhdh.org/wp-content/uploads/2...g-wall-red.jpg

Correct:
http://www.house-painting-info.com/i...-painting1.jpg

Ridiculous:
http://www.milanomia.com/via/gioia/e...mia.com002.jpg

Correct:
http://www.house-painting-info.com/i...-painting1.jpg

(Sorry, had to throw that in there. Ads where they show people using ladders or scaffolds to roll on paint are ridiculous. An extension pole should be used instead.)

Having almost always painted by myself, I learned early on how to edge without rolling into it while wet. That would be ridiculously tedious with 1 person. The trick is to get a thick enough coat on the cut in edge, while feathering it out at the bottom so there is no ridge. That way when you roll over it, it doesn't matter if it's wet or dry and there is no ridge.

wengang1 12-06-2013 07:20 PM

Which part of NC? I'm from there myself.

As to the ceiling (16x12) I'm wondering, since a single loaded cover does about an 8 foot strip, should I try to stretch it and go in 12 foot runs, or should I stop at 8 foot, reload, do 4 and 4, reload, then 8 again, or maybe cut the ceiling in half and do 8 foot runs to the middle of the room each way? I guess my concern is that if I stop in the field and then come back and put the roller back down, there will be contact marks at the meeting places.

Also, I've been having a real problem, especially with the 4" roller, the outside edge (not connected to the handle) gets covered in paint while dipping, and it throws big drops of paint when I roll it down the wall. I've actually had to wipe it with a wet cloth after each time loading it.


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