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-   -   Textured walls (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/textured-walls-18007/)

Dafeesh 03-04-2008 12:24 PM

Textured walls
 
I have a fairly new home in central Florida and all of the walls are super textured, I assume because it hides all of the builders' crappy drywall jobs. Anyway, I would like a bit "classier" finish in the dining room. I want to do a chair rail with a solid color above it, and vertical stripes below. So I would like the flatter, plastered look that you used to get in houses when builders cared a bit more about craftsmanship. When prepping the wall I would assume that I would have to skimcoat. Is there any prep before that, maybe using some 80-grit to knock off the high points of the texture. Any advice will be helpful, thanks to all who take their time to read this.

End Grain 03-04-2008 01:00 PM

Dafeesh, I'd like to answer your question by deliberately not answering it and so I'll apologize for doing so upfront.

In some areas of the Country, texturing is done as part of the homes' aesthetics as out here in Arizona for example. While some imperfections are no doubt more easily concealed with texture, it is primarily used as a way to create an effect, simulate another material's surface, break up the light within a room and/or simply create a visual relief for the eye. Flat smooth walls can become patently boring over time and over-textured walls can make a room look completely pebblegrained, sort of like the surface of a giant football. Somewhere in between the two is usually pleasing.

My suggestion is - assuming you do want to proceed - to pick the absolute smallest single wall for a test and a way to practice various methods or techniques. If you're going to experiment and learn and possibly ruin something in the process, why not make something small enough that you can more easily and less expensively recover from?

As for the actual materials to buy and use, you may want to stop by your local bonafide paint store - not a big box retailer or home center - first and find out from them what is commonly used. I suggest this only because you live in Florida which is very humid and very hot at times and each locale develops a roster of the more successful products and compounds. They also probably know what materials were commonly used in the texturing of the walls in your area. They can also recommend which of their products will probably work best. Once you have that info, you can develop a project materials worksheet and assess what the cost would be.

The easiest thing for one to do is to run out, buy a can of primer et al, prime the walls and start slathering a compound on them to first level out the texture. Then, after it's dried and officially an integral part of your walls, the burden is solely upon you to sand the walls nice and smooth and reasonably flat. Sounds much easier than it is, especially on the scale of entire walls in a room.

I know how I would proceed if I were given the task but you may be getting in a bit over your head without first knowing all of the steps required, the cost of the materials, various techniques and methods, etc.

Good luck!

AtlanticWBConst. 03-04-2008 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dafeesh (Post 104224)
I have a fairly new home in central Florida and all of the walls are super textured, I assume because it hides all of the builders' crappy drywall jobs. Anyway, I would like a bit "classier" finish in the dining room. I want to do a chair rail with a solid color above it, and vertical stripes below. So I would like the flatter, plastered look that you used to get in houses when builders cared a bit more about craftsmanship. When prepping the wall I would assume that I would have to skimcoat. Is there any prep before that, maybe using some 80-grit to knock off the high points of the texture. Any advice will be helpful, thanks to all who take their time to read this.

Sanding and skim coating. You've got it.

Caution: I suggest that you try your skills in these area first in an obsure location, like a closet. See how you do.

If it turns out right, go to town elsewhere...

Dafeesh 03-04-2008 01:13 PM

Thanks for the reply. I have not gone to our local Sherwin Williams yet. That was definitely going to be my first stop before painting anything else in my house after using Behr paint. That stuff was rubbish. When I do go to the SW I will have to ask what they recommend because Pretty much all of the houses in the area are made by the same builders with the same texture on the walls. I can't be the only person here in my area who wants some smooth walls, so maybe someone else has asked them. I guess I am a bit used to Yankee houses, being a Massachusetts born person, not a whole lot of texture from what I recall from my parents houses.
I agree I need to get a handle on the required steps before proceeding, but that is why I ask for suggestions on techniques and material. Thanks again!!

slickshift 03-04-2008 05:22 PM

Scrape and sand any and everything you can
Big scrapers, power sanders...whatever it takes
Might go easy, might be tough
Get as much off as possible
Then skim coat

Dafeesh 03-04-2008 09:58 PM

So what I am getting is pretty much what I thought. Level the texture and skim. I can handle that I think. I have a belt sander and a couple of orbitals, I can even get the wife helping me. Now I need to plan a way to frame the entrance of the room. The door way has an arch that has no molding, so I will have to get crafty with the band saw and router table to see what I can come up with. Thanks for all of the help people. This was my first day in the forum and it's nice to see that this place will be kind and helpful:)


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