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-   -   Thin paint or buy another quart? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/thin-paint-buy-another-quart-186651/)

kimberland30 09-07-2013 05:21 PM

Thin paint or buy another quart?
 
I caulked our crown molding and since we have textured walls, there is no way to get around having to touch up the wall paint around the trim (white trim, white caulk, tan walls).

I have about 1/4" left at the bottom of the gallon of paint I used to paint the walls. I have two walls and a hallway to touch up - and in a week I'll have the same two walls and hallway to do when we install new baseboards.

Is there a way I can thin the remaining paint to cover these areas, or should I just buy a quart? My concern is that I won't have enough paint even if I thin in...and if I buy a quart the color might not match. I'm really trying NOT to repaint the walls unless I absolutely have to.

Thanks!!

Jmayspaint 09-07-2013 05:49 PM

Thinning it a little wont hurt. It's not likely a new quart will match good enough for perfect touch ups. The color is almost always thrown off a little In the translation from quart to gallon.

I did a job with SW Emerald interior a while back, and the specs actually said to thin it a little for touch up. I don't remember how much it said to thin, 10-15% maybe.?.

My touch up paint ends up being thin a lot of times because its the last bit that I cleaned out of the sprayer. .

kimberland30 09-07-2013 06:16 PM

Next question, what do I thin it with? Water? Paint thinner? It's Valspar Signature in Satin. I have an empty plastic 2.5 quart container that I can use to measure out what I have and thin it out appropriately.

Jmayspaint 09-07-2013 06:22 PM

Just water. 10-15% is probably a good place to start.

kimberland30 09-07-2013 06:25 PM

Thank you so much! I'll start off with 10% and see how much it gets me..if I need more I will add a bit more water.

BTW, every time I see your user name I think of James May from Top Gear. :)

kwikfishron 09-07-2013 06:34 PM

The BM I was using this week said 8oz to a gallon max (6.25%).

ToolSeeker 09-07-2013 08:46 PM

If thinning doesn't give you enough plan so what you have will end in an inconspicuous (thank you spell check) place. Then if the new qt. is off just a little it won't show.

kimberland30 09-10-2013 03:04 PM

I was about to thin it out enough to cover the areas I was working on, plus save some for the baseboards. I shouldn't need as much for those because of all the doors so I should be good to go.

Thanks!

jeffnc 09-10-2013 07:57 PM

Thinning 10% is very unlikely to help you at the end of the day. If 4 ounces isn't enough paint, will 4.4 ounces really be? You aren't going to find inconspicuous places up near your crown molding.

What I would do it is buy a new quart and paint what you need to paint. Then go over the transition between the old and new paint with the old paint thinned. I'd thin it not to get more mileage out of it, but to reduce the texture of it. Then put it on very thinly. You're basically doing a "whitewash" to disguise any slight color difference between the old and new paint. A thicker coat of paint hides your caulk (bigger color difference) and a thinner coat of paint blends in the tiny color difference in paints.

It might work.

chrisn 09-11-2013 03:46 AM

I would just get more paint( qt, gal, whatever) that matches. How hard can that be?

kimberland30 09-11-2013 09:10 AM

Whoops, I mistyped above. It should have read that "I was ABLE to thin it out"...I've already done it and will have enough left for the baseboards.

Jeffnc: Thinning it just a little bit enabled me to touch up around the crown and leave enough left over to touch up around the baseboards after they are installed. I didn't need much but didn't think I had enough left in the can to cover it. I get what you are saying about transitioning from new to old paint using a different can but luckily I didn't have to do it. :)

Chrisn: Buying paint wouldn't have been a big deal - but paint rarely matches 100% when going from a gallon to quart, or vice versa. I was only trying to do touch ups without having to repaint an entire wall (or blending it in like Jeffnc mentioned).

chrisn 09-11-2013 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kimberland30 (Post 1240618)
Whoops, I mistyped above. It should have read that "I was ABLE to thin it out"...I've already done it and will have enough left for the baseboards.

Jeffnc: Thinning it just a little bit enabled me to touch up around the crown and leave enough left over to touch up around the baseboards after they are installed. I didn't need much but didn't think I had enough left in the can to cover it. I get what you are saying about transitioning from new to old paint using a different can but luckily I didn't have to do it. :)

Chrisn: Buying paint wouldn't have been a big deal - but paint rarely matches 100% when going from a gallon to quart, or vice versa. I was only trying to do touch ups without having to repaint an entire wall (or blending it in like Jeffnc mentioned).

It really should or would not be a problem if it was from a real paint store, say, Ben Moore, but being Valspar, then yes, I see your point.

jeffnc 09-11-2013 06:04 PM

That's silly. For many years, Home Depot matched paint far better than Sherwin Williams possibly could. At some point SW upped their game, and now they're probably using the same computer, although things like that change all the time. It's not the paint brand that determines matching, it's the computer, the operator, the calibration of the tint machine, etc.

(See post #5 http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/white-...packle-186837/)

Regardless, there are still many variables, and it's true - paint almost never matches so well that you can patch it on a wall and no one can tell any difference looking discriminatingly. Paint can age on the wall, so that the corners might be darker than the center, so where you take your paint sample makes a difference. Or many other reasons.

chrisn 09-12-2013 02:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffnc (Post 1240780)
That's silly. For many years, Home Depot matched paint far better than Sherwin Williams possibly could. At some point SW upped their game, and now they're probably using the same computer, although things like that change all the time. It's not the paint brand that determines matching, it's the computer, the operator, the calibration of the tint machine, etc.

(See post #5 http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/white-...packle-186837/)

Regardless, there are still many variables, and it's true - paint almost never matches so well that you can patch it on a wall and no one can tell any difference looking discriminatingly. Paint can age on the wall, so that the corners might be darker than the center, so where you take your paint sample makes a difference. Or many other reasons.


In your mind, not most others:thumbsup:

Where is Valspar sold?

jeffnc 09-12-2013 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 1240924)
In your mind, not most others:thumbsup:

Haven't heard a single other opinion that says BM or any other "real paint store" will make paint matches so perfect that they can patch a wall without noticing any difference except in some lucky cases - but not as a general rule. I'd call Sherwin Williams a real paint store, and I just matched paint from them a couple weeks ago that couldn't perfectly match. And that's with their improved paint matching over several years ago.

So yeah, I'd say in my mind and all others except yours, until we hear otherwise.


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