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Old 08-12-2013, 06:56 PM   #1
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


After reading up as much as I could (including on this site's sister site, PaintTalk), it looks like priming T1-11 siding is the way to go before painting it, especially in places where the weather cycles hard (and I live in Quebec).

The contractor that came out to the house tonight, though, said he wouldn't prime -- just put on two coats of high-quality paint.

Obviously I'd be saving money on not priming, but T1-11 is pretty rare around here, and there's a greater-than-zero chance he's never really dealt with it before. I'm just looking for a broader range of opinions, AND a recommendation for primer. XIM Bonder seems to be highly regarded, but it's not available in Canada.

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Old 08-12-2013, 07:27 PM   #2
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


As a painter for over 30 years, I will tell you what you probably DON'T want to hear. PRIME IT! Personally, for T-111, I like a slow-drying oil primer that soaks into the wood. It just gives an incredible surface to which the topcoats will adhere. I've done it this way for many years and nearly every T-111 job I have ever done lasts 8-10 years before a recoat. Now, you do have another option........you can STAIN T-111 with a product such as SW's Woodscapes........it does not require a primer and you get the same longevity with it as you do with paint. Just my two cents'.

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Old 08-12-2013, 07:46 PM   #3
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


Thanks for the input -- staining was the original approach, but it was a very dark blue that even after a power wash still has deep blue patches. I want to go light, hence the desire to prime and paint.

If I decide to paint this bad boy solo, what kind of tools are best?
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Old 08-12-2013, 07:55 PM   #4
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


I also vote for primer and oil is a better option. Let me add as long as you have the primer out anyway I would be sure to prime the front, back, and any cuts. And be sure to prime the bottom edge. T-111 has a tendency to wick water up from the bottom so the bottom edge is prone to rot. Without spraying I use a angle brush loaded with paint and run it in the groove, then use a 1/2" nap roller to paint the flat.
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Old 08-12-2013, 07:58 PM   #5
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


I have a rot problem along some walls -- I intend to trim the rot off, repair, and then paint.

I am, however, running out of time this year: I have a full-time job and also work Sundays, and am away for the last two weeks of September. It'll be too cold to paint in October, most likely. Would a primer-only coat survive the winter and be paintable in the spring, do you think?
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:07 PM   #6
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


Probably but if you could just get 1 coat of paint you would be a lot better. Even if your primer survived the winter I would advise you to reprime in the spring
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:02 PM   #7
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


You can put SW Woodscapes Acrylic Solid Stain over existing or new wood without a primer. It might take a couple coats if going much lighter. It is amazingly great stuff. You can get it mixed to any color, just like paint. A lot of antique home restorers where I was working switched to using it (or MAB equivalent which SW acquired) over primer and paint on 100 year old and replacement/patched cypress and cedar siding all the time.

It held up really well. Central Illinois does not get the snow you do but when wind blows off the prairie in January and February actual temps can be well below zero with wind chills -30 to -40 F. I used it on an elaborate lattice work, two color fence about eight years ago and with minor touch up in the spring it looks as good as when I first did it.

If you want to paint? I agree to seal and prime. I like Benjamin Moore's Fresh Start, solvent based alkyd primer for what you have in mind. You could even thin it just a bit to aid in absorption. You can tint it 40 percent or so of your paint color formula to help with coverage.

Leaving primer alone on the surface over the weekend makes me squirm a bit and I agree, you will want to prime again in the Spring if you take that approach. I guess it is better than no protection if that is all you can get to this season.

I guess in terms of waterbased primers, good old Zinsser 123 for interior and exterior would work. Fresh Start also comes in waterbased but I would go with the solvent based.

Not sure what brands are availed you up north? I should think Sherwin Williams and Ben Moore have stores?

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Old 08-12-2013, 10:10 PM   #8
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


Tool wise, I would use a nice fat 3/4" roller cover and chase your work with a brush. As suggested, make sure you get the undersides and in any seams.
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Old 08-13-2013, 07:43 AM   #9
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


"Not sure what brands are availed you up north? I should think Sherwin Williams and Ben Moore have stores?"



Nope. Neither.
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Old 08-13-2013, 05:52 PM   #10
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


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Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
"Not sure what brands are availed you up north? I should think Sherwin Williams and Ben Moore have stores?"



Nope. Neither.

I thought SW covered the world?
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:09 PM   #11
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


I have heard that Peel Bond is really great for T1-11. Goes on milky and thick, dries somewhat clear.
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Old 08-16-2013, 12:25 AM   #12
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


Did anyone mention water-proofing (at least the bottom areas) before? Tips: http://www.paintsource.net/pages/sol...d_surfaces.htm

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/keep-wo...ing-27167.html

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Old 08-16-2013, 12:50 AM   #13
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
I thought SW covered the world?
You crab eating painters that wear no pants.

Paint does not stick to that giant and growing oil slick nobody is being allowed to see in Canada because it has military, near eyes only, significance. Don't worry about it say some but even us mortals can see it growing rapidly with Google Earth and satellite recon we can order up.

SW logo will probably have to be modified soon. A tiny section of only a few million square hectres will have to be carved out of the logo with the disclaimer: "Most Sherwin Williams paints were designed to cover the Earth but we, as a company, admit, we cannot cover moving and oozing oil shale and especially as the spill in Canada increases to unimaginable proportions on a daily basis."

This uncontained situation in Canada may turn out to be one of the worst global environmental disasters if it cannot be contained soon.

Don't believe me. Zoom in. Google Earth it. It grows ever bigger every day. It has already dwarfed the damage the Valdez did to Alaska and the BP rig "incident" did to the Gulf of Mexico.
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Last edited by user1007; 08-16-2013 at 01:16 AM.
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Old 08-16-2013, 09:39 AM   #14
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T1-11 siding: priming in Quebec, Canada?


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Originally Posted by PantsMasterson View Post
Thanks for the input -- staining was the original approach, but it was a very dark blue that even after a power wash still has deep blue patches. I want to go light, hence the desire to prime and paint.

If I decide to paint this bad boy solo, what kind of tools are best?
If it is already painted then you don't need to prime.

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